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Discontinued

Arrow

Model # NP8667

Internet # 100119313

Store SKU # 817565

Newport 8 ft. x 6 ft. Steel Shed

This item has been discontinued.
The Home Depot no longer carries this specific product.

$218.00 /each
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PRODUCT OVERVIEW

Model # NP8667

Internet # 100119313

Store SKU # 817565

Traditional, gable-roof styling combines with Arrow design and engineering features to make the NP8667 tops in economical outdoor storage. The NP8667 makes it easy to store and organize anything, from lawn and garden equipment to sporting goods and outdoor gear.

  • Durable electro galvanized steel construction
  • 255 cu. ft. storage capacity provides space to stow your gardening tools and yard equipment when not in use
  • 8 ft. x 6 ft. size is compact enough to fit into most backyards
  • Some assembly required
  • Includes floor frame kit to support plywood (wood not included)
  • 43 sq. ft. available floor space
  • Pitched roof helps rain and melting snow cascade to the ground to help prevent standing water and leaks
  • Sliding doors pull apart for 43-1/2 in. entrance width to accommodate lawn mowers and wheelbarrows
  • Tall walk-in design offers over 6 ft. of headroom at the maximum interior height
  • Doors can be locked for added security

Info & Guides

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SPECIFICATIONS

Dimensions
Approximate Shed Depth (ft.) 
Approximate Shed Width (ft.) 
Assembled Depth (in.) 
71.25 in 
Assembled Height (in.) 
74.88 in 
Assembled Width (in.) 
99.75 in 
Door Opening Height (In.) 
65 
Door Opening Width (In.) 
43.5 
Door Opening Width (ft.) 
Product Depth (in.) 
71.25 
Product Height (ft.) 
6.2 
Product Height (in.) 
74.875 
Product Width (in.) 
99.75 in 
Sidewall Height (in.) 
67.00 
Details
Assembly Required 
Yes 
Floor Options 
No 
Floor Options 
Without Floor 
Foundation Included 
No 
Lockable Door/Gate Latch 
Yes 
Number of Doors 
Number of Windows 
Product Weight (lb.) 
156 lb 
Returnable 
90-Day 
Roof Color Family 
Brown/tan 
Roof Material 
Electrogalvanized Steel 
Roof Pitch 
1.5:12 
Roof Shape 
Peak 
Shed Door Type 
Sliding 
Shed Features 
Door Latch,Double Door,Lockable Door 
Shelving Included 
No 
Siding Color Family 
White 
Storage Capacity (cu. ft.) 
255 
Warranty / Certifications
Manufacturer Warranty 
12 year limited 

CUSTOMER REVIEWS

Rated 4.1 out of 5 by 191 reviewers.
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by For the price you can't beat this product I bought this shed and the lumber to build a platform on an uneven back yard. I personally found the instructions very easy to follow and was able to assemble by myself in just under 7 hours on a Saturday afternoon. I did read most of the reviews before purchasing and I did plan on using my whole weekend to complete the project and in a way I was bummed it took only a day as my wife put me to work cleaning on the other day ;). I did manage to almost cut a finger off but that was due to an unsteady ladder. It has rained a few times over the last week that it has been standing and no leaks. So to all the people that gave this a bad review you should have paid more attention to the instructions or not hire shady "contractors" to assemble it for you. :) May 30, 2012
Rated 3.0 out of 5.0 by buy lots of caulking Pros: inexpensive, attractive, interior 6ft high at the middle Cons: my roof leaks I assembled my shed using the supplied washers on all fasteners. The shed comes with weather stripping tape to seal the roof beam. I probably didn't seal the seam well enough as that part of the build comes towards the end of many long hours of work and I was tired and working stretched out on a ladder. I just sprayed my roof with a hose and the main seam leaks like crazy. I would strongly recommend using a good amount of caulking along the top of the roof seam instead of the tape. I found it difficult to reach far enough in to install and seal the last roof panel (and I'm 6' tall). I suggest using a 2x4 to temporarily brace under the beam to the ground if you need to lean out onto the roof. May 16, 2012
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Great Purchase I read all the reviews before deciding which shed to buy. This one had mostly good reviews and it was a very good price so I decided to go ahead with the purchase. Was it easy to assemble? Not really but I wasn't expecting it to be. It does take two people to work on it and MAKE SURE TO FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS. If you follow the instructions, it will come out right. The instructions have pictures that if you put your mind to it, they are understandable and help you with the assembly. My husband decided to do a few tweaks along the way. Further along the way, he found out the one tweak affects something else later on. So, DON'T DO TWEAKS. It has snowed AND rained ALOT in the past month and no leaks whatsoever in the shed and it has resisted pretty well. TIP: When you pick up the shed at the Home Depot store, drive around the parking lot and there is a shed just like it already built. Take pictures of the inside detail (where the corners meet, the way the door is set up, the ceiling, etc...) It will help you along the way when you are putting it together. Overall, I am pleased with the purchase. March 10, 2015
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Tips for building in tight quarters. I read every review on here before I purchased this shed looking for little hints to assembly this shed in tight confines. Only a couple reviews touched upon it, but since I needed the shed regardless, I bought it and set forth on my journey. The side of the house that I was building this was barely over 8 foot wide. I mean barely. (see photos) I built the frame from 2x4s and to make it easier on me I had Home Depot cut my lengths to the exact specs I needed. I used 5/8" plywood for the floor. Again, I had HD cut these. (its just so much easier and more precise) If I were to do it over, I would probably have used 3/4" but thats just because I tend to over build for longevity . The 5/8" is fine though, as long as you use braces. If not it will weaken over time. The trick to get a nice solid floor is to use braces in between the 2x4 lengths. I spaced these about 24" apart and staggered them for more strength. I cut these to size myself. I also used some outdoor house paint I had laying around in the garage and painted the entire frame BEFORE assembly of frame. (including the plywood flooring on both sides) I paint before assembly to make sure the paint covers the ends of all the wood, as moisture will get in there more easily. I am in AZ so we dont get much rain, but again, I wanted a solid base. Once this is built, it will be impossible to disassemble to make any corrections. (hence the desire for 3/4" floor) I dropped this frame where I wanted it, and used some brick pavers to level the foundation to the slight sloping grade of the ground, back filling with dirt for extra security. I then screwed down the plywood floor. Do NOT use nails on the plywood. Drywall screws work fine. Dont skimp on screws as the weather makes things expand and contract and things will stay in place better Another tip... pay attention to where the studs are BEFORE you drop down the plywood. That way if you have a loose board later down the road, you will know where the floor bracing and studs are to stick in a couple screws. Mark the plywood with a small line with a Sharpie for future reference. (these are all little tips and not a deal breaker if you dont do some of these things) Now the fun part. There was NO WAY I was going to be able to get to the screws on the side panels with a drill or a screwdriver. So after studying the display shed at Home Depot for 20 minutes and taking measurements, and reading the assembly instructions thoroughly, I came up with a solution. This next part DEFINITELY requires TWO people. To solve my clearance problem, I built each wall as a separate entity. In other words, I built the wall independently of the structure. (hence two people) I assembled each wall from the front corner piece to the rear corner piece. One person held the pieces upright while the other person screwed it together. Then we set each wall in place on top of the frame WITHOUT screwing it down to the floor. We then proceeded to assemble the front and rear facing walls and braces to the two side walls that we built. If its windy, forget it! We basically assembled the whole shed (walls, but not doors) on top of the frame, again without screwing it down to the frame. After everything was screwed together (minus door) we then squared up our structure to the frame and screwed the shed to the 2x4 frame. A word on squaring the shed. It is crucial you get it squared up. That being said, the shed is manufactured in such a way that as long as you keep that in mind as you build it, double checking the alignment, when you're done the shed will be nearly square. Anyone stating in these reviews that the shed was crooked didnt spend enough time when assembling. Do not freak out. about getting it square. Just use common sense when assembling and it will be fine. A square structure all the way along w3ill ensure that the doors close, roof panels line up etc Also, MAKE SURE you check and double check EACH panel and its number. I assembled one of the wall panels upside down and had to disassemble and start over. There is a reason for each and every hole that is pre-drilled on these pieces. And you will find out when its too late as you get further along attaching other panels. Assemble each piece and make sure you read ahead to whatever is attaching to it so that you can prevent any issues before assemble. READ AND PAY ATTENTION TO THE INSTRUCTIONS! I cannot stress this enough. On to the roof panels. I used a very sharp tin snips and trimmed each roof piece to fit the very close confines. This portion took almost as long as the walls because I wanted it precise. I took a little off at a time and custom trimmed the roof panel over hangs to match the wall of the house. (see photos) There was a slight taper to each panel as the brick fence on the other side was off by a few degrees, which made the shed roof panels fit a degree or 2 off of square to the wall. (the shed was square) Take your time and triple and quadruple check the fit of each panel to the wall. I wanted it barely touching the house to give me as much over hang for rain water run off as possible. I did the same on the fence side roof panels. The brick wall wasnt exactly flat, horizontally, so the front roof panels were not trimmed and gave me a nice over hang to drain water over the fence.. (see left side roof panel photos) I literately have like an inch between the house wall and shed wall, and maybe 2 inches between the fence and shed wall. FYI on roof panels. This is a 2 man job to secure the screws as someone has to be inside shed while someone is in the backyard (rear shed wall) on a ladder to be able to tighten the screws. (I used some bricks sitting on top of the screw heads to hold it down while I put on the nuts from inside. It worked, but much easier with 2 people) After the roof panels were on, I took some expanding insulation foam in a can, and squirted anywhere I saw daylight around the roof to wall mating points. This will insure that no rain seeps in on my trimmed roof panels. I had about a 1/2" to 1" of overhang., Plenty for AZ, and plenty to ensure no water leaks. If you live in wet weather, or snow areas, it wouldn't hurt to also do this on the metal frame to floor gaps from the inside, as well. I assembled the doors and when the shed was complete, I took some chalking and sealed the front door frame. This will insure no water seeps under the frame. I did this because I screwed the shed down flush to the back portion of the frame, and the front of the floor frame extended an inch or two in front of the door frame. This was done on purpose when I built it to eliminate any leaks on the back portion that wont get much attention once built as its on the back side of the house where the pool pump is etc. (essentially dead space) All in all it was a great accomplishment because I was told I'd never be able to get it to fit on the side of the house. HA! Motivation to prove them wrong ....and a little ingenuity helped Yes, it probably took me twice as long as most assembles, but when its custom, thats what happens. By the way, once your walls are built and the back wall is attached, your helper can leave. You can trim the roof panels and fit them solo, but later you will need an extra hand for 15 minutes to screw in the top roof screws. It requires plenty of patience to build it this way. Basically this is an adult erector set. Take your time... measure measure measure when you do the roof panels. Dont overtighten the screws as the plastic washers will squeeze out. There is plenty of hardware and screws for the job, even after dropping dozens of them. I have many many extra screws to add to my collection. The bricks pavers along the wall will eventually be installed in front of the shed as a parking pad. This is wear I park my motorcycle and the shed was built for a little 'shop' to customize my bike and for miscellaneous stuff that wont fit in the garage with the rest of my vehicles. I ran electrical to it and hung some florescent lights in it. Eventually it will have a canopy to shade me from the AZ sun. I hope this review helps. I kind of jumped in with both feet and took what came with it. =) All in all, I am extremely happy and satisfied with this shed. You cant go wrong for $218. Keep in mind, the cost of the wood for the frame etc. I think I had almost $100 in it after purchase. January 22, 2015
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by First impressions. First off, I am not a professional. I am merely an avid do it yourself type, with some tools. The instructions do say it takes 2 people 8 hours to complete, and to NOT do so on a windy day. They are not joking about this, not even a little. I built is by myself (aside from the doors) in 8 hours, and it was a mildly windy day. April + Houston, Tx. = windy, always. I do recommend sorting all the nuts, bolts, screws, and washers into individual containers before beginning. I used clear tupper-ware containers to make it easier to identify, even from beneath. I built the foundation, from pressure treated 2X4's, outdoor rated plywood, and 3" deck screws. Assuring the foundation is flat is very important. Something that will save lots and lots of time is having a power screw driver, or impact driver. I used both, but primarily an impact driver for most of the screws and bolts as it is faster. If you follow the instructions to the letter, you should have no problem putting this together in 8 hours time. Also, beware of sharp edges. April 9, 2015
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by The Shed in red For the price you're not going to find anything close to the value. I feel you need to modify a few things when they don't come together as well as it should. This is a project. If you have built a ikea dresser you will be able to figure this out. I added clear coat of paint to help with rust in the future and added. I just hate that brown color so quick paint job make a big difference. I would probably buy another if I need one in the future. I used the base to sturdy up the walls as seen in the pic. It really helped make the walls really sturdy. August 4, 2014
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Very cheap material, but for the price it makes sense. It was really hard to assemble it. You have to do this with help of another person. Takes 5-7 hours so be ready, i did my best to hurry and still took for ever. Actually divided my time into two days. All the parts are so easy to bend so you have to always be careful. Almost none of the holes aligned right and had to use force, you can tell these parts are machine made by bulk, which is why they are not all straight. But in the end it came out great and instead of anchoring it down to the concrete I placed 3/4" plywood as the floor and believe me that shed is not going anywhere lol.i used power drills and pliers to do this job. October 7, 2013
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Great for the money Before I bought this shed i read a lot of reviews. Most of the complaints were: "hard to put together / install" , "can't reach roof line to seal it", or "leaks" . These reviews included one that was siting 3 days to put it together with a contractors help. I was concerned but i bought it anyway. It took me 7 hours total from box open to finished assembly. The only thing you will need is a 2nd pair of hands to hold parts while you erect the corners and stabilize them with more structure. The day i put mine together it was a bit windy so at one point i had 5 people holding the corner pieces so that the wind would not damage the sheet metal. The 2nd pair of hands is almost needed constantly to hold pieces while other drills / bolts. Simply put you can't be on both sides of the wall. The kit comes with PLENTY of extra screws / nuts / bolts/ grommets. My only delay was that i assembled the shed before i made the foundation. you can just put the shed on the ground since it includes a floor kit. BUT putting any metal in dirt is a recipe for rust. I made mine out of pressure treated 4x4 that i laid out around the edges. i used 1 foot long rebar that i predrilled and pounded thru the 4x4s into the ground. then i laid 5/8 plywood and nailed that to the 4x4. There is a strap kit that you use augers to secure to the ground but where i live there is a lot of cliche. As far as the leaky issues that were cited in other reviews. i have had it rain a couple times with NO LEAKS. if you place it directly on the ground i can see where you might have issues. But mine is elevated by the 4x4s i installed. I also held a hose on it going all over the roof / roof line and have found no leaks. Not sure why mine is good and theirs (other reviewers) leaked. I'm guessing if it takes you 3 days to put this shed together your doing something wrong. There were a couple mistakes i made during assembly but i just took apart the mistakes and reassembled correctly. The only one that is worth mention is the ceiling structure where it instructs you to put together the ceiling beams and a L brace. It only requires you to put together 1 and leave the other 2 braces without the L braces. The instructions tell you to put that together in like step 3. I didnt realize that until step 23 (6 hours later) that i only needed 1 of those not 3. Necessities: cordless drill / driver 2nd person to help Patince May 15, 2015
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