0000988010602

Bruce

Model C134

Internet #100579287

Store SKU #296601

Store SO SKU #610659

Plano Marsh Oak 3/4 in. Thick x 2-1/4 in. Wide x Random Length Solid Hardwood Flooring (20 sq. ft. / case)

$3.29 /sq. ft.
Covers 20.00 sq. ft.
$65.80 /case
  • Random length planks create a unique look
  • Nail down installation
  • Janka hardness rating of 1290

Frequently Bought Together

Product Overview

Get the versatile look of oak flooring with the Bruce Plano Strip Marsh Oak 3/4 in. Thick x 2-1/4 in. Wide x Random Length Solid Hardwood Flooring. The random length of the planks adds dimension to your room. The marsh oak finish will match many home interiors. The planks have an eased edge and a Janka wood hardness rating of 1290 to suit your needs. This flooring is designed for residential use and requires nail-down installation.

California residents: see   Proposition 65 information

  • Wood species: Real oak hardwood
  • 3/4 in. Thickness x 2-1/4 in. Width x Random Length Planks (up to 84 in.)
  • Coordinate with molding made for 3/4 in. solid wood flooring
  • 20 sq. ft. per case and case weight: 60 lbs.
  • Construction: Solid oak hardwood flooring
  • Prefinished Dura-Luster Plus medium marsh finish
  • Janka wood hardness rating/resistance to denting: 1290
  • Appropriate Grade for Installation: Above Grade or On Grade
  • Installation: Nail down
  • Residential use
  • 15-year residential warranty
  • Don't forget your coordinating trim and moldings
  • All online orders for this item ship via parcel ground and may arrive in multiple boxes
  • It is recommended you purchase a minimum of 10% overage to account for cuts
  • Planks have an eased edge

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Customer Questions & Answers

25 Questions80 Answers

Customer Questions & Answers

Plano Marsh Oak 3/4 in. Thick x 2-1/4 in. Wide x Random Length Solid Hardwood Flooring (20 sq. ft. / case)
Plano Marsh Oak 3/4 in. Thick x 2-1/4 in. Wide x Random Length Solid Hardwood Flooring (20 sq. ft. / case)

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9 answers

Is this prefinished with a micro groove

This question is from Plano Marsh Oak 3/4 in. Thick x 2-1/4 in. Wide x Random Length Solid Hardwood Flooring (20 sq. ft. / case)
Asked by
Cd
March 28, 2013
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Answers (9)

Asked by
Illinois
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June 4, 2015
Answer: 
Yes, this is prefinished with a micro groove.
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Asked by
NE Maryland, USA
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March 4, 2014
Answer: 
Yes.
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Asked by
Branchland, West Virginia 25506
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September 24, 2013
Answer: 
I think it has a beautiful shiny finish and it is tongue and groove.
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Asked by
Allen
Central Wisconsin
July 24, 2013
Answer: 
This product has a micro groove. When put together, there is a small groove between each piece. Looks great. It's exactly what I wanted.
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Asked by
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April 9, 2013
Answer: 
yes it does have a micro bevel on it
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Asked by
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April 8, 2013
Answer: 
Yes it is prefinished, and the edges are micro beveled.
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Asked by
Lancaster, PA
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April 3, 2013
Answer: 
The edge and end treatments on the boards are eased, which is more pronounced "v" than micro.
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Asked by
Delaware, USA
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March 28, 2013
Answer: 
Yes, prefinished and micro-groove. The finish is quite durable. The micro- groove makes installation look more professional as subfloor irregularities do not show as they would without.
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Asked by
NC
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March 28, 2013
Answer: 
If you mean does it have a groove between each plank after installation, yes, a slight groove due to the prefinished smoothed edges.
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9 answers

how long should the flooring acclimate to the environment before installation?

This question is from Plano Marsh Oak 3/4 in. Thick x 2-1/4 in. Wide x Random Length Solid Hardwood Flooring (20 sq. ft. / case)
Asked by
Steve
CT
June 18, 2012
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Answers (9)

Asked by
MD
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February 23, 2015
Answer: 
The longer the better. If you have a good moisture meter, that can point you in the right direction for a proper timeframe to acclimate the flooring. If the humidity fluctuates quite a bit in your home, the timeframe is very complicated because the wood will shrink and swell with the humidity levels. In my experience with this product, a good amount of the product after 34 days of acclimation in a dry Read More
The longer the better. If you have a good moisture meter, that can point you in the right direction for a proper timeframe to acclimate the flooring. If the humidity fluctuates quite a bit in your home, the timeframe is very complicated because the wood will shrink and swell with the humidity levels. In my experience with this product, a good amount of the product after 34 days of acclimation in a dry environments yielded about 15% of warp, 5-8% unusable. I had to use scrap and a pry bar to tighten the flooring into the groove before nailing. The finish is not great and the hardness is mid-grade at best as it dents VERY easily. Hope this helps. Read Less
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Asked by
NC
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April 18, 2013
Answer: 
I believe it is recommended to leave the product in the original packages, stacked neatly as high as is safe, together. The amount of time is about 2-3 days, though the longer you wait the better. Make sure it's in the room or at least close to the installation location. For example, staging it in the garage and then bringing it in to the site will not allow for proper adjustment.
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Asked by
Staten Island, NY, USA
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February 24, 2013
Answer: 
about 24 hours..... I also open the one side end of boxes to get room air to the planks
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Asked by
Delaware, USA
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January 16, 2013
Answer: 
Depends on the amount of difference in temperature and humidity between your install location and where it was purchased. If similar, just a few days. If not I would wait a week
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Asked by
Massachusetts, USA
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November 25, 2012
Answer: 
Personally, I let the wood sit inside the house for about 5 days. Most people will say anywhere from a few days to about a week. When installing, create variations in the pattern by picking pieces from different boxes. If not, the floors might come out plain or uniform-like if you use all the pieces from a single box at time.
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Asked by
ATL
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July 30, 2012
Answer: 
3 days is best!
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Asked by
Read all my Q&A
July 4, 2012
Answer: 
3 days - I followed manufacturer's guidline of opening all packages and stacking the flooring all spread out on Friday afternoon for a Monday AM installation.
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Asked by
Lancaster, PA
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June 19, 2012
Answer: 
Armstrong would recommend to test the moisture in the subfloor and in the back of the wood flooring product. The readings need to be within 4% for strip and 3% for plank before installing the floor.
Here is the information from our installation instructions:
Solid hardwood flooring should be stored in the environment in which it is expected to perform. Deliver the materials to an environmentally
Read More
Armstrong would recommend to test the moisture in the subfloor and in the back of the wood flooring product. The readings need to be within 4% for strip and 3% for plank before installing the floor.
Here is the information from our installation instructions:
Solid hardwood flooring should be stored in the environment in which it is expected to perform. Deliver the materials to an environmentally controlled site. The wood subflooring must not exceed 13% moisture content. Using a reliable wood moisture meter, measure and document the moisture content of both subfloor and hardwood flooring to determine proper moisture content with a reliable wood moisture meter. The difference in moisture content of the wood subfloor and the hardwood flooring must not exceed 4% (3% for plank). Acclimate the hardwood flooring on or off the job, as necessary, to meet these requirements. Store in a dry place, being sure to provide at least a four-inch air space under cartons which are stored upon "on-grade" concrete floors. Flooring should not be delivered until the building has been enclosed, with windows and doors in place and until cement work, plastering and other "wet" work is complete and dry. Concrete should be at least 60 days old.
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Asked by
Lancaster, PA
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June 19, 2012
Answer: 
Permanent air conditioning and heating systems should be in place and operational. Installation sites should have a consistent room temperature of 60°-75° (16°-24° C) and humidity of 35-55% for 14 days prior and during installation and until occupied.
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8 answers

Is this hardwood "hard-wood"?

This question is from Plano Marsh Oak 3/4 in. Thick x 2-1/4 in. Wide x Random Length Solid Hardwood Flooring (20 sq. ft. / case)
Asked by
Eddie
North Plainfield, NJ
February 21, 2013
I read some comments saying this floor is as soft as pine wood, which is very soft, does the hardwood floor become harder as time passes?
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Answers (8)

Asked by
Branchland, West Virginia 25506
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July 6, 2016
Answer: 
It is oak and believe me oak is hard.
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Asked by
MD
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February 23, 2015
Answer: 
It's not as hard as you would expect of oak flooring. I would have preferred other flooring after my experience with this product.
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Asked by
Martinsburg, WV, USA
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May 7, 2013
Answer: 
This floor isn't as soft as pine. It's oak, which is much harder than pine. The comments refer to the fact that the urethane finish used isn't as hard and durable as what is used on the more expensive floors. And what makes it worse is that this is a very high gloss floor, so it shows up imperfections very easily.
The floor is durable. But it's going to show "dings" and "dents" especially if you have Read More
This floor isn't as soft as pine. It's oak, which is much harder than pine. The comments refer to the fact that the urethane finish used isn't as hard and durable as what is used on the more expensive floors. And what makes it worse is that this is a very high gloss floor, so it shows up imperfections very easily.
The floor is durable. But it's going to show "dings" and "dents" especially if you have dogs. Read Less
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Asked by
Savannah, GA, USA
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February 24, 2013
Answer: 
Yes it is. I have had it down in my house now about a year. I have two kids and 3 dogs this floor holds up very well.Will be putting throughout the rest of the house
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Asked by
Staten Island, NY, USA
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February 24, 2013
Answer: 
No its not as soft as pine wood , but not as hard as maple about a 3 out of 5 ... when i install it i tell clients to use felt pads under very heavy items for easy moving and preventing dents in wood ....
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Asked by
NC
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February 22, 2013
Answer: 
It is solid oak hardwood. Oak is hard. I don't know why anyone would comment that this product is soft.
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Asked by
Lancaster, PA
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February 22, 2013
Answer: 
Hardwood is a natural product, so any dents, scratches, etc can be done to any hardwood flooring. With this product, the finish is only a Dura Luster (which is just a urethane coating); unlike our other hardwood flooring that contains aluminum oxide crystals cured into the finish making it extra durable and extra scratch resistant. Also, with this hardwood...it is a builders grade material. So expect Read More
Hardwood is a natural product, so any dents, scratches, etc can be done to any hardwood flooring. With this product, the finish is only a Dura Luster (which is just a urethane coating); unlike our other hardwood flooring that contains aluminum oxide crystals cured into the finish making it extra durable and extra scratch resistant. Also, with this hardwood...it is a builders grade material. So expect more waste, which is why we recommend to order 10% more to your total square footage. Read Less
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Asked by
Delaware, USA
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February 21, 2013
Answer: 
This is solid oak which is much harder than pine. If you make dents in this wood you would need to do it on purpose. Pine can be marked with your finger nail; oak you cannot.
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8 answers

how do you install nail down 3/4 flooring on concrete

This question is from Plano Marsh Oak 3/4 in. Thick x 2-1/4 in. Wide x Random Length Solid Hardwood Flooring (20 sq. ft. / case)
Asked by
cowboy
baltimore
May 6, 2012
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Answers (8)

Asked by
Branchland, West Virginia 25506
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July 6, 2016
Answer: 
You have an underlayment that goes down for application to concrete.
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Asked by
MD
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
February 23, 2015
Answer: 
That all depends on the moisture level of the floor. It would be recommended to use a pre-engineered floating subfloor with a moisture barrier or lay down pressure treated sleepers, insulate with rigid foam and deck it with 3/4 t&g subfloor.
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Asked by
Aurora Ohio
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October 18, 2014
Answer: 
I would not recommend this type of flooring installed over concrete unless you're prepared to do a lot of work installing stringers every 16" to nail it too. I have seen this type of flooring installed in Outback Steakhouses in the 90's over concrete and they glued it down but it was very difficult to manage and nearly impossible to get the seam tight. This grade of flooring would never be able to be Read More
I would not recommend this type of flooring installed over concrete unless you're prepared to do a lot of work installing stringers every 16" to nail it too. I have seen this type of flooring installed in Outback Steakhouses in the 90's over concrete and they glued it down but it was very difficult to manage and nearly impossible to get the seam tight. This grade of flooring would never be able to be pulled tight with nails on a concrete floor without wood stringers. The wood stringers would need to be glued and screwed into the concrete floor and once secure you could install hardwood flooring nailing to the stringers. I would recommend a floating pergo type flooring or better yet we've had great luck with vinyl wood planking glued to the floor. The vinyl planking is very difficult to tell it's not wood and goes over concrete very well. We use it on our slab constructed homes. The cost is about the same per sq ft as this 3/4 inch wood. Read Less
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Asked by
Delaware, USA
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January 16, 2013
Answer: 
You don't. Use engineered and float it. If you are set on hardwood you will need to build a subfloor to nail to.
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Asked by
ATL
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July 30, 2012
Answer: 
I tried and it won't work. I can only use the glue down method. Check out SKU 902538. Also gorgeous and an alternative.
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Asked by
Lancaster, PA
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June 7, 2012
Answer: 
In order to install solid hardwood flooring over concrete, we recommend the following installation recommendations:
Fastened to concrete:
Concrete must be of high compressive strength, 3000 PSI or better. Install a suitable moisture retardant followed by a plywood subfloor with a minimum thickness of 3/4" (19 mm). Allow 1/2" (13 mm) expansion space around all vertical objects and 1/8" (3 mm) between all
Read More
In order to install solid hardwood flooring over concrete, we recommend the following installation recommendations:
Fastened to concrete:
Concrete must be of high compressive strength, 3000 PSI or better. Install a suitable moisture retardant followed by a plywood subfloor with a minimum thickness of 3/4" (19 mm). Allow 1/2" (13 mm) expansion space around all vertical objects and 1/8" (3 mm) between all flooring panels. In general, smaller panels [less than 4' x 8' (1.2 m x 2.4 m)] oriented at 45 degrees (preferred) offer better results. The panel must be properly attached to the subfloor using a minimum of one fastener per square foot and more if necessary. Use pneumatic or powder actuated fasteners. Do not hand nail the subfloor with concrete nails. Install a moisture retardant barrier with joints lapped 6" (15 cm) and begin installation of flooring using 1 1/2" (4 cm) fasteners.
Floating subfloor :
Install a suitable moisture retardant followed by a plywood subfloor with a minimum thickness of 3/8" (9.5 mm) [1/2" (13 mm) preferred]. Allow 1/2" (13 mm) expansion space around all vertical objects and 1/8" (3 mm) between all flooring panels. Install a second layer of plywood, the same thickness, at a right angle to the previous panels, offsetting the joints 2' (61 cm). Staple together with staples that will not penetrate the first layer of subfloor. The staples should have a crown width of 3/8" (9.5 mm) or more. Install a moisture retardant barrier with joints lapped 6" (15 cm) and begin installation of flooring using 1-1/2" (4 cm) fasteners.
Screeds/sleepers:
Solid wood flooring exceeding 4" (10 cm) and above in width cannot be installed directly to screeds. Screeds should be installed 9" (23 cm) apart in rivers of adhesive, at right angles to the flooring to be installed. Do not begin installation until all adhesives are properly cured. Install moisture retardant over the screeds prior to installation of the flooring.
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Asked by
Lancaster, PA
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June 7, 2012
Answer: 
Please follow the installation instructions, which are listed in the link below. You will need to add 10% extra material to your purchase, due to the 5% extra waste allowance.
http://www.floorexpert.com/Armstrong/fpoxpert.nsf/fa8b05540df3359785256eba00710744/ebdb0702e897b187852571c500641c2f?OpenDocument
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Asked by
SteelToes
Chicago IL
May 7, 2012
Answer: 
Hello and thank you for your question.
Depending on the flooring type, you can either glue it down or nail it on plywood base.Typically base its built out of plywood sheets fastened to the PT2x4s laid flat on concrete.Not every solid flooring can be installed over concrete, you really need to follow manufacturers recommendation when it comes to moisture testing and installation method in order to keep Read More
Hello and thank you for your question.
Depending on the flooring type, you can either glue it down or nail it on plywood base.Typically base its built out of plywood sheets fastened to the PT2x4s laid flat on concrete.Not every solid flooring can be installed over concrete, you really need to follow manufacturers recommendation when it comes to moisture testing and installation method in order to keep product warrantied.
Hope this helps,
George Read Less
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Customer Reviews

Rated 3.9 out of 5 by 97 reviewers.
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by So Many Bad Quality Wood per Box- Not worth the extra time and frustration! I purchased 70 cases and installed it myself. Had to returned many boxes. Thank god Home Depot's return policy is so great. Box stated, 80% premium quality per box- absolutely not true! Maybe 45% usable wood-honestly. Even after sorting out all the bad wood- a lot of the usable wood panels are not straight- therefore making the instillation so difficult and the outcome not desirable. Very disappointed. Maybe the salesperson at Home Depot meant well to save me money... but in the long run, I would purchase the more expensive panels next time. August 3, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Laminate or Hardwood The cost of repair and refinish of our maple H/W floors was about 7k I bought enough of the plano flooring to do all the house over. After sorting it by approximate size, the real fun began in making a "random" pattern from the random lengths. That I believe is the most time consuming but by doing it the amount of waste was almost nil I cut very few board ends and had only a half dozen pieces left over from 2k sq ft. My father does not care for the little grooves but, he does not live here. I believe that it is a beautiful floor and easy to install (buy a nailer and take your time). We are moving to a new home with carpet that will find its way to the dump and replaced with this flooring before we move in. July 2, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Great buy This is our 3rd experience with this flooring. We originally used it to replace carpeting in a small office. Last year we put down about 600 square feet in a dining room, great room combination. This year we purchased 200 square feet to use in a hallway and our master bedroom. We have always been happy with the product knowing that there would be some waste and color variation. As a 60+ year old couple we have become very proficient at installing this tongue in groove product but it often is more of an artistic project then a skill. Using the random cuts in each box we were able to arrange the lengths without much cutting which often leads to more waste. We purchased the pneumatic floor nailer as it was cheaper than renting it and it gave us more time to do the job at our pace. This year the product we purchased was of exceptional quality compared to previous years. We had almost no waste due to color variations and many of the 20 boxes we purchased contained all long boards. The pneumatic nailer cured most of the boards that had some warp. Our first project with this wood has been installed for almost 15 years and it still looks as good as the day we installed it. February 21, 2016
Rated 3.0 out of 5.0 by Quality less than expected The quality of this Bruce flooring is not as good as the Bruce flooring we had purchased in the past. Some pieces were noticeably thicker than others making them unusable. There were also several pieces that were not even the same finish. The variation in sizes of the pieces per box was very disappointing. One box would have almost all long pieces and than the next several boxes were mostly short pieces. We had more boxes of just short pieces than we had of longer ones. As you have no way of knowing what each box contained there was no way of predicting whether or not there would be enough variation to make the floor look nice. Fortunately for us some of the pieces are going to be under cabinets so we were able to make use of the too many short pieces. You needed more than the recommended extra %. I was pleased with how well the overall color of the flooring matched our older Bruce flooring. July 7, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Lucky Day I had a leak from my ice maker therefore I had floor damage on my hardwood floor. Luckily I had saved my original receipt and was able to order flooring to match the flooring I have all over my house. I was able to just replace my kitchen flooring because of the wonderful work of an experienced man. July 5, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by very easy yo install, nice finish on product The flooring looks GREAT !!! It's easy to install and only took about 2 days . July 12, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Excellent Good quality for the price. Easy to use. looks great June 29, 2016
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by I have burned better wood. The flooring is so poor that the amount that is usable is negligible. Missing tongues, the back of the groove is broken off, inconsistent color, many, many 9 - 12 inch pieces (those are the good ones), some look like wood rot, worm holes, unfilled knots that go through, Some look torn up not cut. This should be classified as Tavern grade or below. A certain Lumber flooring company sells this quality at 99 cents a foot. October 6, 2015
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