0794909171007

Englander

Model # 17-VL

Internet # 202051504

1,200 sq. ft. Wood-Burning Stove

$649.00 /each
  • Freestanding design enables versatile placement options
  • Heats up to 1,200 sq. ft.
  • Choose between brass or nickel handle for custom look (included)

FREQUENTLY BOUGHT TOGETHER

PRODUCT OVERVIEW

Model # 17-VL

Internet # 202051504

Enjoy efficient, high-tech heating with this Englander Wood-Burning Stove, expertly crafted from solid steel. It burns logs up to 16 in. long and heats up to 1,200 sq. ft., perfect for smaller homes. The high-tech design ensures safe, clean burns, while the specially-designed convection channels allow you to use the room air blower for maximum heat transfer. A non-catalytic, refractory-lined firebox delivers efficient operation and clean burning with superior insulation to keep your stove at peak performance all season long.

  • Steel construction offers long-lasting durability
  • Burns logs up to 16 in. long for impressive warmth
  • Heats areas up to 1,200 sq. ft. to ensure a cozy and comfortable living space
  • Specially-designed convection channels allow you to use the room air blower for maximum heat transfer
  • Vented design ensures safe removal of impurities to keep indoor air clean
  • High-tech design ensures safe, clean and efficient burn times
  • Non-catalytic, refractory-lined firebox offers efficient operation and clean burning with superior insulation
  • Easy to install with a 6 in. top vent
  • European styling, cast iron and glass door with hidden hinges, air wash system and spiral handles provide a sleek, handsome appearance
  • Satin black finish with both brass and nickel handles included for a custom look
  • EPA and Washington state approved for clean burns
  • Room air blower included (over $100 value) to improve air circulation

Info & Guides

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SPECIFICATIONS

Dimensions
Assembled Depth (in.) 
15.125 in 
Assembled Height (in.) 
31.75 in 
Assembled Width (in.) 
21.25 in 
Firebox depth (in.) 
8.5 
Firebox height (in.) 
12.5 
Firebox width (in.) 
18 
Product Depth (in.) 
15.125 
Product Height (in.) 
31.75 
Product Width (in.) 
21.25 
Details
Area Heated (Sq. Ft.) 
1200 
Assembly Required 
Yes 
Features 
Pedestal Base 
Material 
Steel 
Mount type 
Freestanding 
Product Weight (lb.) 
207 lb 
Returnable 
90-Day 
Vented or Vent-Free 
Vented 
Warranty / Certifications
Certifications and Listings 
1-UL Listed,EPA Approved 
Manufacturer Warranty 
Limited Warranty: Five years on firebox, One year on electrical components 

MORE PRODUCTS WITH THESE FEATURES

Area Heated (Sq. Ft.): 1001 - 2000
Features: Pedestal Base
Product Width (in.): 21.25
Product Height (in.): 31.75
Product Depth (in.): 15.125
Material: Steel
Price: $600 - $700
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28 Questions48 Answers

Customer Questions & Answers

1,200 sq. ft. Wood-Burning Stove
1,200 sq. ft. Wood-Burning Stove

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This question is from 1,200 sq. ft. Wood-Burning Stove
 
6 answers

How do you clean it with no ash drawer?

This question is from 1,200 sq. ft. Wood-Burning Stove
Asked by
VA
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October 18, 2015
The product specs say no ash drawer is included. Doesn't that make it more difficult to keep it cleaned out?
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Asked by
Richmond, MN
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
June 12, 2016
Answer: 
I have the largest of the Englander. I have never used the clean out drawer. I use a small fireplace shovel. I have a small (12"x24") metal box next to my stove where I can slide the container under the front and shovel out the coals. Should there be any hot embers in the ash I don't have to worry about a fire. It has never been a problem for me in doing it this way.
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Asked by
12758
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
April 21, 2016
Answer: 
When it is very cold and you must interrupt the heating to remove the ashes/coal in order to make room for firewood.
This stove has a teeny tiny firebox and no ash drawer... that is a big problem when one lives in a cold region. I've one mine for 2 winters and hate it. I am going to buy a larger one.
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Asked by
Warfordsburg PA
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
February 14, 2016
Answer: 
You do have to scoop the ashes out with a small ash shovel. This could be a problem if you are using the stove as your primary heat source in winter and you want it to operate more or less constantly - you have to let the fire die down to clean the ash out, and be careful to store the ash in an ash bucket (the person who says they scoop them into a paper bag must not use the stove much as it can take a Read More
You do have to scoop the ashes out with a small ash shovel. This could be a problem if you are using the stove as your primary heat source in winter and you want it to operate more or less constantly - you have to let the fire die down to clean the ash out, and be careful to store the ash in an ash bucket (the person who says they scoop them into a paper bag must not use the stove much as it can take a full day for the last coals to die!). If you want to burn the stove continuously you might go for the Englander 1800 foot model which has an ash drawer and is (as of today) actually cheaper on home depot. Read Less
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Asked by
Catskills Mtns
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January 24, 2016
Answer: 
Yes it is difficult. You have to dig the ashes out.
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Asked by
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November 20, 2015
Answer: 
Simply shovel out the ashes. Scoop ashes from front of stove to back. Pretty quick.
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Asked by
California
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
October 24, 2015
Answer: 
I use the small shovel that goes with my fireplace utensils to scoop out ashes into a paper bag. It hasn't been a problem at all to keep it clean that way. This stove uses less wood to keep everything warm, so it doesn't build up quickly.
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This question is from 1,200 sq. ft. Wood-Burning Stove
 
3 answers

Wall materials required or not?

This question is from 1,200 sq. ft. Wood-Burning Stove
Asked by
Laramie
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September 15, 2015
This will be my first wood stove so this might be a rather naive question.

If I install this stove next to a standard sheet rock wall at or more than the minimum required distance to combustible material do I still need to build a fire resistance wall or can I leave the wall as is?

I do understand that I need to place the stove on a fire resistant flooring etc.

Thanks!
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Asked by
Richmond, MN
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June 10, 2016
Answer: 
This depends on several factors, wall construction being one of them. Also, does yours have a back shield? I have a back shield on mine. Also my wall is covered with man made materials to resemble river rock. I have my stove 8in. from the shield to the rock wall and can keep my hand on the rock with no problem. While its warm it's not hot. (I've had my stove up to 1300 ') Remember it's the air Read More
This depends on several factors, wall construction being one of them. Also, does yours have a back shield? I have a back shield on mine. Also my wall is covered with man made materials to resemble river rock. I have my stove 8in. from the shield to the rock wall and can keep my hand on the rock with no problem. While its warm it's not hot. (I've had my stove up to 1300 ') Remember it's the air circulation and wall material that helps determine how close to the wall you can set it. Read Less
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Asked by
California
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October 24, 2015
Answer: 
Our stove is mounted about a foot away from regular wall materials at the back, and there hasn't been any problems with that. We ultimately plan to build a fire resistant wall as you discussed, but so far, there hasn't been any problems noted with the stove that near the wall.
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September 17, 2015
Answer: 
Hi Brian,
As long as you follow the manufactures recommendations, you will not need any special materials behind the stove.
Mike
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This question is from 1,200 sq. ft. Wood-Burning Stove
 
2 answers

Can this stove burn coal

This question is from 1,200 sq. ft. Wood-Burning Stove
Asked by
Elko Nevada
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May 21, 2016
Can this woodstove burn coal?
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Asked by
Richmond, MN
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May 22, 2016
Answer: 
No. No coal or bricketts! They give off carbon monoxide. It's also possible that the flu would not hold up under the high temp. coal gives off. The high heat could also warp the stove. Also, the ash content is far greater with coal than wood. Wet wood has an ash content of about 1-2%. "Home coal gives off about 13-15% on a wet basis. Coal stoves draft from the bottom, wood from the top. Hope this helps.
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May 22, 2016
Answer: 
No, this model cannot burn coal.
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This question is from 1,200 sq. ft. Wood-Burning Stove
 
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Does this have sealed combustion - using only outside air for combustion?

This question is from 1,200 sq. ft. Wood-Burning Stove
Asked by
Truro, MA
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March 28, 2016
It may be worded differently in you product description. Please advise if this is the case. I will need to document this with the building department in my town.
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Asked by
Richmond, MN
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June 10, 2016
Answer: 
Only to the extent that allows air coming into the fire box by the damper. The damper is set so that you cannot completely shut out outside air. Doing this would not only shut the fire off but create a lot of smoke inside the fire box. This creates creosote.
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Asked by
Richmond, MN
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
June 10, 2016
Answer: 
The blower fan at the back of the stove brings in room air. Below that is an opening that can have an intake pipe attached and run outside to bring in fresh air. This is not mandatory but recommended. Your house might be too air tight to burn properly without bringing in outside air. You can test the draw by lighting a fire and leaving the door open. If smoke comes into the room you need more air for the Read More
The blower fan at the back of the stove brings in room air. Below that is an opening that can have an intake pipe attached and run outside to bring in fresh air. This is not mandatory but recommended. Your house might be too air tight to burn properly without bringing in outside air. You can test the draw by lighting a fire and leaving the door open. If smoke comes into the room you need more air for the fire to properly burn. Read Less
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CUSTOMER REVIEWS

Rated 4.4 out of 5 by 66 reviewers.
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by good little stove with one caveat This is our second winter with this stove. We bought it because we wanted a more clean-lined, modern looking stove that didn't cost a small fortune to fit our home design. This stove fit the bill and looks great (see photo) and is 1/5 to 1/10 the price of other 'modern' stoves. It is our primary heat source for a well-insulated 1800 sq ft home and works great, keeping the house toasty warm even down into single digit temps. A couple of things to keep in mind especially for the first time stove buyer: 1. This stove doesn't have an ash drawer. that means that you have to stop feeding it and let the fire die down to clear the ash using a small shovel. For us this has to be done every day in prime heating season when we're keeping the fire going all day. If you're wanting to keep the stove going continuously, you might want to look at Englander's 1800 sq ft model which has an ash drawer. As I write this it's on sale for less than the price of this stove. 2. Read the other reviews that talk about the correct placement of the baffles at the top of the stove. I don't think Englander did a great job designing the brackets for the top baffle and it's easy for it to slip out of place, interfering with correct airflow. In my judgment the manual doesn't do a good job of explaining it, i had to call Englander to get them to walk me through it. They were very knowledgeable and helpful when I called. All in all, a great stove for the money and a great look for a modern home. February 14, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Great stove! We bought this stove for our small cabin at 7,800 feet. Our cabin is only approx. 650 sq. ft., but has tall, cathedral ceiling. We installed ourselves and followed instructions for test burns. This stove works great! Heats our cabin up quickly, and continues to give out good heat as we allow the fire to burn down. The blower also works great. We are off-grid with solar power, but only need to use the blower for a few minutes just to distribute the heat throughout the cabin evenly. One fire in the morning and one in the evening is all we need to stay comfortable! Looks and works great! Would highly recommend! March 8, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Operating the Englander 17-VL to its Fullest. Honestly I was doing it wrong, never having used an EPA stove before. Wanted to make sure I was using my Englander 17-VL to its full potential so I read up on how EPA stoves work and read through all the reviews to glean as many tips possible -Thank You All for the helpful reviews! The following will allow you to get the most from this little stove which warms our 1300sqft home: 1. Make sure the vermiculite baffle at the top is pushed all the way toward the back of the stove. It's meant to block exhaust & heat from just going up the stovepipe and to create a longer gas flow path. 2. Fully open the air control by pushing the rod all the way in towards the back of stove. 3. Start a large kindling fire with a few splits of wood added to get the stove hot. A top down fire works great. The manual states the door should be closed and tightly latched. But if you do it's much harder to get the fire going. The very slightest crack works well (just don't push the latch fully down). Once the wood is charred and the fire is going strong (about 10 minutes), you can then latch the door tight. 4. When the fire has burned down to red hot coals, open the door and rake the coals into a V shape (open to front of stove), this allows air to be pushed all the way to the back of the stove. You can now load the stove as much as you want. Best to keep the wood away from the glass to help it stay clean. 5. Close the door and latch it tightly. Do not open the door anymore unless you want a house full of smoke. The air control should still be fully open. The wood will start to smoke and may do so for a very long time all while the stove temp drops. Do not open the door. Eventually the wood will burst into flames and so will all those gasses given off. The firebox will be full of flames, top & bottom! 6. Pull the air control rod all the way out towards you (some air still goes in). The flames on the wood will almost completely go out but the gases at the top will still burn at an extremely high temp. It’s mesmerizing watching this secondary combustion. This will also allow you to get the most out of your wood. When you’re down to just red hot coals you can reload again. November 20, 2015
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by Too small Teeny Firebox that can only accommodate small logs. Burn time: 3 hours maximum. Expensive ($30) door gasket replacement. Good for occasional use in mild winters, not for the Northeast. April 17, 2016
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by 1,200 sq. ft. Wood-Burning Stove I like the little stove. it heats heat my 1400 sq ft mobile home vary good . it took me a few fires to learn how to start it and control the heat . but you have to clean the glass every day . it just seems to get duty. the blower is noisy . but I don't use it . February 16, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Sturdy, Stylist, Excellent We simply love our Englander wood stove. Though the firebox is small, it fits our little room perfectly. I just have to cut the wood to fit. Best feather is that it cleans its own glass door. The heat from the fire washes over the door keeping the glass clean. I love this. It gives us unending pleasure of looking at the flames. Hardest part of this is going to bed... I highly recommend this stove. March 11, 2015
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by This stove is a Prius, the old stove was a Yugo I have used this Englander 1200 sq. ft. stove for less than a month. It is perfect for my work shop. This stove requires little floor space. It has a small fire box and uses a tiny amount of wood. I can easily heat my shop all day with a paper grocery bag of branches and twigs. This stove has two minor issues. 1.) When opening the door for refueling, a little smoke will escape. 2.) The small fire box requires small pieces of wood that many would call kindling. For a home, I would recommend a slightly larger stove that will accept larger logs. This new stove is EPA APPROVED and is 20+ times more efficient than the stove it is replacing. The old stove was an EPA EXEMPT wood burning stove. EPA exempt stoves are NOT efficient, burn a lot of wood, don't heat well, and should not be purchased (even if free) with EPA approved stoves as affordable as this one. February 12, 2015
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by A good value for the money The stove will need to have the door slightly opened/cracked, for the best draft to start a fire. It also helped to add two feet of pipe to the chimney, on the roof, for better draft. We used small kindling and newspaper to start...a shot of charcoal lighter gives a boost. After the kindling ignites, add some dry, 2x4 scraps. When the bed of coals forms, add some dry split birch for an all night fire. Our stove did not come with a blower unit; later ones have this. The draft control is: push in for draft, pull out to close. Glass door makes coals easy to inspect. October 17, 2012
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