0856594003961

Everbilt

Model # EFLS15-HD

Internet # 205617981

Store SKU # 1001092238

1-1/2 HP Thermoplastic Sprinkler Pump

$268.00 /each
  • Pumps 4020GPH of water from lakes/streams to a sprinkler system
  • Dual voltage motor can be wired for 115V or 230V
  • Manual on/off operation, self priming

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PRODUCT OVERVIEW

Model # EFLS15-HD

Internet # 205617981

Store SKU # 1001092238

This High-Capacity pump is designed to pump water from depths up to 20 ft. for sprinkling applications. It includes a 1-1/2 HP dual voltage motor. The pump is made of corrosive resistant thermoplastic components.

California residents: see  Proposition 65 information

  • Designed to boost water pressure from city water sources or pull water from lakes or streams to irrigate
  • Pumps up to 4020 GPH
  • Dual voltage motor can operate on 115-Volt or 230-Volt
  • Pump is self-priming after initial fill with water

Info & Guides

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SPECIFICATIONS

Dimensions
Product Depth (in.) 
18.31 
Product Height (in.) 
11.81 
Product Width (in.) 
18.31 
Details
Commercial/Residential Use 
Residential 
Discharge Flow @ 0 ft. (gallons/hour) 
3600 
Head Pressure (ft.) 
20 
Inlet Connection 
Threaded female 
Outlet Connection 
Threaded female 
Product Weight (lb.) 
43.21 lb 
Returnable 
90-Day 
Voltage (volts) 
115 
Warranty / Certifications
Certifications and Listings 
CSA Listed 
Manufacturer Warranty 
1 Year 

MORE PRODUCTS WITH THESE FEATURES

Voltage (volts): 115
Discharge Flow @ 0 ft. (gallons/hour): 3000 - 4000
Price: $250 - $300
Brand: Everbilt
Review Rating: 2 & Up
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20 Questions40 Answers

Customer Questions & Answers

1-1/2 HP Thermoplastic Sprinkler Pump
1-1/2 HP Thermoplastic Sprinkler Pump

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4 answers

will this pump run on 230volts

This question is from 1-1/2 HP Thermoplastic Sprinkler Pump
Asked by
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August 14, 2015
on the homedepot website it says only 115 volts but the plumbing associate says it will run on 230 volts
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Answers (4)

February 23, 2016
Answer: 
The pump can run on 115V or 230V. Just follow the wiring instructions in the user manual for your available voltage.
Thank you for your question, the website has been updated.
Everbilt Customer Service
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Asked by
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December 18, 2015
Answer: 
A very clear wiring diagram for the different voltages is on the website with the product photos
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Asked by
Mexia Tx.
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September 1, 2015
Answer: 
If you know what you are doing will run on 220 or 110
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August 15, 2015
Answer: 
This product has a dual voltage motor.
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3 answers

I just replaced my flotech 1-1/2hp sprinkler pump with the Everbuilt 1-1/2. I can't get suction from the well.

This question is from 1-1/2 HP Thermoplastic Sprinkler Pump
Asked by
Tarpon Springs, FL
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December 20, 2015
Outlet was obstructed for awhile. New Pump run 4times w/o suction. What can I do Next?
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Answers (3)

Asked by
Mexia Tx.
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
May 16, 2016
Answer: 
Check your plumbing and foot valve
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Asked by
Chesapeake, VA
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May 9, 2016
Answer: 
Run without suction isn't as bad as run DRY.
If you ran the pump without filling the pump cavity then you may have destroyed the seal for the pump.
If the seal is bad the pump will suck air when you turn it own and will never develop the suction required to lift water into the pump.
If is is bad then when you fill the pump cavity with water you will see it drip or flow out around the where the pump
Read More
Run without suction isn't as bad as run DRY.
If you ran the pump without filling the pump cavity then you may have destroyed the seal for the pump.
If the seal is bad the pump will suck air when you turn it own and will never develop the suction required to lift water into the pump.
If is is bad then when you fill the pump cavity with water you will see it drip or flow out around the where the pump shaft goes into the pump from the motor.
The other obvious fault would be that when you installed the new pump one of the plumbing fitting on the suction side is leaking. Either a bad glue joint, or a threaded fitting without Teflon tape of sealing compound. For the glued fittings you can try wiping PVC cement all around the joint to see if you can fill it in that way. For a threaded fitting you would have to either disassemble and reassemble the fittings with tape or sealant or, if you're lucky, put some sealant around the threaded fitting in hopes it would close any suction leak.
Even a small suction leak can kill the lift on a self priming pump.
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February 23, 2016
Answer: 
The most common problem we see when the pump won't prime is a leak in the suction piping. Check all of the fittings in the suction piping for leaks. We recommend new suction piping and fixtures when you replace an existing pump. Also need to be sure the pump is primed per the user manual. Remove the prime port and fill the pump body and all of the suction piping with water before running. Use a check Read More
The most common problem we see when the pump won't prime is a leak in the suction piping. Check all of the fittings in the suction piping for leaks. We recommend new suction piping and fixtures when you replace an existing pump. Also need to be sure the pump is primed per the user manual. Remove the prime port and fill the pump body and all of the suction piping with water before running. Use a check valve or foot valve (depending on your installation type) per the manual as well. This ensures that the priming water does not run down and out of the suction piping. Feel free to contact us at the number in your manual for more assistance!
Thanks,
Everbilt Customer Service
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3 answers

what are the 2 small boxes on top of the motor housing?

This question is from 1-1/2 HP Thermoplastic Sprinkler Pump
Asked by
WPB, FL
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December 17, 2015
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Asked by
Chesapeake, VA
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May 9, 2016
Answer: 
They are capacitors.
Capacitors store electrical energy and release it quickly.
On motors like this they help provide the energy to get the motor started.
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February 23, 2016
Answer: 
Indeed those are the start and run capacitors. The start capacitor gives the motor an extra boost to get turning, then the run capacitor takes over once it is up to speed, and keeps it running smoothly.
Thanks,
Everbilt Customer Service
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Asked by
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December 18, 2015
Answer: 
They are covers for the start capacitor and the run capacitor
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3 answers

will this connect to a 1inch pvc intake pipe???

This question is from 1-1/2 HP Thermoplastic Sprinkler Pump
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November 4, 2015
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Answers (3)

February 23, 2016
Answer: 
The inlet piping and fittings need to be at least as large as the pump inlet (2 inch)
Thanks,
Everbilt Customer Service
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Asked by
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December 18, 2015
Answer: 
you should never reduce the size of the inlet pipe. It should be the same diameter as the inlet at the pump. This will cause priming problems and limit the pumps performance (if you can get it to prime)
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Asked by
Mexia Tx.
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
November 5, 2015
Answer: 
You would have to use a reducer on it as it is two inch intake.
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CUSTOMER REVIEWS

Rated 2.8 out of 5 by 21 reviewers.
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by A pump with great potential EFLS15-HD 1 ½ Horsepower Thermoplastic sprinkler pump. Background: This pump was acquired to replace a non-working cast-iron pump on an existing well. The existing pump has not worked since I purchased the house. The well is 40 feet deep with a static water level 10 feet below ground level. It is a cased well with a jet-pump configuration (two pipes). I was concerned that a well that had not been used in over 10 years might have silted in, so I pushed city water down the well for 15 minutes with no appreciable change in the static water level so I felt comfortable with the well’s operation. Due to the relatively high static water level I decided to replace the jet pump with a self-priming pump and selected the EFLS15-HD. Shipping: Response to my request was very good. The pump shipped the day after I ordered it and arrived a few days after shipping. The box arrived with no apparent damage and there was no hidden damage. Packaging: The box was exactly like the store display boxes and was strong enough to survive shipping with no damage. The pump was well secured within the box and all included materials were in a plastic bag. There were no missing or broken pieces. Unpacking: The pump is relatively large and heavy and was bolted to a bottom plate. So removing the pump was easiest by removing the packing and protective inserts and then lifting the pump and shipping base out as one unit. I did not cut the box in case there was a reason to ship the pump back. Two bolts held the pump to the shipping base and they were easy to remove once the assembly was out of the box. Installation, Plumbing: I had not checked the plumbing connection for the new pump bofor I ordered it and was concerned that it required a 2-inch inlet. The existing well uses a 1 ¼ inch riser on the suction side. I decided to plum the pump to the existing riser because the pump is located less than 10 feet from the well and the well has a relatively low lift requirement. There was a brass spring check valve located in the suction pipe which looked serviceable so I reused it. I used schedule 40 PVC pipe and fittings. I also plumbed a PVC union to the suction side of the pump to allow for quick removal in the event of repair/replacement/modification later. The brass check valve and union were both plumbed with threaded connection for ease of possible disassembly. All threaded surfaces were triple wrapped with Teflon tape prior to assembly. Discharge was a simple 1 ½ inch tee with two ¾ inch brass globe valves. I used these valves because they were on the previous pump and were still serviceable. Installation, Electrical: The electrical connection was simple. I had an existing switch box with liquid tight flexible conduit. I did replace the switch, and replaced the switch cover with a wet location switch. I also ran a new length of flexible conduit as the new installation was further from the switch box. Wiring the motor was easy but revealed the single con of the pump. There is not electrical wiring diagram anywhere on the pump. I had to get the owner’s manual to verify the wiring connections. There should be a wiring diagram on the pump motor or the inside of the connection box cover in case any repair work is required and the manual is not available. The connection box does not have a terminal board to make connections, only wire leads are visible. The leads are sufficiently long to allow wire-nutting to the power leads. I debated using crimp connectors but decided to use wire nuts due to the experimental nature of this installation. Initial run: After checking all plumbing and electrical connections I removed the prime plug and filled the pump chamber. I triple wrapped the prime plug and reinstalled it in the casing. On initial power up a rapid flow of water and air began from both faucets. However, it rapidly decreased until there was no perceptible discharge. To ensure there was no air leak in the suction side I loosed the union to introduce a known air leak. The pump began to blow water and air out both faucets again. I retightened the union and again there was no detectable discharge. I turned the pump off after one minute and stopped work for the day to do more research. I didn’t find anything that would indicate a problem with my installation so after a couple of days I went back to re-examine and test. I refilled the pump cavity and turned the pump back on. The initial outflow was the same as the first test run, but I did notice a slight discharge of air from the one faucet I had open. I surmised the initial test run might have pumped enough prime water out that the pump could not lift and that refilling the pump had put enough water back in to allow the pump to continue the priming process. I checked the discharge for a continued air flow and it was continuing to pump a slight amount of air. I let the pump continue to run while I monitored the motor temperature, pump hosing temperature, and discharge. After about 3 minutes the pump began to prime. After another minute or so it began to flow. At this point I had both faucets open. I decided to close one faucet to create a backpressure on the pump to prevent cavitation. This seemed to greatly improve the flow. By carefully controlling how quickly I opened the second faucet I could get a good stream of water. Second run: A few minutes after the initial run I hooked a short length of hose to one faucet to measure flow rate. It took the pump about 2 minutes to prime again so I think it is possible the check valve is not functioning and will look to replace it in the future. After a good flow was established I filled a 15-gallon drum. It took 100 seconds for a flow rate of about 9 gallons per minute. This is considerably below the flow rate I expected at a 10-foot lift. However, there are other factors that may be affecting the flow. I will continue to monitor the pump operation and may revise my review if necessary. Conclusion: The EFLS15-HD is a nice pump that can provide more water flow than I need for my ½ acre lot. But the current flow rate is entirely adequate for my need. I recommend that any purchaser should review the performance specifications of any of the pumps in this series to ensure they pick the power appropriate for their application. May 9, 2016
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by leaked at shaft within a year leaking after a year, poor quality. I don't recommend this pump May 6, 2016
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by Doesn't last Bought first pump last year and it lasted 2 weeks. Took it back and got another one and it just locked up, lasted 13 months. May 9, 2016
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by Garbage Ever built pump are lasting 3-12 months if your lucky. I'm a sprinkler contractor and I've replaced 18 pumps that were practically brand new in the last 3 months. Keep making me $$$ ever built. April 14, 2016
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by I would not recommed this pump I had this pump installed in Oct/2015 and had to replace it Feb/20016. I only water 2 times a week and had it turned off for about 6 weeks through the holidays. it runs very hot and very loud. it got so hot it melted the wiring inside the pump. DoNot buy this pump. i would have given a lower rating but poor is the lowest. March 3, 2016
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by These Pumps are Junk I installed this pump for my sprinkler system and used it exactly 6 times before it failed. During those times before it failed it worked great although it was very loud. The last time it ran I noticed the pressure was very low coming out of my sprinkler heads and the pump became extremely loud. So I checked the impeller to make sure it wasn't clogged with something. It wasn't so I checked the inflow pipe to make sure it wasn't clogged. It wasn't. So I replaced the back flow check valve in case it was bad and hooked the pump back up, primed it and ran it. A few minutes after turning it on there was a bang in the pump and it froze up. I checked the impeller and it was stripped and the diverter plate was cracked. Apparently there was a problem with the impeller and that's why the pressure dropped. The entire pump feels cheap. I think it's poorly designed with a clamp that holds the body of the pump together. That just screams leak eventually. The impeller and diverter are made of cheap plastic and the plug for the prime hole is cheap plastic. Next I will try a Red Lion pump. It costs more but the build quality looks to be much better than this piece of junk. February 29, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Best Deal I Could Find I replaced a 10 yr old similar unit, so it was pretty much just R&R. This thing moves a lot of water and has great pressure. I imagine we will get as good of service as we did the first one. July 28, 2015
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by Replaced a quality pump with this model The pump delivers great pressure however it is very very noisy. It would be acceptable if installed in a remote area. Time will tell how long this pump will last. Disappointed in the excessive noise. I would not recommend if installing near any home or dwelling. February 14, 2016
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