Model # SP05002VD

Internet #204478339

Store SKU #1000026682

Everbilt 1/2 HP Submersible Sump Pump

Everbilt

1/2 HP Submersible Sump Pump

$189.00 /each

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Product Overview

The Everbilt 1/2 HP stainless steel/cast-iron submersible sump pump is ideal for use in rugged applications. The oil-filled, high-efficiency PSC motor is equipped with durable ball bearings and automatic thermal protection. An innovative reed sensor vertical float switch provides performance reliability.

  • Stainless steel motor housing, rugged cast-iron volute and seal plate maximizes pump life
  • Innovative reed sensor vertical float switch provides performance reliability
  • Permanent lubricated ball bearings for quiet performance, free of maintenance
  • Top suction design filters debris and minimizes clogging

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Customer Questions & Answers

1/2 HP Submersible Sump Pump
1/2 HP Submersible Sump Pump

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This question is from 1/2 HP Submersible Sump Pump
 
6 answers

Is it posible to rotate and flip the float bracket so the pump runs longer opposed to more often?

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Asked by
Littlestown,Pa.
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December 13, 2014
We hit a spring when we built a new addition and the sump pump cycles every 20 seconds or so. I'm thinking if I flip the bracket and rotate it towards the cord I could have the pit fill higher before the pump recycles. Thus saving the start stops and posibly allowing the pump to last longer. I am replacing the pumps, on average, every four months. Or perhaps you may have a better solution, besides digging it out to daylight. (not enough fall) Thanks!
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Answers (6)

Asked by
woodstock ny
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
June 23, 2015
Answer: 
If you need a larger hysteresis (i.e. distance between on and off), another solution would be get an after market electronic, solid state, water level sensor made just for this kind of situation. You would first put the existing float sensor in the "on" position by zip tying or other securing method, then you would put the power plug into the receptacle A/C socket on the after market electronic water Read More
If you need a larger hysteresis (i.e. distance between on and off), another solution would be get an after market electronic, solid state, water level sensor made just for this kind of situation. You would first put the existing float sensor in the "on" position by zip tying or other securing method, then you would put the power plug into the receptacle A/C socket on the after market electronic water level sensor device. Then you manually position the two sensors that come with the after market device, one where you want the water level to turn it on, and the other where you want it to turn off. You then have full control of where it goes on and off.
A good one for example is HC6000-Hi-Lo-Controller-Float-Switch
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Asked by
Skagit County, WA, USA
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April 15, 2015
Answer: 
It is possible, but you'll risk burning the pump when the pit runs dry.
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Asked by
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
April 4, 2015
Answer: 
I have the same problem. I have not researched magnetic switches yet. I am thinking if you flipped the bracket over. Which will raise it higher. You still need to extend or lengthen the 1/2" round plastic rod that the float rides up and down on. It will travel the same discharging the same amount. This needs a longer travel.
But I assume the inductive feild inside of it, or the magnetic field? cannot be
Read More
I have the same problem. I have not researched magnetic switches yet. I am thinking if you flipped the bracket over. Which will raise it higher. You still need to extend or lengthen the 1/2" round plastic rod that the float rides up and down on. It will travel the same discharging the same amount. This needs a longer travel.
But I assume the inductive feild inside of it, or the magnetic field? cannot be modified.
Read Less
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Asked by
Paramus, NJ
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January 10, 2015
Answer: 
clydemfb Thats sounds like a good creative solution. I looked at my pump and you could flip it/ possibly bend it,, Or even pick up an angle bracket and make it work. If you do it please let us know how you made out
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Asked by
Waldorf, MD
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December 23, 2014
Answer: 
Rotating the bracket will only give you another inch or 2 of travel and that won't make much of a difference. Hitting a spring is always going to be a problem unless you can reduce or redirect some of its flow. The best way is to get another pump with a tethered float.
Extending the float bar travel will work but I really wouldn't do it on THIS pump because the on/off mechanism may not work correctly. Read More
Rotating the bracket will only give you another inch or 2 of travel and that won't make much of a difference. Hitting a spring is always going to be a problem unless you can reduce or redirect some of its flow. The best way is to get another pump with a tethered float.
Extending the float bar travel will work but I really wouldn't do it on THIS pump because the on/off mechanism may not work correctly. Pumps with regular electrical switches are an easy conversion but this one uses a cheap plastic shaft and you'd have to glue or melt an extension onto it. Plus, I haven't taken it apart to see if it uses an electronic or mechanical switch. Only attempt this if you know how and are capable of doing it safely and correctly. First, raise the pump as high as you need to then measure the length of shaft needed then extend the shaft with the same size & type of plastic that the original is made from. There cannot be any burrs or interference with the travel of the float or it WILL jam and cause BIG problems. My advice is to get another pump with a tethered float.
After extending the shaft you must then put bricks or other types of blocks under the pump to raise it up in the hole. Doing this ALONE (without a shaft extension) won't extend the run time because, once the water fills the hole and activates the pump, it won't fully drain out. Extending the shaft AND raising the pump will fix your issue. Again, I recommend a tethered float.
If it is out of warranty and you know what you're doing electrically, you can change out the vertical float to a tethered type float. I really don't advise this (unless you really know what you're doing) due to the possibility of not resealing the electrical connections enough so as not to be a hazard. Tethered floats work the best (IMO) and are easily adjustable. Read Less
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Asked by
Everywhere, USA
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
December 19, 2014
Answer: 
I would not modify the bracket holding the float, rather, why not just add bricks or cinder blocks to gain the height you want.
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This question is from 1/2 HP Submersible Sump Pump
 
5 answers

How high is the water level before the pump kicks in

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Asked by
walnut creek, ca
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November 8, 2014
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Answers (5)

Asked by
woodstock ny
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June 23, 2015
Answer: 
About 7-8 inches off the bottom of the pump.
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Asked by
Paramus, NJ
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January 10, 2015
Answer: 
In my sump, the water level has to reach about 1 inch before it kicks on
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Asked by
Waldorf, MD
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December 23, 2014
Answer: 
The float has to make contact with the top switch to turn the pump on. Measure from the bottom of the pump to the bottom of the switch. It is about 9 inches.
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Asked by
Willow Grove, Pa
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December 11, 2014
Answer: 
The pump kicks in at the proper water level. That's not the problem. The issues is the pump will not stop running even after the water has been pumped out.
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Asked by
Louisburg, Kansas
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November 10, 2014
Answer: 
pump will activate when water reaches approximately 8 inches high
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4 answers

Why will my pump not turn off after it empties the sump pit?

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Asked by
S.Plainfield, NJ
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January 26, 2015
This is a brand new pump which has been installed according to the directions and has a check valve. It turns on but will not turn off even when the float is at the end.
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Asked by
Green Bay, WI
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April 4, 2016
Answer: 
Same thing happened to mine. Switch was faulty. Returned and bought a different brand.
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Asked by
woodstock ny
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June 23, 2015
Answer: 
Probably means the magnet sensor that detects the height of the float is not working, either the float is stuck in some position or the sensor itself is not detecting it properly.
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Asked by
Waterville, Maine
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April 22, 2015
Answer: 
defective float switch
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Asked by
Paramus, NJ
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January 30, 2015
Answer: 
Have you checked that the float is moving freely on the shaft ?? And is not blocked by anything, It must go all the way to the bottom for the pump to shut off, if it still doesn't shut off its possible the float switch is defective.
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This question is from 1/2 HP Submersible Sump Pump
 
2 answers

Should an air bleed hole be drilled (1/8") in the discharge pipe to prevent the pump from air locking?

This question is from 1/2 HP Submersible Sump Pump
Asked by
Colorado
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December 22, 2014
Many sump pumps require an air bleed hole in the discharge pipe to prevent air locking. I am using a check valve and the installation instructions do not state this requirement. However, most sump pumps require the 1/8" hole to prevent the pump from air locking.
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Asked by
Paramus, NJ
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January 10, 2015
Answer: 
I've been running my pump for about 6 months and haven't had an airlock problem yet, You could always drill the hole and if it creates a problem just put an oversized sheet metal screw in the hole to close it....
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Asked by
Waldorf, MD
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December 23, 2014
Answer: 
This is such an overrated issue when it really doesn't have to be. As long as the pump is operated a few times under water, as long as there is an anti siphon valve and as long as it isn't run dry after that, air locking won't be an issue. So, just to be safe, drill the tiny hole. Many of the anti siphon valves (Sears) come with the hole already drilled in the valve sleeve. It is small so look for it. I Read More
This is such an overrated issue when it really doesn't have to be. As long as the pump is operated a few times under water, as long as there is an anti siphon valve and as long as it isn't run dry after that, air locking won't be an issue. So, just to be safe, drill the tiny hole. Many of the anti siphon valves (Sears) come with the hole already drilled in the valve sleeve. It is small so look for it. I found some of the holes drilled in the threads so look carefully and make sure not to screw the valve all the way down into the base of the pump or the hole will be covered. If that happens, just drill another hole a few inches up. Run the pump a few times and you should be fine after that. I've had pumps run just fine with and without the hole because I make sure to prime them a few times. Priming is running water in hole long enough for the pump to cycle on & off a few times. Finally remember this: Pumps can dry out during times of drought. Check the pump often to make sure it always has water covering the intake or air locking CAN happen. If it does, simply run water into the hole as directed above to re-prime it. Read Less
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Customer Reviews

Rated 3.6 out of 5 by 39 reviewers.
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by Didn't Last Worked for a month and then went out. Waste of money. September 5, 2016
Rated 2.0 out of 5.0 by easy to install however bought in june 2016 took back in july 2016 plastic float stopped working and it began to rust August 1, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Good operating sump. Easy to install Sump pump was easy to install. It is a quiet running pump. Removes water promptly and quietly. July 5, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Great Pump Great pump. Well built and easy to install with the kit. June 7, 2016
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by Terrible product Terrible product, first one stopped working in less than 24 hours, bought second one and that one stopped working in one day. Returned that one and bought one at Menards, better product and less money. Didn't get plumber's charge back even though store manager Ron said he would. Terrible product and customer service. June 7, 2016
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by Two bad float sensors in a row My old sump pump died after 20 inches of wet spring snow started to melt off, causing the pump to cycle about every four minutes. Of course it died in the middle of the night so I had to manually pump the water out. Dashed to Home Depot first thing in the morning, liked the magnetic switch on this one (I suspect the mechanical float switch was what actually failed on the old pump), and rushed home to install it. Worked great. Unfortunately, two days later the sensor failed in the "on" position and the motor ran endlessly. Figured it was a fluke, exchanged for another identical sump pump. Installed it, worked great, for about the six or seven hour lifetime of the sensor. I checked it at 11:00 pm, all was well. Came downstairs at 8:00 am, pump was running without stop. Impressive that the motor didn't burn out in what was probably at least six hours of dry-pumping, but extremely unimpressive that another float sensor failed in just a few hours (at least it was in the "on" position). A three-year warranty? I didn't get a total of three days out of two of them. I'm not going to try for a third failure, looking for a different pump. On the plus side, I'm getting really fast at changing dead sump pumps. April 24, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Very good Easy to install, and quiet.Sales Help at store was a wealth of info. May 5, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Great pump Came with adapter to be able to use different size of discharge pipes. May 3, 2016
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