0852205005003

Everbilt

Model SF20

Internet #204733081

Store SKU #1000027544

Store SO SKU #181011

18 in. x 22 in. Sump Pump Basin

$23.68 /each
  • Heavy duty, ultra strong, will not flex or collapse
  • Covers can be bolted to basin providing safety
  • Gas and radon tight when used with Model # SF2000E

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Product Overview

For sump applications, the Everbilt 18 in. x 22 in. Sump Pump Basin is designed to hold a sump pump. It is ideal for basement applications where a submersible or pedestal sump pump is required. The basin is injection molded structural foam polyethylene and provides superior structural toughness and reliability. The rim of the basin includes pre-drilled holes with metal inserts to accept the mounting and securing of a cover. The cover for the basin is sold separately. The basin has a 22 gal. capacity.

  • 18 in. diameter x 22 in. deep
  • Industry's toughest sump basin
  • Use for sump applications
  • Heavy duty construction
  • Injection molded structural foam polyethylene
  • Cover mounting inserts included on basin
  • Cover sold separately

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Customer Questions & Answers

11 Questions25 Answers

Customer Questions & Answers

18 in. x 22 in. Sump Pump Basin
18 in. x 22 in. Sump Pump Basin

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This question is from 18 in. x 22 in. Sump Pump Basin
 
8 answers

How does the water get in?

This question is from 18 in. x 22 in. Sump Pump Basin
Asked by
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December 21, 2014
I'm totally new to this....I can't see where the ground water would enter the basin.
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Answers (8)

Asked by
Buffalo, NY
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August 26, 2016
Answer: 
This basin is designed to collect the water from under your basement floor. a 4" corrugated drain tile (black plastic slotted pipe that comes in 100' and 250' coils and can be cut to length with a razor knife) is laid into a bed of stone along side the footing under your basement floor. That collects the water and channels into this crock. The sump pump sits in the bottom of this basin/crock and pumps Read More
This basin is designed to collect the water from under your basement floor. a 4" corrugated drain tile (black plastic slotted pipe that comes in 100' and 250' coils and can be cut to length with a razor knife) is laid into a bed of stone along side the footing under your basement floor. That collects the water and channels into this crock. The sump pump sits in the bottom of this basin/crock and pumps when the water reaches a certain level (that can be adjusted). the holes on the top of the lid are to pump the water out of this basin...up through 1 1/2 inch pvc pipe to the outside of your house. Once you dig a hole that fits the crock/basin in to the ground dso the top of it is about 3.5 inches above your footing (or flush with your basement floor), you then lay around the 4 inch perforated tile and then at the level and location where that would connect nto this basin, you drill a pilot hole and use a saw to cut out two holes large enough to bring the corrugated pipe right into the basin...it can extend into the basin. Read Less
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Asked by
Alexandria, VA
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May 10, 2016
Answer: 
This sump has no openings other than the top. You would normally have drain pipes entering through the top lid.
I am using mine as a backyard low point rain collector with a sump pump installed to pump it to retention barrels to use as irrigation. Therefore, I drilled many holes in the bottom to let water seep in from corrugated black plastic pipe from other low points. I used permanent landscape Read More
This sump has no openings other than the top. You would normally have drain pipes entering through the top lid.
I am using mine as a backyard low point rain collector with a sump pump installed to pump it to retention barrels to use as irrigation. Therefore, I drilled many holes in the bottom to let water seep in from corrugated black plastic pipe from other low points. I used permanent landscape fabric and then back filled with gravel to prevent soil from entering the sump. Read Less
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March 17, 2016
Answer: 
I bought this same basin. I took a 1/4 drill bit and drilled 108 holes all around and through the bottom of the basin. I took some landscape fabric and wrapped the basin including the bottom and stapled the fabric to the basin. In the bottom of the pit I put about 6 inches of pea gravel and set the basin into ground level with the top. Then filled in around the basin with about 4 inches of pea gravel. Read More
I bought this same basin. I took a 1/4 drill bit and drilled 108 holes all around and through the bottom of the basin. I took some landscape fabric and wrapped the basin including the bottom and stapled the fabric to the basin. In the bottom of the pit I put about 6 inches of pea gravel and set the basin into ground level with the top. Then filled in around the basin with about 4 inches of pea gravel. The landscape fabric keeps all debris out but water. Also the sealed lid works great to run a radon vent system along with water discharge line out. Read Less
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Asked by
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
January 18, 2016
Answer: 
You can use a couple different methods.
1. Use a hole saw to create an inlet into the side of the basin. This will require an inlet hub to create a seal.
2. If you're using this is in a drainage project you can drill into the side wall to allow water to enter the basin. I would recommend using a 5/8 bit to create vertical rows going all the way around the basin but leave about a 1 to 2 inch gap from the
Read More
You can use a couple different methods.
1. Use a hole saw to create an inlet into the side of the basin. This will require an inlet hub to create a seal.
2. If you're using this is in a drainage project you can drill into the side wall to allow water to enter the basin. I would recommend using a 5/8 bit to create vertical rows going all the way around the basin but leave about a 1 to 2 inch gap from the top of the basin.
3. If you just have a hose running off a condensate pump or something similar you can just enter in through the top.
Read Less
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Asked by
Elk Grove, CA
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
June 30, 2015
Answer: 
You can use it as a low point to collect piped water, then pump out (which is my application). Or drill holes (1/4" - 3/8") in the base of the sump if you are keeping subslab seepage or high water table at bay. Just make sure to wrap some felt or filter fabric around the basin if drilling holes, and set in a fine sand (#60 or playground sand) filter pack, to keep the bulk of fine sediment from getting Read More
You can use it as a low point to collect piped water, then pump out (which is my application). Or drill holes (1/4" - 3/8") in the base of the sump if you are keeping subslab seepage or high water table at bay. Just make sure to wrap some felt or filter fabric around the basin if drilling holes, and set in a fine sand (#60 or playground sand) filter pack, to keep the bulk of fine sediment from getting into basin (and then through your pump). Read Less
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Asked by
Long Island NY
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
April 9, 2015
Answer: 
Holes must be drilled into sides and bottom.
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Asked by
Silverdale, WA
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
December 30, 2014
Answer: 
I used this in my Crawlspace, I dug a hole that was deep enough to fit the basin up to the lip of the basin, also you need to make sure the hole is big enough to fit anywhere from 4 to 6 inches of pea gravel around the outside of the basin, then I drilled 8 1/4 inch holes in the basin to allow water to enter the basin, 4 holes around the mid and 4 around the top of the basin. I should of done 4 more Read More
I used this in my Crawlspace, I dug a hole that was deep enough to fit the basin up to the lip of the basin, also you need to make sure the hole is big enough to fit anywhere from 4 to 6 inches of pea gravel around the outside of the basin, then I drilled 8 1/4 inch holes in the basin to allow water to enter the basin, 4 holes around the mid and 4 around the top of the basin. I should of done 4 more holes around 3 to 4 inches from the bottom. Make sure you have enough Pea gravel, the gravel will stop the mud from coming into the basin. also I place about 2 inches of pea gravel inside the basin and placed a flat stone on top of the pea gravel and that is what supports my sump pump. Read Less
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Asked by
Silverdale, WA
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
December 30, 2014
Answer: 
I drilled holes in the basin, I only drilled 8 1/4 inch holes around the mid and top of the Basin, Make sure you dig the hole wide enough to allow atleast 4 to 6 inches of pea gravel around the entire basin, this will help keep mud and debri out of the Basin.
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This question is from 18 in. x 22 in. Sump Pump Basin
 
3 answers

Is the basin food safe plastic?

This question is from 18 in. x 22 in. Sump Pump Basin
Asked by
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October 21, 2015
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Asked by
Alexandria, VA
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May 10, 2016
Answer: 
I don't think so. You should go to a restaurant supply house to get food safe items. There are some ridged inside the sump that would be hard to keep clean.
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January 18, 2016
Answer: 
No it is not
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Asked by
Great Falls, Montana
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October 24, 2015
Answer: 
No.
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This question is from 18 in. x 22 in. Sump Pump Basin
 
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Can this be used as a sewage basin?

This question is from 18 in. x 22 in. Sump Pump Basin
Asked by
Windham
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March 29, 2016
Home Depot sells a sewage basin that's 8" deeper and costs more than twice as much as this basin - just wondering if I could save myself some digging and money by going with this item - thanks!
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Asked by
Alexandria, VA
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May 10, 2016
Answer: 
As a sewage sump with a sanitary sump pump, yes. It has an available matching lid that is vapor tight specifically for this purpose.
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Asked by
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March 31, 2016
Answer: 
Yes you could use this for sewage together with a lid like this one (http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-18-in-Tank-Cover-for-Sewage-Basin-SF2000E/204733083?keyword=sf2000e). However you should consult your local plumbing codes to ensure that they permit using a smaller basin for sewage.
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This question is from 18 in. x 22 in. Sump Pump Basin
 
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can it be buried up to 2' outdoors?

This question is from 18 in. x 22 in. Sump Pump Basin
Asked by
Nashville, TN
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March 15, 2016
I have not only a massive pinpoint low spot with multiple downspouts and several yards and a field all draining into the same low spot. The neighbor's foundation is even becoming water logged so I wanted to bury this thing at least a few feet deep to catch not only new runoff but also any saturated ground water already present. Will the lid and liner be able to hold the weight from the soil on top?

Thanks,
D
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Asked by
Alexandria, VA
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May 10, 2016
Answer: 
I would think so, it is pretty sturdy. It SHOULD NOT be used under vehicular traffic or parking though.
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Asked by
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March 17, 2016
Answer: 
Hi USARockyTop,
It is safe to bury the basin that deep. Good luck with your project.
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Customer Reviews

Rated 4.9 out of 5 by 20 reviewers.
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Very sturdy basin for indoor or outdoor use I purchased two of these for an outdoor French drain/sump pump system. These basins are very well-constructed. I bored at least forty 7/8" holes in each of them along the sides and bottoms to allow the water to enter and this had no affect on their structural integrity. The basins have four threaded holes in the top rim for bolting down your lid. Great product at a reasonable price. March 15, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by sump well The well was easy to seat into a dug-out hole at a spot where excess rain water collected. It is secured with a steel bar, placed between two concrete slabs, and has been tested against ground water hydraulic lift-out. August 9, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Excellent product, made in USA. This is an Excellent product, made of durable plastic and it is made in USA. It is good for a life time. March 23, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Good quality What can i say? It's a basin. Solid, well manufactured. July 25, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Built well and sturdy, just what we needed for the job. Worked well for a 1/2 HP sump pump, installation was straight forward. December 8, 2015
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Very sturdy sump Nice heavy gauge material. Don't anticipate any trouble with this sump, it should far outlast my lifetime. May 10, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Sump pump basin Great, heavy duty, sump basin for the money. I drilled 1/4" holes in all 3 of mine. I also purchased the matching covers which work and fit perfect. I highly recommend this basin for residential or commercial use! March 30, 2016
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by sump basin The sump basin was adequate in size but should have had holes drilled in sides for water to seep into the pit. I alleviated this by drilling my own holes and covering with weedblock material to keep the dirt out. February 24, 2016
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