0729477005409

Model INS541LD

Internet #100318635

Store SKU #211904

GreenFiber Cellulose Blow-in Insulation

$11.07 / each
If you buy 100 or more
$7.75 / each
  • Formaldehyde-free and made from 85% recycled material
  • Highly effective fire resistance
  • Reduces air infiltration and provides superior sound control

Frequently Bought Together

Product Overview

Made with up to 85% recycled paper fiber. It is easy to install and can be applied over any existing insulation. Treated with flame retardant chemicals to provide highly effective fire resistance. It fills gaps and voids and creates a seamless thermal blanket that reduces air infiltration and provides superior sound control. A no-itch material.

  • Blown into attics or sidewalls
  • Covers 40 sq. ft. per bag
  • Can be applied over any existing insulation
  • Fills gaps and voids, creating a seamless thermal blanket of protection
  • Fire-resistant
  • Formaldehyde-free and made from 85% recycled material
  • Reduces noise
  • ENERGY STAR compliant
  • Note: product may vary by store

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110 Questions124 Answers

Customer Questions & Answers

GreenFiber Cellulose Blow-in Insulation
GreenFiber Cellulose Blow-in Insulation

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7 answers

can I put this in without using the machine?

This question is from GreenFiber Cellulose Blow-in Insulation
Asked by
vermont
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September 13, 2015
I have an old attic with (I think) loose rockwool insulation. I have a floor in my attic so I have to remove each board (and vacuum dirt!) before topping off existing insulation. Then I have to move the boxes etc that I have to the finished areas, so this will take several days. I do not think that I can keep the blower machine that long and I would prefer to minimize dust, so I am hoping that I can fluff up this insulation by hand and do the project as I am able.
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Answers (7)

Asked by
syracuse, ny
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
February 25, 2016
Answer: 
If you are putting the floor back, you would be better off using unfaced fiberglass bats or buying isocyanurate or polystyrene sheets (much higher R value) and fitting them as you go.
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Asked by
Birmingham,AL
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
January 27, 2016
Answer: 
Use the blower! You will not get adequate "fluffing" or even coverage doing it by hand. The purpose of the ridged hose is to break up and "condition" the insulation so you get the maximum benefit from the material. Uneven spots or dense clumps will compromise your R value.
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Asked by
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January 2, 2016
Answer: 
One option I just used that worked well for me was a leaf blower, actually the vacuum part. Once run through the vacuum I used a stick to spread it out. My atic has space that I can stand up in and I have some floor boards that I can open the bags on. It took a bit of trial and error to have it work for me. The best was to push chunks in a handful or so at a time and let the output bounce off the floor Read More
One option I just used that worked well for me was a leaf blower, actually the vacuum part. Once run through the vacuum I used a stick to spread it out. My atic has space that I can stand up in and I have some floor boards that I can open the bags on. It took a bit of trial and error to have it work for me. The best was to push chunks in a handful or so at a time and let the output bounce off the floor boards into a big pile. I only did six bags, the machine is the way to go. Would not want to do a large space this way. Read Less
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Asked by
Arizona
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
November 28, 2015
Answer: 
If you have very much sq ft to do, doing it by hand will take forever, and be a mess, especially on you.
I would move the boxes and flooring from half the attic. Get the blower and do that half. Return the blower, and go get it again when you are ready to do the other half.
Also, I use only Owens fiberglass. It is surprisingly very clean when blowing. It doesn't settle as much as cellulose, and is a lot
Read More
If you have very much sq ft to do, doing it by hand will take forever, and be a mess, especially on you.
I would move the boxes and flooring from half the attic. Get the blower and do that half. Return the blower, and go get it again when you are ready to do the other half.
Also, I use only Owens fiberglass. It is surprisingly very clean when blowing. It doesn't settle as much as cellulose, and is a lot more fire resistant. You should have a minimum of R-30 (10.5" total) for the effectiveness to justify the cost.
Good Luck
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Asked by
MA
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
October 8, 2015
Answer: 
Yes, absolutely. I have the same situation. You wear gloves and a mask and break two large pieces off at a time, and rub them together. They'll disintegrate and rain down fine insulation to fill the cavity. You do it one floorboard at a time.
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Asked by
ny
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
October 1, 2015
Answer: 
If you had to cover a small area you could, but in order to maximize the products r value the machine should be used cause it really helps to brake it up and fluff it. Doing it by hand you will have clumps and wont be able to maximize the product. it could be possible but will be a headache and you wont be able to get a accurate r value
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Asked by
Marietta, GA
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
September 22, 2015
Answer: 
You can apply the blown insulation manually if you have room to stand up and work with a small rake and maybe a broom. The idea of the blower machine is to do the job quickly and not get insulation all in your skin. But if you have the time, you can apply the insulation by hand. Wear gloves, long sleeves and a scarf over your face... Do this in cooler weather so you won't burn up in the attic.
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6 answers

WALL INSULATION

This question is from GreenFiber Cellulose Blow-in Insulation
Asked by
COLUMBIA, SC
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September 23, 2015
I LIVE IN A OLD WOOD FRAME HOME WITH NO INSULATION CAN THIS PRODUCT BE USED TO INSULATE BETWEEN THE EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR WALL
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Answers (6)

Asked by
Indiana
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August 10, 2016
Answer: 
A very late answer and the job likely has finished long ago.
While I agree with the replies stating that it will work and drilling holes for the hose is all it takes I want warn.
You must be sure that the whole space between the studs is clear of any obstruction. The problem with old walls is that you often don't know what the look like on the inside. You may be assuming you are filling 8ft high Read More
A very late answer and the job likely has finished long ago.
While I agree with the replies stating that it will work and drilling holes for the hose is all it takes I want warn.
You must be sure that the whole space between the studs is clear of any obstruction. The problem with old walls is that you often don't know what the look like on the inside. You may be assuming you are filling 8ft high between studs but for whatever reason there may be an horizontal 2x4 somewhere in the middle.
Meaning you insulated half of your wall.
Walls that have filled and torn down quite often show parts where there was no fill at all. (not just GreenFiber but all loose fill). Obviously that's bad because the wall isn't as insulated as it could be. It still saves money on heating/cooling but those unfilled areas often, not always, were trouble spots with rotting wood. The temp difference and seems to cause a moist problem. Read Less
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Asked by
St Petersburg, FL
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
July 25, 2016
Answer: 
Using this material to insulate the exterior walls in a frame house is actually quite easy, even with old plaster walls. Take the time to locate studs and mark all holes to be drilled before beginning your work, and look out for the diagonal corner braces common in early twentieth century houses. If you are currently living in the structure, seal off each room as you work and cover any furniture or rugs Read More
Using this material to insulate the exterior walls in a frame house is actually quite easy, even with old plaster walls. Take the time to locate studs and mark all holes to be drilled before beginning your work, and look out for the diagonal corner braces common in early twentieth century houses. If you are currently living in the structure, seal off each room as you work and cover any furniture or rugs that cannot be removed. If you leave your heating/cooling system on, you might consider changing filters every couple of hours as your work. Use a hole saw to cut your openings for the blower hose and use the cutouts and a bit of joint compound to fill the holes as you finish each room. If a few "plugs" go missing, cut some extras from half-inch Sheetrock.
For reference, with the help of one laborer I recently used cellulose to insulate all exterior walls and the attic of a vacant four-bedroom twenties home in six and one-half days. Finding studs, marking the walls and cutting the holes took three days and prompted me to buy a better stud finder. Blowing in the cellulose, plugging the holes and applying one coat of Sheetrock mud took three LONG days. Acquiring the materials and blower and returning the latter took another half day. Cleanup was accomplished very quickly with the help of an electric leaf blower.
Make use of your respirator, earplugs and knee pads.
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Asked by
Avon Lake, Ohio
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
May 27, 2016
Answer: 
Yes. This is done all the time. We went through the outside rather than the inside. This eliminates all the mess. Home Depot will provide the proper hole size & they also carry plastic plugs to cap the hole when finished. If you have vinyl siding, just undo a panel that will allow access to each wall cavity, drill the proper size hole & fill until the hole overflows and cover with the plastic plug. When Read More
Yes. This is done all the time. We went through the outside rather than the inside. This eliminates all the mess. Home Depot will provide the proper hole size & they also carry plastic plugs to cap the hole when finished. If you have vinyl siding, just undo a panel that will allow access to each wall cavity, drill the proper size hole & fill until the hole overflows and cover with the plastic plug. When the side is done , re-connect your siding & your finished. Our home is noticeably warmer plus outside noise is reduced. Read Less
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Asked by
NYC
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
May 4, 2016
Answer: 
yes you can and it work pretty good. all you have to do is make holes to stick in the hose. if you have old plaster walls it's a bit more complicated than with drywall as you have to break the plaster and wood strips. The easiest thing is to cut out 8"x8" strips in the middle of the wall (floor to celling)That way you can easy maneuver and stick up that 3 or 3.5" hose. Also when cutting through the Read More
yes you can and it work pretty good. all you have to do is make holes to stick in the hose. if you have old plaster walls it's a bit more complicated than with drywall as you have to break the plaster and wood strips. The easiest thing is to cut out 8"x8" strips in the middle of the wall (floor to celling)That way you can easy maneuver and stick up that 3 or 3.5" hose. Also when cutting through the plaster leave those wooden sticks intact, at least the top and bottom one, that way you have something to screw a piece of drywall back after you finish insulating. Stick the hose up to the celling as far as you can while covering the hole with some pillow made out of plastic shopping bags. Once you blow the top part remove the hose and put it facing toward the floor. It's a bit messy as you want a good flow of air in the hose otherwise you end up with stuck cellulose in the hose. Read Less
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Asked by
Mid Michigan
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
October 17, 2015
Answer: 
Yes, but you will need to drill holes to apply it, that will need to be plugged/repaired when finished.There are numerous videos that show a number of ways to accomplish this.
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Asked by
Marietta, GA
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
September 26, 2015
Answer: 
no, you need rolls or bats .... and to install that you must remove the walls to install. Other option is you can drill holes in the wall and apply expanding spray foam into each gap in the wall joists.
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5 answers

r value

This question is from GreenFiber Cellulose Blow-in Insulation
Asked by
buffalo ny
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July 5, 2014
This says it covers 40 square ft, at what r value. What's the r value per inch? Why make this info so hard to find?
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Answers (5)

Asked by
Atlanta, Georgia
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February 16, 2016
Answer: 
"The R-value of loose fill cellulose is R-3.2 to 3.8 per inch. Loose fill fiberglass has an R-value of R-2.2 to 2.7 per inch. Achieving the desired R-value depends on both the depth of the insulation and its density. Insulation depth."
But the thickness will drop a little bit, after the cellulose settlling
http://www.greenfiber.com/step_one_-_calculate_your_need_how_to_install.html
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Asked by
Zillah, Wa
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
August 21, 2014
Answer: 
R-19 is what that is based on according to the information on the installation guide which is downloadable from Home Depot.
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Asked by
Claymont, DE
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
July 23, 2014
Answer: 
I don't know why it's so hard to find (and agree that it is hard to notice it), but the information you want is in the "Info & Guides" box to the right of the "Product Overview" section. "Installation Guide" PDF. It's about R-3 per installed or "unsettled" inch.
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Asked by
Jawja
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July 22, 2014
Answer: 
Also ... click on the Installation Guide for more specific info.
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Asked by
Jawja
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July 22, 2014
Answer: 
R19 is the rating for 40 sqft, with a thickness of about six inches when installed; settling to a final height of about 5.4 inches. R38 will cover about 17.5 sqft, with 11.5/10.5".
Hope this helps.
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4 answers

how many cubic feet in each bag?

This question is from GreenFiber Cellulose Blow-in Insulation
Asked by
corinth,vt
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May 10, 2015
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Answers (4)

Asked by
Colorado
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
September 9, 2015
Answer: 
On second look, the chart I posted the link to was for a 30 lb. bag, whereas HD and Lowes sell 19 lb. bags, so the following chart from HD applies: http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdfImages/14/147163bd-46f1-4833-a0b1-839da92b83f5.pdf. Answer is 16.4 cubic feet
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Asked by
Colorado
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September 8, 2015
Answer: 
Coverage Chart: http://greenfiber.com/images/coveragechart/35201094629AMPM-6.3-33%20Rev%20F%20INS500%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf
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Asked by
bellvue, co
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
September 3, 2015
Answer: 
I calculate 8.3 cubic feet per bag since there is no meaningful answer.
The R value per inch is about 3.4.
There is no such chart on greenfiber that I could find.
Based on the answers - it seems like about 8.3 cubic feet per bag.
658ft*ft * 10/12 in/ft / 650 ft*ft = 8.3 ft*ft*ft
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Asked by
Michigan City, IN
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
August 5, 2015
Answer: 
There is a handy chart at www.greenfiber.com. You just figure out what R-value you want and read the chart.
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Customer Reviews

Rated 4.3 out of 5 by 125 reviewers.
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by WELL WORTH THE TIME NO MATTER WHAT, YOU"RE GONNA MAKE A MESS! DEAL WITH IT!! Saw some great tips that I want to share and came up with a few of my own. 1) Make sure you have a 12 gauge extension cord to plug the machine into 2). Tape a broom handle to the end of the hose to help get those hard to reach areas 3). Wear protective eyewear, hat, long sleeves and pants and a MASK You'll be covered in the stuff, but it's the fiberglass insulation that is the worst!). 4). Make sure you have plenty of light in the attic to see what you are working with (I used two spots and pointed them in different directions before hand to make sure once I got rolling I didn't have to worry about moving lights). 5)Invest in cheap particle board and cut into 2'x8' sections and lay them across the trusses so you can move around easily without stepping through the ceiling! 6). Mark your trusses with the amount of insulation you want to add so you can take the guess work out of it. 7) Work out a communication system between the person feeding the machine and the person in the attic letting you know when to stop and take a break or when you've hit a milestone in the number of bags you've already used. We are already seeing the results of adding insulation to our attic. Well worth the time as the investment should pay for itself within a year! July 3, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Super Easy Installation Me and my buddy decided to insulate both of our houses on a Saturday and we bought three pallets of the Greenfiber (105 bags). This gave us a discount on the bags and a free rental of the insulation blower. Installation was a breeze. The machine worked perfect, we loaded a half bag at a time and broke it up by hand as we fed it. 1 person in the attic installing while the other person fed the machine. Was able to get both of our houses up to a 38 R value and had some insulation left over so we returned it. This is a must do project that is easily done and way cheaper then paying someone to do it. I recommend attaching a broom handle to the end og the hose so you can have a further reach and to wear a full body suit and mask...this stuff is dusty!!! All in all this took us around 6 hours for both houses and we stopped and had a lunch break. Again super easy and I already feel a difference in my house. November 23, 2015
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Dusty work, but it works well My big worry about installing this stuff was all the reviews saying the free rental machine didn't work well. I decided to go for it anyways, and let me tell you: It works VERY well and it pumps the insulation up about as fast as you can control it. It looks like a snowblower coming out. And it never clogged. I did notice that the store had two machines, and one was missing the slider door that regulates the amount of insulation going to the hose. I used the other one. We kept the door 1/3 the way open. The other thing is that the person feeding the machine needs to push the blocks through the grate or not much happens. I used a 10 gauge extension cord on a 20A circuit, and of course, you must run the machine outside. May 3, 2016
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Not inpressed Not to impressed wasn't instructed on how to use the machine and defiantly don't use indoors this stuff blows up your house with dust and insulation and their hose didn't work it plugged up so we had to use our shop vac hose and buy 20 bags to use a useless machine that clogs up and home depo and told them the problem they said bring it back they didn't have another machine to use so I was screwed. Aberdeen washington April 10, 2016
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by No Hoppers!!! Bought 20 bags and then the Weatherford tool department said they had no hopper! We had to spend time and gas going to Ft Worth to get one. Wasted valuable time and had to pay $80+ for extra 4 hrs of use! Product was good but service was NOT!!! April 26, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by DIY and save money This is the best DIY project we ever did. Spent 5 times less than the contractor quoted price by blowing the insulation by two of us in 3 hours. House is very quiet and warm right after the insulation. We followed some of the tips posted by others. Sealing the hose connections using duct tape, attaching a piece of wood/pipe towards the end of the hose, covering the attic opening as well as the door near the machine, etc. We had dust only in the attic during blowing meanwhile the house was spotless. If possible, rent the new taller and lighter machine instead of the square one. It was just blasting off the cellulose at a greater speed. Also cut all the bags open and split into half before you start. October 13, 2014
Rated 2.0 out of 5.0 by Call Me Dusty I purchased a bag of this product to fill in a low spot in the attic around a newly installed bathroom fan. I was careful to close off the fan vent during "installation" of this product (rubbing two big chunks of it together until the void was filled). But it didn't matter - this insulation is so "dusty" that it worked its way into the tiny openings in the fan enclosure. You should have seen it coming out of the bathroom fan vent when I turned it on; it looked like an old fashioned train with smoke coming out of the chimney! I suppose it will eventually "calm down." I'm glad I got to try out a single bag because I'm planning on adding additional insulation to my attic in the future. While I like the idea of using recycled materials, I won't be buying any more of this product. It's just too dusty. I'll stick with the fiberglass type. March 9, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by A dusty but easy way to save a lot of money. Bought 10 bales, 4 for me, 6 for my son's house. Needed a little touch up coverage in both houses. Didn't get the blower machine as we were going to be a couple of days getting around to blowing it all in. Instead, I made a blower from a leaf vacuum and it worked perfectly. I would not go this route for a whole attic installation but for a room or two, it worked fine. DON'T FORGET THE MASK AND GOOGLES AND EARPLUG PACKAGE. July 20, 2013
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