Model # 220023

Internet #100170507

Store SKU #202225

James Hardie HardieBacker 3 ft. x 5 ft. x 0.42 in. Cement Backerboard
0727396200233

James Hardie

HardieBacker 3 ft. x 5 ft. x 0.42 in. Cement Backerboard

  • Lightweight structure that offers strong bonding properties
  • Ready for wallpapering, tiling, painting, or texturing
  • Protects your underlayment against moisture and mold
$12.97 / each
If you buy 30 or more
$11.67 / each

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Product Overview

HardieBacker cement board is a tile underlayment made for wet areas like kitchens and bathrooms. This cement-based backer board, made of 90% Portland cement and sand, resists damage from moisture and mold and provides excellent tile adhesion. Its formulation and structure results in the ideal combination of strength, uniform composition and performance that no other backer board can provide. HardieBacker cement board was made to be easier to work with so that regardless of how you cut your board, the result is less debris. HardieBacker cement board's superior strength and durability delivers a solid foundation for tile jobs to help protect your work and reputation. James Hardie stands behind HardieBacker cement board with a limited lifetime product warranty.

California residents: see   Proposition 65 information

  • The Most Preferred Brand of Backer Board by Tile Installers and Contractors
  • HardieBacker 500 cement board (0.42 in. thick) is best used for walls, ceilings and floors
  • Made better - The 90% Portland cement and sand formulation provides a solid foundation for your tile with up to 3 times the compressive strength of competitive board
  • Installs better - cuts cleaner for tighter seam lines and less debris
  • Performs better - unique formulation delivers a product with outstanding resistance to moisture and mold
  • Score and snap the board by making 2-3 passes with a utility knife or a carbide tipped blade, place one hand and knee firmly along the score line, then use the opposite hand to pull the board up
  • Cut HardieBacker cement board with snapper shears instead of a grinder for the same clean, sharp edges for straight seam lines while significantly reducing the amount of dust in your work environment
  • Limited lifetime product warranty
  • Non-combustible

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Customer Questions & Answers

55 Questions96 Answers

Customer Questions & Answers

HardieBacker 3 ft. x 5 ft. x 0.42 in. Cement Backerboard
HardieBacker 3 ft. x 5 ft. x 0.42 in. Cement Backerboard

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4 answers

I need to cut out for a niche in the shower...

This question is from HardieBacker 3 ft. x 5 ft. x 0.42 in. Cement Backerboard
Asked by
Baltimore
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August 11, 2016
I am not aware of any way to score and break. Is there a way to hand-cut or an approved power tool?
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August 15, 2016
Answer: 
A carbide tipped blade on a jig saw generally works the best with the least amount of dust. You should cut the product outside with the proper protection is you are using a power tool.
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Asked by
So. California
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
August 13, 2016
Answer: 
I had no luck with score-and-break, ended up using a saber saw with a diamond blade and cutting very slowly.
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Asked by
Palm Desert, CA
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
August 12, 2016
Answer: 
Home Depot sells Circular Saw Blades designed for this purpose. They fit any typical 7 1/4" circular saw and attach just like any other saw blade.
Here are a couple of the products they carry:
Diablo Model # D0704DH Internet # 100627137 Store SKU # 619584
7-1/4 in. x 4-Tooth Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Tipped James Hardie/Fiber Cement Saw Blade
Avanti Pro Model # P0706CHR Internet # Read More
Home Depot sells Circular Saw Blades designed for this purpose. They fit any typical 7 1/4" circular saw and attach just like any other saw blade.
Here are a couple of the products they carry:
Diablo Model # D0704DH Internet # 100627137 Store SKU # 619584
7-1/4 in. x 4-Tooth Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Tipped James Hardie/Fiber Cement Saw Blade
Avanti Pro Model # P0706CHR Internet # 203914961 Store SKU # 1000002421
7-1/4 in. x 6-Tooth Fiber Cement Cutting Saw Blade
There are a couple of things to be aware of when using a blade like this. First and foremost, a TON of dust will be created, and I mean a lot. You MUST wear an appropriate dust mask and eye protection, NO Exceptions. I would highly recommend you do not do any cutting inside of your home as it will be covered in a layer of thick dust. Even when cutting outside, I would be aware of vehicles near by, open windows etc. Cutting this way produces a lot of dust!
Another option is using a diamond blade on a grinder, although the dust creation is about the same.
For small sections, you could use a jig saw / saber saw with a carbide blade. Home Depot sells and stocks many options for these blades. You can typically find one in the Tile Section with the other tile tools, as well in the main Tool Section of the store with the other blades. This does not produce as much dust, but does produce some.
Just a few options that I personally use on a regular basis, I hope they help you out as well.
Cheers! Read Less
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Asked by
Pittsburgh, PA
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
August 12, 2016
Answer: 
There are a number of techniques you can use. Very theoretically, you can score and use a hammer to knock out the niche, but I wouldn't recommend it. You could use an oscillating tool with a carbide or diamond-grit flat blade to make deep scores and then knock it out. There are diamond jigsaw blades that can do the job. But what I would do is get myself an N95 or P95 dust mask/particulate respirator, an Read More
There are a number of techniques you can use. Very theoretically, you can score and use a hammer to knock out the niche, but I wouldn't recommend it. You could use an oscillating tool with a carbide or diamond-grit flat blade to make deep scores and then knock it out. There are diamond jigsaw blades that can do the job. But what I would do is get myself an N95 or P95 dust mask/particulate respirator, an inexpensive angle grinder, and a diamond turbo blade for it. That's how i handle at least 90% of my plunge cuts into 0.42 Hardiebacker, especially for niches. The dust mask is not optional.
You'll need help cleaning up the cuts in the corners. A surprisingly effective solution is using a bare carbide hacksaw blade. Since they usually don't fit into close-quarter hacksaw frames, wrap some duct tape around half of it for a handle and use the other half to make a precision corner cut. Read Less
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3 answers

What is the actual size of a 3x5 board?

This question is from HardieBacker 3 ft. x 5 ft. x 0.42 in. Cement Backerboard
Asked by
Rhode Island
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September 19, 2016
Are the actual dimensions 36" x 60"? If yes, why are the material dimensions not compatible with standard framing (16" O.C.. 24" O.C., etc...)? This translates to a lot of waste in a job.
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October 6, 2016
Answer: 
It is 3x5 and it is based on standard bath tub sizes.
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Asked by
So. California
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September 19, 2016
Answer: 
The actual dimensions are as stated. As to why they are not compatible with standard stud spacing, you might address that question to the manufacturer, but my guess would be that it's due to the weight. These boards are very heavy! A 4 x 8 sheet would be nearly impossible for one person to heft into place on a job, and, if not supported carefully, might crack in half under its own weight during Read More
The actual dimensions are as stated. As to why they are not compatible with standard stud spacing, you might address that question to the manufacturer, but my guess would be that it's due to the weight. These boards are very heavy! A 4 x 8 sheet would be nearly impossible for one person to heft into place on a job, and, if not supported carefully, might crack in half under its own weight during transport. 60 inches works out OK hung horizontally over a bathtub, though, which is where I used it. Read Less
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September 19, 2016
Answer: 
The board is 3'x5'.
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3 answers

Would this be good under a portable fire pit to protect our lawn?

This question is from HardieBacker 3 ft. x 5 ft. x 0.42 in. Cement Backerboard
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June 26, 2016
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Asked by
Washington State
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
October 11, 2016
Answer: 
Hardiebacker board will not catch on fire itself, but it will transmit heat to whatever it sits on, so no, don't use it to protect your lawn. It will likely kill the grass in the area it covers because it's cement, allowing no air to the grass, and if it doesn't completely kill it that way, it will allow the heat from the fire pit to overheat the grass and kill it that way. I suggest you use bricks or Read More
Hardiebacker board will not catch on fire itself, but it will transmit heat to whatever it sits on, so no, don't use it to protect your lawn. It will likely kill the grass in the area it covers because it's cement, allowing no air to the grass, and if it doesn't completely kill it that way, it will allow the heat from the fire pit to overheat the grass and kill it that way. I suggest you use bricks or pavers, but neither of them will help the grass live. Read Less
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June 28, 2016
Answer: 
No, our product transfers heat too fast.
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Asked by
So. California
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June 27, 2016
Answer: 
I think it would protect the lawn OK. The only issue I can think of would be the strength, if someone walked on it. It's quite brittle and could crack if not uniformly supported from underneath, for example if the ground were very soft or uneven.
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3 answers

Why is this only .42" thick?

This question is from HardieBacker 3 ft. x 5 ft. x 0.42 in. Cement Backerboard
Asked by
Hillsborough,nj
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June 22, 2016
I'd like to use this Hardibacker behind the tiles around my tub. I removed the bottom row of tiles and cement board that was 1/2" thick. Why is Hardibacker only .42" thick, when most Sheetrock, green-board + cement boards are a full 1/2"? Do I use two 1/4" pcs. (to get back to a 1/2" base) or what else can I do to make up for the roughly 3/32 less difference in thickness, so the newly set tiles will be level with existing tiles?
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Asked by
Palm Desert, CA
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June 24, 2016
Answer: 
The tapered edge of drywall is .42" thick as well. Plus, it is much easier to add .08" of extra Thinset when installing tile, rather than having to remove some material from the HardiBacker (in the event a tapered edge butts up to it).
It really is helpful having it slightly thinner for a couple of other reasons as well.
Cheers!
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June 24, 2016
Answer: 
We try to match the taper edge of drywall. You can use bigger notch trowel to install the tile or fur out the board.
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Asked by
Pittsburgh, PA
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June 23, 2016
Answer: 
The quick answer to your question of how to make the newly set bottom row of tiles level with the rest of your tiles is to use slightly more mortar. Because it's the bottom row, you can get away with it.
HardieBacker is .42 inches thick as an aid to continuing a continuous line of tile across wet and dry areas. In dry areas, you would use tile mastic to stick your tiles to the wall, whereas in wet Read More
The quick answer to your question of how to make the newly set bottom row of tiles level with the rest of your tiles is to use slightly more mortar. Because it's the bottom row, you can get away with it.
HardieBacker is .42 inches thick as an aid to continuing a continuous line of tile across wet and dry areas. In dry areas, you would use tile mastic to stick your tiles to the wall, whereas in wet areas, you would use mortar. I know lots of professionals today use tile mastic even on shower walls, but I have yet to be converted and probably never will be.
You always need less mastic to get the same tiles stuck to a wall than you need mortar. Half-inch drywall is usually what you ned in most residential bathrooms. The gap between the 0.42-in thickness of the HardieBacker and 0.5-inch drywall allows you to add that mortar and yet continue in a straight line across the wall.
This need becomes most obvious when you're doing a bathroom in polished granite or marble. Please look at the picture. The tiles in the tub surround are adhered with Custom's natural stone mortar, while the tiles outside the shower are adhered with Custom's Acrylpro As you can see, there is no observable deviation in the level of the tile running across the outside wall crossed into the tub surround, where the 0.42-in HardieBacker meets 0.5-in barneyboard (purple drywall). Read Less
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Customer Reviews

Rated 4.1 out of 5 by 39 reviewers.
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by great product and price perfect for waterproofing i am using it in a civil p;roject behind tiles in a tunnel in NYC October 25, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Google is my BFF So I ripped out the old tile in my bathroom...which the previous contractor (who messed up my tile btw) used Durarock cement boards to only find myself cleaning up a crumbled mess. I read review after review and heard from several contractors to use Hardie board for this project and i'm glad that i did. Now im a diy'er...so my first thought was how in the bleep are we going to cut through this stuff. Well..Thats why there's that good ole trial and error...(we first used a circular saw to no avail) but once I googled and found a demonstrarion on how to cut it...it was smooth sailing after that. Now if little old me could use a blade to penentrate this board and then kick to snap and get a clean break...anyone can (I wouldnt recommend this method and i only did that once. The real person doing the work just scoured and snapped it. I also used the same waterproofing method as everyone else on the seams. Although frustration started off pretty high with the board... once we googled it and watched the video...it was a breeze to work with. Would definitely use for future tiling projects. January 19, 2016
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Worked good for me I found this product easy to work with for what I was doing. It was easy to cut with a grinder with a diamond blade. Pretty dusty though. You might have to pick through the pile to find one without a bent corner is the only real problem. May 29, 2016
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by worst product ever Needed 3 sheets (3x5) to extend the area of a retiling job that used durock 30+ yrs ago. HD was out of 1/2" durock so I bought this. Scoring it is a waste of time. It will NOT break cleanly at the score whether it's a short or small piece or a long cut such as cutting a sheet in half. It took a lot of effort to get it to break even with a VERY deep score (over 1/8") and then it did NOT follow the score line. The factory edges were curled up on the sheets and I had to stand on them to get them to lay flat as I screwed them down. Very wavy material. The special screws then pulled the board away from the floor as they went in and I had to back them out, stand on the board again and reset the screws. It's taken almost an hour per board to install. The screws sometimes don't sink cleanly into the board and leave a puffy raised area of residue around them. I've had to scrape the board to level these off and vacuum so I don't end up with this stuff dragging through the thinset. I can't imagine doing a large job with this stuff. I cannot think of a single advantage to using this junk. You've been warned. May 16, 2015
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by 71yr old Woman Scores With Hardiebacker This is a triple-first for me: first time using Hardiebacker myself; first time using my circular saw; and first time scoring and snapping cement board. The .5" 3'x5' sheets weigh 47# so a friend laid them out on the porch for me where I could clamp a sheet to the adjacent top step and use the porch floor for a workbench while standing where I wouldn't need to bend over. I stood below on a cement platform and the porch deck was the perfect height for the project. I had taped together from cardboard a pattern for the hearth I would tile, cutting out the section for the chimney stack. I laid the pattern on the first sheet of Hardiebacker, drew around it with a pencil and made the first cut. It was easy. I turned the sheet a quarter turn by sliding it, using my Doc Marten clad feet because my arms gave out and I felt a pinch in my back when I tried turning it by hand. I reclamped the piece and made the second cut, stopping when the new cut line met the perpendicular line of the first cut. The cutout corner came off with just a little pressure, nice and clean - except for a 5/8" bit on the reverse side on both sides of the corner. That came off with several slices from my utility knife. That cut was all that was needed for the first sheet, but I had a dilemma - the first sheet needed to be moved indoors next to the hearth spot, and I couldn't carry or slide it. I couldn't lift it up to slide it on a side or end either. I decided to cut it in half, but didn't want to stir up a cloud of silica dust, so I decided to use my heavy duty utility knife to score it. As a visual artist and custom framer I am familiar with scoring glass and thin plexi and then snapping it over a pencil or table edge. A video demonstrated a similar procedure with Hardiebacker so that's what I did. I used a T-square to ensure a good solid straight cut, clamping it on that same step I had used to clamp the Hardiebacker. I made at least 5 passes with the blade and it was ready to snap. Again I was faced with a problem of how to leverage the board up on its side so I could break it against my knee. The way I solved the problem was to pull the board until half of it (at the scored line) was over thin air, aligning the line with the edge of the porch (no handrails to get in the way). Then I snapped it down and it divided cleanly in two pieces, just as I had hoped it would. A 24# half-board was light enough to lift and carry inside, but when my back winged again I just stood it up the long way so I didn't need to bend over so far to hold it, and I walked it back-and-forth on end the 15' into position next to the hearth bed. Ditto for the second half-piece. That left one more 5'x3' sheet to cut from the other half of the pattern. It's a sure thing that if a novice like me can manipulate this cement board a regular handygal or handyman can do likewise. The photos show the small cut (about 6"x9" - remember I worked from a pattern, not from measurements) done with the circular saw, and the clean horizontal lines of the half-boards resulting from scoring and snapping them. July 28, 2015
Rated 3.0 out of 5.0 by Good one the wall - a real pain to cut - score and snap is a myth I think my next purchase will be wonderboard or some other cement product. Hardieboard is nice and smooth and it doesn't have the fiber mesh that other products do. I'm not a pro, but I think this is probably a better product to have on the wall. That said, cutting this stuff is a massive pain. The score and snap method worked for me a couple times after I scored halfway through the board. Other times it failed and it snapped in the wrong place. If you are a DIYer, I would suggest not even trying this method on the thicker board. It is not nearly as easy as they show you on the video. I was able to take it outside and cut it nicely with a hand saw, tossing some water on it as i cut so the dust is low. Another success I had cutting is using a cheap wet saw. It cuts nice and clean and straight with no dust. The downside with these methods is that they take forever. This stuff looks nice on the walls, it is strong and not crumbly. However, the pains I had to go through to cut this stuff made it a bad experience. April 21, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Doing it's job Our tile guy recommended we get this product for the shower. He installed it with ease and since it is less than a month ago it was installed only time will tell if it continues to hold up. September 6, 2014
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Awesome Product - easy to use, heavy and sturdy I used this material for a roof on top of my pergola. I know it is not to be used for outdoor applications (as per its warranty) however I did my research and have seen much success with it here in Florida's weather. I painted the interior side with exterior concrete paint 1 part expoxy (the ceiling) and the exposed side (roof) with a siliconized roof paint. Lanco 1-Gallon Ultra Siliconizer Roof Sealer - I sealed the joints with roofing tape. A waterproof seal and a nice finished look. September 15, 2013
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