Model # GLO45

Internet #100203798

Store SKU #126721

Klean-Strip 1 gal. Boiled Linseed Oil
0030192045251

Klean-Strip

1 gal. Boiled Linseed Oil

$23.96 /each

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Product Overview

The Klean-Strip 1 gal. Boiled Linseed Oil is both a thinner for oil-based paints and a coating. As a thinner, it improves the flow and gloss of oil-based paints. As a coating, it creates a beautiful hand-rubbed finish on fine wood and antiques. It increases wood's resistance to watermarks, scratches and warping.

  • Formula designed to dry faster than raw linseed oil
  • Low-VOC formula
  • Applies with brush or cloth
  • Helps keep wood looking beautiful/

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Customer Questions & Answers

1 gal. Boiled Linseed Oil
1 gal. Boiled Linseed Oil

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Is boiled linseed oil product #GLO45 photochemically reactive?

This question is from 1 gal. Boiled Linseed Oil
Asked by
Springfield, Oregon
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September 4, 2014
I make my own violin varnish which needs to be photochemically reactive and cannot use synthetic components.
Thank you!
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Asked by
Luttrell, Tennessee
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
November 13, 2015
Answer: 
This linseed oil does not require light, I suspect from your question that you're using UV or sunlight to cure your varnish. I've made small quantities of violin varnish using food quality flax seed oil. It is linseed oil by a different name but it's not been processed with heat or chemicals. It's easily found at health food stores. I've also made varnish using walnut oil, again sold for consumption, and Read More
This linseed oil does not require light, I suspect from your question that you're using UV or sunlight to cure your varnish. I've made small quantities of violin varnish using food quality flax seed oil. It is linseed oil by a different name but it's not been processed with heat or chemicals. It's easily found at health food stores. I've also made varnish using walnut oil, again sold for consumption, and I believe it looks better. Both flax seed and walnut oil will dry better using UV treatment or exposure to the sun. Otherwise you'll need either Japan dryer or the patience of Job. Read Less
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September 5, 2014
Answer: 
No, Klean Strip Boiled Linseed Oil is not photochemically reactive.
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This question is from 1 gal. Boiled Linseed Oil
 
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can linseed oil be put over stained exterior siding?

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great falls mt.
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May 4, 2014
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February 29, 2016
Answer: 
I have used boiled linseed oil cut with terpentine with great results. First coat, 3 units terpentine to one unit linseed oil. Second coat is one unit each, third coat is 3 units boiled linseed oil to one part terpentine. The terpentine help pull the oil into the wood. Each coat needs to dry before the next coat. The last coat may take a day to dry. We used todo on a redwood canon deck in the early 70's Read More
I have used boiled linseed oil cut with terpentine with great results. First coat, 3 units terpentine to one unit linseed oil. Second coat is one unit each, third coat is 3 units boiled linseed oil to one part terpentine. The terpentine help pull the oil into the wood. Each coat needs to dry before the next coat. The last coat may take a day to dry. We used todo on a redwood canon deck in the early 70's and it is still holding strong. Read Less
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May 5, 2014
Answer: 
No, I'm afraid not. Linseed Oil can only be applied to a bare surface, else it won't penetrate and dry properly.
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Is it suitable for treating a wooden cutting board? ie food contact

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October 23, 2016
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October 24, 2016
Answer: 
No, do not use the BOILED Linseed, use RAW Linseed instead.
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How much does this slow the drying time of oil paint? If I am using a paint that takes 24 hrs to dry, for example?

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September 22, 2016
And what is the ratio to add?
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September 22, 2016
Answer: 
It does not slow the drying time at all. The mixing ratio is up to you.
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Customer Reviews

1 gal. Boiled Linseed Oil is rated 5.0 out of 5 by 4.
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Good for the house We use linseed oil mixed half and half with paint thinner to spray onto our wood siding. Keeps the wood siding looking nice and repels the bugs...including carpenter bees.
Date published: 2016-08-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing! After much research on natural look wood finishes that were non toxic I went with Linseed oil for my beehives. I had ordered 24 boxes that all needed to be coated, using an old rag, I applied as directed, and the result was a stunning finish, the linseed oil brought out the natural grain and beauty of the wood.
Date published: 2013-03-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great sealer for cedar fence I used this on a new cedar fence. I didn't thin the linseed oil and found it worked better to brush it on rather than use a sprayer. I started with a sprayer. It didn't take much longer to use a brush and brushing it on gave me a littler better coverage.
Date published: 2014-06-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Used on a wood deck car trailer Put two coats of linseed oil over a new pressure treated pine decked car trailer. Really made the wood look good and I hope it will retain its color longer. Use a chunky waterproofing brush. I poured a bit in a plastic paint cup and drizzled it on. Don't pour too much on at a time as you want it to work into the wood and not create a sticky residue.
Date published: 2014-08-25
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