0081483009032

Lifetime

Model # 60053

Internet # 202963931

4 ft. x 4 ft. Two Raised Garden Beds with One Tent Enclosure

$120.50 /each

FREQUENTLY BOUGHT TOGETHER

PRODUCT OVERVIEW

Model # 60053

Internet # 202963931

The 4 ft. x 4 ft. Lifetime raised garden bed features 9 in. High walls, inter-locking assembly, and one early start enclosure (clear vinyl). This model is 8 pieces, making (2) 4 ft. x 4 ft. Boxes and comes in brown. Includes a 5-year warranty on the garden beds and 2-year warranty on the enclosure. Three equal parts: vermiculite, peat moss and compost (16 cu. ft. of mix total). See included how-to garden guide for tips on plant spacing. Recommendations of what you might need (not included). Soil Mix - Three equal parts: vermiculite, peat moss and compost (16 cubic feet of mix total). Weed barrier - enough to cover the underside of your box (4 ft. x 4 ft.). Seeds or starts.

  • Easy do-it-yourself assembly no tools required
  • Full garden set-up in less than 1 hour
  • Easy inter-locking assembly
  • Stackable design creates 18 in. high walls
  • Low-maintenance, simulated wood design emits no toxicity
  • Constructed of UV-protected High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) will not rot, crack, or peel
  • Absorbs and retains the needed warmth for root development
  • Includes an early start enclosure
  • How-to garden guide included

Info & Guides

You will need Adobe® Acrobat® Reader to view PDF documents.  Download a free copy from the Adobe Web site.

SPECIFICATIONS

Dimensions
Container Height (in.) 
Container Length (in.) 
48.75 
Container Width (in.) 
48.75 
Details
Color Family 
Brown 
Color/Finish 
Brown 
Material 
Plastic 
Number of Tiers 
Product Weight (lb.) 
26 lb 
Raised Bed Features 
Elevated Bed,Greenhouse 
Returnable 
90-Day 
Shape 
Square 

MORE PRODUCTS WITH THESE FEATURES

Material: Plastic
Shape: Square
Container Length (in.): 45 - 50
Container Width (in.): 45 - 50
Price: $100 - $150
Review Rating: 4 & Up
Brand: Lifetime
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18 Questions48 Answers

Customer Questions & Answers

4 ft. x 4 ft. Two Raised Garden Beds with One Tent Enclosure
4 ft. x 4 ft. Two Raised Garden Beds with One Tent Enclosure

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5 answers

putting on a deck

This question is from 4 ft. x 4 ft. Two Raised Garden Beds with One Tent Enclosure
Asked by
Lisa
Illinois
May 6, 2013
I'd like to put this on a deck but noticed that it does not come with a bottom. Is there something I can do so that I would be able to use this on my balcony deck?
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Asked by
Read all my Q&A
May 12, 2015
Answer: 
Like you said it is bottomless and intended to drain so I'm not sure a desk is the best place for it. If you lined it with plastic it might not drain properly. If you did manage to install it successfully you should think about the cleanup later if you want to remove it. You will have a large amount of dirt to move by hand of your deck. You might be better off using pots.
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Asked by
McKinney, TX
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
September 8, 2014
Answer: 
no, I don't think it would work well on a wood deck as it does not have a bottom. Anything you put under it would probably saturate the deck and lead to wood rot. I would suggest something raised so the water can drain off and not be held against the deck.
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Asked by
Waterloo, Iowa
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
April 7, 2014
Answer: 
I would suggest making it like a big planter by starting with stacking two boxes and lining them with two layers of very heavy black plastic, Put 4 inches of rock in the bottom for drainage and then put in your planting medium.
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May 6, 2013
Answer: 
You could just place the garden bed right on the deck. You wouldn't want to put in a solid bottom because that won't allow for the necessary water drainage. However, you should be aware that the minerals in the soil will eventually stain the deck.
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May 6, 2013
Answer: 
Hi Lisa, I never thought of placing a raised bed on a balcony before. Raised beds come without bottoms to allow for drainage and blocking that it's ability to do so can present problems like root rot from holding excessive moisture.
If you decide to place this on a deck one possible way to go about it would be to line the inside with at least two layers of medium density landscape fabric. This will Read More
Hi Lisa, I never thought of placing a raised bed on a balcony before. Raised beds come without bottoms to allow for drainage and blocking that it's ability to do so can present problems like root rot from holding excessive moisture.
If you decide to place this on a deck one possible way to go about it would be to line the inside with at least two layers of medium density landscape fabric. This will prevent the soil from escaping and still allow for drainage. The downside would be the water drainage from the bed would soil stain whatever is below it. Now if you are in a home and there is raw earth underneath the deck this isn't a huge problem. If this is a apartment balcony with neighbors below it is a HUGE problem.
So while this can be done it's a project that will require some foresight. I hope this helps.
Cheers,
Chris
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5 answers

Can I stack the 2 beds on top of each other for a deeper root system?

This question is from 4 ft. x 4 ft. Two Raised Garden Beds with One Tent Enclosure
Asked by
niki
the woodlands, tx
April 21, 2013
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Asked by
Read all my Q&A
May 12, 2015
Answer: 
Yes you can stack the 2 beds vertically to create a deeper bed but for most vegetables one is deep enough at 9". Things like potatoes and carrots might benefit from deeper roots. Or place them on top of soil that you have already loosened and it will allow the roots to seek deeper into the ground, below the bottom of the bed.
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Asked by
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February 17, 2015
Answer: 
Yes. I did for that reason.
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Asked by
McKinney, TX
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
September 8, 2014
Answer: 
yes, you can stack these double deep which works really well for plants with long tap roots (carrots, parsnips, etc.) You cannot stack three deep.
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April 21, 2013
Answer: 
Yes, this kit is designed to offer two 9" deep beds or by stacking, one 18" bed which is great for growing deep-root vegetables like potatoes.
User submitted photo
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Asked by
Zone 7-8
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April 21, 2013
Answer: 
Yes, that's what I'm doing, and it works beautifully.
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5 answers

how many tomato plants can I plant in one 4 x 4 container?

This question is from 4 ft. x 4 ft. Two Raised Garden Beds with One Tent Enclosure
Asked by
tomato-lover
kansas city
March 31, 2013
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Asked by
rockford, il
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May 3, 2016
Answer: 
I wouldn't put tomatoes in this box....save it for smaller goodies.....16 carrots in 1 sq. ft., or 9 beets. or 4 leaf lettuce. (Check internet for info.) I put short non-flowering veggies together under loose insect netting (easiest method). Or cross 2 10' plastic 1/2" pipes with ends stuck in opposite corners for taller plants. Tie together at top & cover with netting. I use cheap tulle netting with Read More
I wouldn't put tomatoes in this box....save it for smaller goodies.....16 carrots in 1 sq. ft., or 9 beets. or 4 leaf lettuce. (Check internet for info.) I put short non-flowering veggies together under loose insect netting (easiest method). Or cross 2 10' plastic 1/2" pipes with ends stuck in opposite corners for taller plants. Tie together at top & cover with netting. I use cheap tulle netting with clothespins.
Add a trellis & grow vertical: cukes, pole beans, snap peas. (No netting here)
Keep tomatoes in the ground (or large pots if necessary). Easier to stake.
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Asked by
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May 12, 2015
Answer: 
It depends on how seriously you take the tomato plant spacing instructions, but knowing how big tomato plants can grow I would say about 5 plants. One in each corner and one in the middle. That would give them room to grow. You could probably cram 9 plants in there though.
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Asked by
McKinney, TX
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
September 8, 2014
Answer: 
I personally plant five - one in each corner and one in the center. You could plant more but it is important to not crowd the leaves of a tomato plant. They need good air circulation or you can end up with powdery mildew or rust pretty quick. I underplant the tomatoes with other veggies like radishes, parsley, and onions and swiss chard.
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Asked by
Read all my Q&A
May 29, 2013
Answer: 
Four with cages worked well
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Asked by
Zone 7-8
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April 1, 2013
Answer: 
I would say approximately eight: three on two sides of the planter, and two in the center alternating between the ones on the sides.
At the moment, in our emerging Zone 7 springtime, I have turnip greens, three peppers, four rocket lettuce, mint and basil.
I love my planter; it has given me lovely greens throughout our sometimes-below-zero wintertime!
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5 answers

what are the depth requirements for various vegetables? Not sure if I need to stack or not?

This question is from 4 ft. x 4 ft. Two Raised Garden Beds with One Tent Enclosure
Asked by
tracy1nole
February 24, 2013
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Answers (5)

Asked by
rockford, il
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May 3, 2016
Answer: 
Put your 4 x 4 box on the ground, not a deck. Roots can go deep. No need to stack. Have 2 gardens & double the food!
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Asked by
Read all my Q&A
May 12, 2015
Answer: 
Most common garden vegetables are OK with the 9" depth of this bed, but potatoes and carrots could benefit from double stacking or placing the bed over loosened soil to allow them to develop deeper roots. I planted miniature carrots that didn't require as much depth.
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Asked by
McKinney, TX
Read all my Q&A
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
September 8, 2014
Answer: 
Most vegetables do fine with a single depth. You need deeper beds for things with long tap roots or long root vggies (like carrots and parsnips.) Do a search for square gardening for other suggestions Home Depot has a good book by Mel Bartholomew - the father of square foot gardening. It tells you how many plants to plant per square foot and the depth requirements as well as much more.
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April 21, 2013
Answer: 
Yes these beds stack which create an 18" deep bed. Quick research of the vegetables you plan to grow will show if this is adequate for your particular application. I've grown potatoes in mine with no issues.
User submitted photo
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February 25, 2013
Answer: 
The only vegetable that would require stacking the garden beds is the potato. Carrots and parsnips will grow longer if they are planted in a stacked bed, but they will do well in just a single bed, too.
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CUSTOMER REVIEWS

Rated 4.8 out of 5 by 45 reviewers.
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by best square foot garden box available Had 3 of these at my old home. No deterioration in 3-4 years. Color still strong (dark grey). Construction solid. Use a lightweight medium to fill-if you use garden dirt sides may bulge a bit. You want a loose medium anyway for increased production. A very attractive box, even in it's "old" age! Just purchased two more for new home. May 3, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Excellent product The raised garden beds are really great, easy to put together and weather resistant. March 26, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Great gift I purchased this raised bed garden for my husband. He was excited to put it to good use. March 22, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Good way to Start Gardening I'm glad I chose this instead of trying to build a raised bed because it was very fast and easy to set up and the canopy allowed me to start some of the plants earlier in the spring when it was still frosty. I little warning though: even though it's an easy setup, read the instructions for installing the corner brackets and hardware BEFORE FILLING WITH DIRT otherwise you will be digging the dirt out later to install the hardware which is necessary for using the canopy. May 12, 2015
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Easy set up, attractive look Product was very easy to click together. I did not stack mine & I did not use the starter tent yet. Set up was about 10 minutes, not including positioning in the yard with weed barrier fabric. Neutral color looks good in our empty yard. The embossed wainscott pattern on the sides is nice looking. I rated slightly lower for value because I think they were alittle overpriced compared to making your own cedar beds. I used more than 8 cu feet of soil per bed....more 9 each. May 22, 2012
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Overall, a great product Easy to assemble. Great quality. Would prefer if it were made with interior dimension of 48"x48" for true Square Foot Gardening. Bed is actually about 45"x45". Should last many years. Have not used the Tent Enclosure yet. June 9, 2014
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Excellent at the Price! I looked at many raised beds hoping to replace my rotting wood beds with something composite or plastic. The beds interlock at the corners in seconds, are very sturdy, great to look at and not too cumbersome to be moved around by one person during setup. I am very pleased with this purchase because the price was much less than most I researched and the "early start enclosure" was a great bonus feature. I hope to purchase more when I am ready to expand my garden. April 24, 2012
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Great value! For a backyard gardener they are a great option. They take only minutes to assemble and the topper is more sturdy than I imagined. I set them up in Fall because it is easy to take up sod at that time. Can't wait till spring to start growing things. October 27, 2015
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