Model # RL1147S

Internet #205176548

Ralph Lauren 1-gal. Chalk Stripe Semi-Gloss Interior Paint
0022367083359

Ralph Lauren

1-gal. Chalk Stripe Semi-Gloss Interior Paint

$40.96 /each

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Product Overview

Ralph Lauren Paint represents a tradition of enduring quality. Using the finest materials and some of the most innovative technology in the industry, Ralph Lauren Paint is engineered to perform best in class, from the can to the wall. The paint applies beautifully for a smooth, even finish.

California residents: see   Proposition 65 information

  • Superior color accuracy and retention
  • Paint + Primer formula provides for ease of application
  • Impeccable coverage - even the darkest colors in just 2 coats
  • Maintains a freshly painted appearance
  • 100% acrylic latex formula provides excellent durability and resistance
  • Lifetime warranty
  • Made in USA
  • Available in 400 uniquely beautiful colors
  • Online Price includes Paint Care fee in the following states: CA, CO, CT, ME, MN, OR, RI, VT

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Customer Questions & Answers

1-gal. Chalk Stripe Semi-Gloss Interior Paint
1-gal. Chalk Stripe Semi-Gloss Interior Paint

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1 answer

How can I avoid using latex paint (having an allergy to latex) for a project?

This question is from 1-gal. Chalk Stripe Eggshell Interior Paint
Asked by
FL
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December 27, 2015
What kind of alternative paint might I use for the same result, or does the latex affect something to do with the bond or texture of the paint? I will be using a bag of your plaster-of-paris powder, if it is a recipe for paint comparable to antiquing chalk paint. Can you tell if it is, or if is the kind of paint you use as a chalkboard that may be written on?

I found a recipe for chalk paint, (I assume this is the type for antique finish, such as "Annie Sloan" chalk paint - as opposed to the other "chalk" paint). I am refinishing several pieces of furniture, and would like to know if I can substitute the latex paint in the recipe for any other kind, as I have developed an allergy to latex? If not, do you know of any precautions that I may use, and whether it would be a bad idea to touch it once dry? I know I must have been in many places with latex painted walls, and have never had a reaction, (I get hives where I have touched it when I come into direct contact with it - but cannot recall ever having this with paint).
I am asking purely for informational purposes for contemplation. I do understand this is not medical advice and I am not soliciting that from you. I'd just like to know of any precautions you might already be aware of, and whether you know of whether dry paint is known to evoke a reaction in people allergic to the ingredient? I also understand you are not to be liable for any resulting factor or influence of whether I use the paint or other latex product(s) such as rollers as my use of them would not be in any way a result of yours or affiliated entities on answering this question,
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Answer (1)

December 28, 2015
Answer: 
Thank you for contacting us. This paint is not a chalkboard paint the name is in reference to the color name for the product and we cannot guarantee the results desired with the type of mixture you would like to create. This paint is an acrylic latex but if you use gloves when applying you should be fine. If you have anymore medical questions about our product please call our health line at 412.434.4515
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1 answer

What type of "chalk" paint is this?

This question is from 1-gal. Chalk Stripe Eggshell Interior Paint
Asked by
Gainesville, FL
Read all my Q&A
December 27, 2015
Would this be "blackboard" chalk paint, such as you use for writing and wiping clean, or is this comparable to an antique finish - such as Annie Sloan decorative chalk paint?

If this is not the "antiquing" kind, such as you might use to refinish furniture, what product would be comparable to the Annie Sloan type paint, but that is available in the gallon size or even 5 gal if avail.? I am seeking to avoid having to purchase several containers.

The project I am working on includes refinishing a bureau, tall chest-of-drawers, large dresser, a vintage dark wood games table, a sewing desk, and a nightstand - all re-purposed and refinished. hopefully all to match. I'd need to be cost-conscious, and the most efficient way would be best, since I will need to strip/sand/seal etc. depending on the individuality of each piece, having different compositions of wood and finishes.

If it is better/less expensive/feasible to make my own, I can do so, although I haven't looked into that - any recipes/hints/tips on the process are welcome. Also, would the quality and composition be the same. or similar, depending on the quality of the brand/type of base paint I use? Are there other factors that determine if it comes out the same composition as most pre-mixed chalk bases?

I know it's a long question, I am trying to be thorough and give all the info that might factor in, so thanks so much in advance. I intend to do a little painted artwork in details and designs I intend to paint over the chalk-finish background. Could I use acrylic paint, (if I seal it afterwards - and what type of sealant/finish/polycrylic/wax or whatever it may be, would be best? Also, should I use mineral oil after stripping, since I am painting the wood, anyway? Is citrus stripping the preferred method? - what are the advantages of this? I want a surface that is at least somewhat durable, and I don't want the designs I paint on to flake-off, or bubble or what-have-you.

What about a short-cut of sanding, (w/ an electric hand sander) and a coat of primer on a shiny surface, (and just priming one piece that has a top of pressed wood, as it won't lend itself to sanding) - without stripping the furniture, first? If I need to strip it - I do have two shiny pieces that are solid wood - the other three solid wood pieces are not shiny, and the finish is old enough to be thin and in places, completely non-existent. The one with the shiny, composite pressed wood top is already stripped, sanded and primed except for the non-solid top, as I did it alone as an experiment to try my hand at.

One piece will be re-purposed to hold things my six-yr-old son will be using frequently, so it may need to be somewhat durable. Finally, I'm not sure how much I would need, exactly. I can provide measurements if it helps to calculate the quantities of product required . HELP!

Thanks so much!
Zealeish
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Answer (1)

December 28, 2015
Answer: 
Hello this paint is not a typical chalk paint. It is in fact a regular interior paint that has a color name that includes the work chalk in it which may have caused some confusion. The only specialty paints we have are metallic, polished patina, suede and river rock at this time.
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