Model # 3023

Internet #203536782

Reach Barrier 4 ft. x 250 ft. Silvertanium Reflective Attic Insulation Roll
0853455003023

Reach Barrier

4 ft. x 250 ft. Silvertanium Reflective Attic Insulation Roll

  • Reduces heat and cold loss therefore saving energy and money
  • Passes both US & international building codes
  • Easy to use, install and maintain
$167.45 /each

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Product Overview

Installing a radiant barrier may be the lowest-cost improvement that can produce the greatest overall reduction in energy usage and expense. So the Reach Barrier 3023 Silvertanium Radiant Barrier is an ideal choice for cutting costs and making your home comfortable. It is the only non-laminated reflective insulation product available. It's pliable and easy to use. The highly reflective metallization on both sides and perforation give it great performance and breathability. Silvertanium technology stops 95% of radiant heat and is 30% lighter than other radiant barriers. This insulation is not a multiple-layer laminated product and it will never delaminate and fall apart. The proprietary protective coating will not oxidize or degrade over time, ensuring peak performance throughout the life of the product. At just a fraction of the thickness and weight, this insulation has up to four-times the tear resistance of other brands, making installation dramatically easier. Silvertanium meets all ASTM standards, complies with the international building code and is ideal for: attic spaces, exterior and interior walls, interior masonry walls, radiant floors, metal and steel buildings, crawl spaces, garage ceilings and many other applications where insulation is needed. This insulation roll is 250 ft. long, 48 in. high and 0.01 in. thick.

  • Installing Silvertanium reflective attic insulation barrier is a great DIY project
  • Save on energy costs by reducing energy consumption in your home
  • Entire attic is made cooler or warmer (Not just the living space below)
  • Air conditioning equipment and ductwork within the attic benefit from the more consistent temperatures
  • 100% recyclable
  • Your attic space remains more useable after installation
  • How much do you need? Let our calculator help:
    Insulation calculator button

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Customer Questions & Answers

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Customer Questions & Answers

4 ft. x 250 ft. Silvertanium Reflective Attic Insulation Roll
4 ft. x 250 ft. Silvertanium Reflective Attic Insulation Roll

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6 answers

Can this be used over blown in insulation?

This question is from 4 ft. x 250 ft. Silvertanium Reflective Attic Insulation Roll
Asked by
Inverness Florida
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March 17, 2016
I live in a condo that has minimal blown in insulation. The rafters are all visible. Can I install this on top of the blown in insulation, stapling at the rafters, meaning not on the slanted roof rafters but on the ceiling rafters...meaning it will lay flat on top of the ceiling rafters. There will be an air space between the blown in insulation because there is so little of it. (hope this makes some sense to someone! LOL)
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Answers (6)

Asked by
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
July 18, 2016
Answer: 
In terms of stopping attic heat from making its way into your house this material is not able to do its job if you don't have an airspace between the radiant barrier and the insulation on the floor of your attic. If the radiant barrier is in contact with the attic floor insulation then the heat just conducts from the radiant barrier to the floor insulation.
No air gap = No radiant barrier
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Asked by
Layton UT
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June 10, 2016
Answer: 
Yes, it can be installed over blown in traditional insulations. Traditional insulations work reasonably well with conductive and convective energy transfer, but with radiant energy transfer, such as from the sun passing overhead, they act like a sponge and absorb heat, then pass it on into the living space even after the sun has gone down. Fiber-glass, glass is an excellent conductor of heat. It is best Read More
Yes, it can be installed over blown in traditional insulations. Traditional insulations work reasonably well with conductive and convective energy transfer, but with radiant energy transfer, such as from the sun passing overhead, they act like a sponge and absorb heat, then pass it on into the living space even after the sun has gone down. Fiber-glass, glass is an excellent conductor of heat. It is best installed on the diagonal portion of the rafters since that is closer to the source, the sun, however, the blanket type installation over existing blown in insulation will work, but loses some efficiency with a layer of dust. Read Less
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Asked by
SALEM, OR
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June 3, 2016
Answer: 
Placing the material directly on top of insulation is not recommended. In this type of installation, dust will accumulate on the foil surface facing the roof. In time, the dust will negate the radiant barrier effect. - PER WEBSITE http://www.reachbarrier.com/faqs/tstcat2
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Asked by
Massachusetts
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May 17, 2016
Answer: 
Dear Buddafan: As DIYguy noted, this radiant barrier will help to reduce air leaks into your attic, to reduce heat loss in the winter. That said, it is definitely not as effective as standard insulation -- in the summer or winter. Radiant barriers only reflect radiant (infrared) heat, e.g. heat radiating off a hot metal roof in the summer.
Home Depot sells other solutions that would be much more Read More
Dear Buddafan: As DIYguy noted, this radiant barrier will help to reduce air leaks into your attic, to reduce heat loss in the winter. That said, it is definitely not as effective as standard insulation -- in the summer or winter. Radiant barriers only reflect radiant (infrared) heat, e.g. heat radiating off a hot metal roof in the summer.
Home Depot sells other solutions that would be much more effective in your condo attic. For example:
(1) Foam board: R5 per inch. If your attic is not used as a storage area, foam board is a very effective solution. For example: TUFF-R Model # 268441 Home Depot Internet # 100322376 Store SKU # 163832 You can glue sheets down on top of the ceiling joists. Add multiple layers to boost the R value. Be sure to carefully seal all of the joints and edges to block air leaks. The 'Windows and Doors' version of Great Stuff foam works well; the cured foam remains flexible to prevent cracks as things expand and contract. See: GREAT STUFF Model # 248312 Home Depot Internet # 100068117 Store SKU # 522661 (Foam board is flammable, however, and must be covered by drywall if your attic is accessible and used as a storage area. Do not install it next to anything that gets hot, e.g. a chimney or exhaust vent.)
(2) Rock wool: R4.2 per inch. Roxul rock wool is also easy to install; you could lay batts down between your rafters, over the existing insulation. This would also be much easier to get into your attic if you have a small access panel, compared to foam board. Plus it is not flammable. See: Model # RXCB301525, Home Depot Internet # 205972559. Roxul is also much denser than fiberglass and reduces air flow. Because it is not flammable, you can pack it into gaps around hot exhaust vents or an internal chimney -- to seal air leaks.
(3) Blown-in cellulose: R3 per inch. You could blow in cellulose on top of your existing insulation. See: Model # INS541LD Home Depot Internet # 100318635 Store SKU # 211904 Home Depot rents the blowers; you don't need to hire an installer. To break the 'thermal bridge' with your exposed ceiling joists, add enough to completely cover them. (Wood is a surprisingly good conductor of heat / cold.)
Before you add any insulation, carefully find and seal all of the air leaks into your attic. Recessed ceiling lights are culprit #1: install Tenmat covers and seal the edges with Great Stuff. See: Tenmat Model # FF130E Home Depot Internet # 204286308 Store SKU # 1000012747. Great Stuff is also good to fill gaps and cracks -- but do not use it near anything that gets hot, e.g. a chimney or exhaust vent.
I hope this is helpful. Effective insulation requires more effort and $$.
Mark Read Less
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Asked by
Portland, OR
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April 25, 2016
Answer: 
They are called joists. Rafters hold up the roof. Joists hold up floors and ceilings. Now that we have that cleared up....8-}
Yes, you can use this on the joists. Make sure that you tape the seams and preferably tape the holes where the staples are.
Most energy is lost through air leaks and this will reduce air leaks.
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March 18, 2016
Answer: 
This insulation can be installed on top of blown insulation.
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5 answers

WOULD THIS ALSO HELP REFLECT THE COLD DURING THE WINTER MONTHS ?

This question is from 4 ft. x 250 ft. Silvertanium Reflective Attic Insulation Roll
Asked by
WNY
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August 31, 2015
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Answers (5)

Asked by
Massachusetts
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March 30, 2016
Answer: 
To Phil and other HD customers: One of the people who responded to your question noted that this product would reflect heat back into your house in the winter. This is incorrect. The warm air inside your home is not "radiant" like a hot metal roof in the summer.
That is why Reflectix, for example, claims R7 in a cathedral ceiling in summer -- but only R1 in winter. Even though the air next to the Read More
To Phil and other HD customers: One of the people who responded to your question noted that this product would reflect heat back into your house in the winter. This is incorrect. The warm air inside your home is not "radiant" like a hot metal roof in the summer.
That is why Reflectix, for example, claims R7 in a cathedral ceiling in summer -- but only R1 in winter. Even though the air next to the ceiling is warmer than anything else in the house, it is not 'radiant' (emitting infrared energy) and the shiny surface has almost no impact.
I hope this clarifies things.
Mark Read Less
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Asked by
Portland, OR
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November 30, 2015
Answer: 
No it will not. For this purpose cold is the absence of energy so to speak. The colder it gets the less radiant energy there is to reflect.
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Asked by
Massachusetts
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November 29, 2015
Answer: 
Dear Phil: Good question! First, "radiant barrier" insulation is only effective if you build / create a sealed air barrier on one side. Second, it is much less effective in winter vs summer because there is little radiant heat for the shiny surface to reflect. (Cold cannot be "reflected".) Reflectix, for example, claims R7 in a cathedral ceiling in summer but only R1 in winter, in the northern US.
Home Read More
Dear Phil: Good question! First, "radiant barrier" insulation is only effective if you build / create a sealed air barrier on one side. Second, it is much less effective in winter vs summer because there is little radiant heat for the shiny surface to reflect. (Cold cannot be "reflected".) Reflectix, for example, claims R7 in a cathedral ceiling in summer but only R1 in winter, in the northern US.
Home Depot sells a number of other insulation products that are effective, winter and summer, which you can install yourself, e.g. foam board, Roxul rock wool and blown cellulose for attics -- all of which we have used on a number of projects. For example see:
Foam board: Owens Corning Model # 52DD Internet # 202085962 Store SKU # 307101
Rock wool: Roxul Model # RXCB351525 Internet # 202090820 Store SKU # 974419
Blown cellulose: Green Fiber Model # INS541LD Internet # 100318635 Store SKU # 211904
I hope this is helpful.
Mark Read Less
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Asked by
Northern New England
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October 18, 2015
Answer: 
Yes & No.
First the no - technically, cold can't be deflected, so strictly speaking it won't. However, to the point you're after...it will reflect heat (sourced inside your house) back into your house. So, it's equal opportunity...whatever direction it comes from, it sends it right back out (or at least, gives it the ol' college try!).
It will reflect (realistically) 80-90% of RADIANT heat. in Read More
Yes & No.
First the no - technically, cold can't be deflected, so strictly speaking it won't. However, to the point you're after...it will reflect heat (sourced inside your house) back into your house. So, it's equal opportunity...whatever direction it comes from, it sends it right back out (or at least, gives it the ol' college try!).
It will reflect (realistically) 80-90% of RADIANT heat. in conjunction with air sealing, and a good quality blanket of 'normal' (ie, conductive) insulation, you'll see some good results summer & winter. Read Less
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September 1, 2015
Answer: 
Yes, this product helps with both cooling and warming the space.
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3 answers

this on top of fiberglass(panther) insulation?

This question is from 4 ft. x 250 ft. Silvertanium Reflective Attic Insulation Roll
Asked by
NY
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October 1, 2016
I have a bare attic with no insulation at all.
I was looking into installing fiberglass the pink panther rolls between the rafts
and I'm wondering if I still need to do that or would it be better to still use the fiberglass
and staples these on top of them. is it not necessary?
and can you put sheet rocks directly on top of these foils?
wouldn't create any vapor/mold issues on the sheetrock?
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Answers (3)

Asked by
Massachusetts
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October 4, 2016
Answer: 
Dear Sugar123: DIYguy caught a typo in my answer. He is correct -- insulation batts should be installed between your ceiling joists in a standard ventilated attic, not the rafters that support the roof.

Sorry for the error,

Mark
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Asked by
Portland, OR
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October 2, 2016
Answer: 
It all depends on your location.
For unheated spaces put the fiber insulation between the joists rather than the rafters. A good rule of thumb is to insulate as close as you can to the living space. In hot climates i.e. southwest, insulate the joist spaces and install this reflective material over the rafters to reflect the radiant heat.
In high humidity locations you have to make sure that there Read More
It all depends on your location.
For unheated spaces put the fiber insulation between the joists rather than the rafters. A good rule of thumb is to insulate as close as you can to the living space. In hot climates i.e. southwest, insulate the joist spaces and install this reflective material over the rafters to reflect the radiant heat.
In high humidity locations you have to make sure that there is enough air flow to prevent moisture from building up in any insulated space. Not having some air flow can cause rot and mildew buildup. Read Less
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Asked by
Massachusetts
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October 2, 2016
Answer: 
Dear Sugar123: Insulating your attic is a smart move -- particularly if you live in an area with hot summers or cold winters. >60% of the heat lost in a home goes up through the roof, and heat from your roof will drive up summer air conditioning bills. Here are a few tips:

(1) Step 1: Seal all air leaks. Before you add any insulation, carefully find and seal all of the air leaks into your attic.
Read More
Dear Sugar123: Insulating your attic is a smart move -- particularly if you live in an area with hot summers or cold winters. >60% of the heat lost in a home goes up through the roof, and heat from your roof will drive up summer air conditioning bills. Here are a few tips:

(1) Step 1: Seal all air leaks. Before you add any insulation, carefully find and seal all of the air leaks into your attic. Recessed ceiling lights are culprit #1: install Tenmat covers and seal the edges with DAP 230 sealant. See: Tenmat Model # FF130E Hoe Depot Internet # 204286308 Store SKU # 1000012747 and DAP 230, Home Depot Internet #100035980 Store SKU #284425 Store SO SKU #1000058280 Great Stuff foam is good to fill larger gaps and holes -- but do not use it near anything that gets hot, e.g. a chimney or exhaust vent. For gaps near a hot exhaust vent, fill the space with Roxul rock wool, then cover it with fire resistant sealant, e.g. 3M Model CP-25WB+, Home Depot Internet #100166701 Store SKU #163096 For the large gap next to a chimney, cover it with aluminum flashing (available at Home Depot) nailed to the joists, and seal the edges with DAP 230.

(2) Rock wool: Instead of fiberglass, install bats of Roxul rock wool. It is much denser than fiberglass, and delivers R4.2 per inch. Rock wool is also easy to install; just lay batts down between your rafters. Plus it is not flammable. See: Model # RXCB301525, Home Depot Internet # 205972559. Because it is not flammable, you can also pack it into gaps around hot exhaust vents or an internal chimney -- to seal air leaks. If you live in an area with cold winters, it would be a good idea to lay a second layer down on top of the first, over your rafters -- to double the total insulation. Run the batts in the opposite direction. (This obviously will not work if you want to use your attic for storage. See #4, below.)

(3) Reflective barrier: Silvertanium and other "reflective barriers" are only effective if you have hot summers and need to reflect the heat from your roof. They are not a substitute for standard insulation, and are not effective in winter. If you do have hot summers, you have two options: (a) If your attic will NOT be used for storage, simply lay the reflective barrier over your insulation. You do not need to fasten it down. (b) If you attic WILL be used for storage, staple the reflective barrier to the surface of your rafters -- all of the way from the bottom near the soffit vents to the top. Carefully seal all of the edges and joints to block air leaks. DO NOT use Silvertanium on your rafters, however -- it is perforated and will leak hot air. Use Reflectix instead. See: Reflectix Model ST16025, Home Depot Internet #100012574 Store SKU #884250

(4) Sheet rock: You mentioned installing sheet rock "directly on top of these foils". There is no need for sheet rock. If you want to create a floor in your attic, e.g. for storage, use 3/4" plywood. If you live in an area with cold winters and have the budget, install 2" XPS foam board first, over your ceiling joists, then install the 3/4" plywood floor on top of the foam board. This will boost total insulation by R10. See: Owens Corning Model 24DD, Home Depot Internet #100320335 Store SKU #528022 Store SO SKU #192627

(5) Foam board: If your attic is NOT going to be used as a storage area, foam board is a very effective solution with R5+ per inch. For example: TUFF-R Model # 268441 Home Depot Internet # 100322376 Store SKU # 163832 After you install rock wool batts between your ceiling joists, nail or screw sheets of foam board down on top of the ceiling joists. Add multiple layers to boost the R value. Be sure to carefully seal all of the joints and edges to block air leaks, with DAP 230 and Great Stuff. (Foam board is flammable, however, and must be covered by plywood or drywall if your attic is accessible and used as a storage area. Do not install it next to anything that gets hot, e.g. a chimney or exhaust vent.)

I hope all of this detail is helpful.

Mark
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3 answers

Will this product reduce my cell phone reception, once installed?

This question is from 4 ft. x 250 ft. Silvertanium Reflective Attic Insulation Roll
Asked by
Texas
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August 13, 2016
One of the concerns I have with installing radiant barriers is a reduction in cell phone reception. Has anyone noticed a significant reduction in signal strength after installing it?
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Asked by
Harrison, NJ
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August 22, 2016
Answer: 
No. Don't worry.
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Asked by
Portland, OR
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August 14, 2016
Answer: 
That is a very good question. I suggest that you contact the manufacturer. Theoretically this product could produce a Faraday cage and block weaker radio signals.
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Asked by
Massachusetts
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August 14, 2016
Answer: 
Dear Froggman: This has been recurring question in the construction industry with aluminum siding, foil faced polyiso foam board, radiant / reflective barrier products, etc. -- but no professional studies have been done that I am aware of.

Any layer of metal will have some impact on radio frequency signals. That said, there will still be many ways for cellular radio signals to enter and leave your
Read More
Dear Froggman: This has been recurring question in the construction industry with aluminum siding, foil faced polyiso foam board, radiant / reflective barrier products, etc. -- but no professional studies have been done that I am aware of.

Any layer of metal will have some impact on radio frequency signals. That said, there will still be many ways for cellular radio signals to enter and leave your home, e.g. via walls, windows and doors. In most populated areas, a cell phone can connect to 3 or more antennas located in different directions. So a radiant barrier is likely to have a noticeable impact only if you already have weak cell coverage.

If you find that this is the case, cell signal boosters are available to increase the signal strength inside your home, e.g from WeBoost (AKA Wilson).

Before you invest in any radiant barrier, also read up on where they are effective, installation requirements and sealed air gaps, and the lack of performance in winter -- because 'cold' cannot be reflected and warm air in your home is not radiant.

I hope this is helpful,

Mark
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Customer Reviews

Rated 4.6 out of 5 by 36 reviewers.
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Tuff stuff Purchased this and installed in my shed just tacking it to the bottom of the rafters and the wall studs, then installed Masonite panels for a finished look. Wow, this dropped the temp in the shed by a good 10 - 15 degrees. The product is very tuff, just rolled it around the room, and used a staple gun to attach to the walls. My shed is a 10 x 20, so I used about 2/3rds of the roll to enclose the entire thing. Way worth the money spent, glad I did it. shed is now like being under a tree. June 28, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Good product past the inspection in New Haven CT I needed additional layer on the R30 faced insulation in the attic for fireproof. Instead of cover the attic ceiling with drywall I used this product and pass the inspection. October 4, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Awesome This keeps my barn so much cooler I'm glad our builder this. October 4, 2016
Rated 2.0 out of 5.0 by Meh? I bought this insulation as a (hopefully) cheaper option than that foil backed rigid foam insulation or installing an air conditioner, in order to keep the temperature down in my garage. The product probably does as advertised, which is deflect radiant heat. It did, in fact, reduce the temps in the attic space by about 10 degrees (105f down to 95f). The problem is that unless there is a place for the hot air to go it will still get hot in the ceiling. I ended up spending about $250 on a solar powered attic fan and it immediately vented the attic and cooled the space down. If you already have a roof vent then this product will probably work better for you than for me. The product is well made. It is tear resistant, easy to staple in place (the stapler is a separate review...Grrrr.) and east to trim. August 15, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Well worth the money and time to install! The material is Tarp-like and much thicker and stronger than I thought it would be. I thought it was going to be similar to an emergency blanket but it is actually more like a plastic tarp but with a tighter weave. This means that it is not able to be used as a moisture barrier but that it is also much more durable. The way that I used it was for the attic in my house to help reflect the heat back into the house. I rolled it out across the rafters and placed insulation both above and below the barrier. To validate the improvement I timed how frequently my furnace turned on when it was about 45 degrees outside. Before the Barrier Installation: Every 22 minutes After the Barrier Installation: Every 35 minutes For the purposes of my install it is likely that some of my improvements were due to me fluffing up the old insulation during installation, but there was clearly an improvement with the installation of the barrier as well. January 14, 2016
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Strong and Flexible The Silvertanium Radiant Barrier is easy to work with, strong and flexible to install around obstacles. Cuts easily with a sharp utility knife. August 9, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by works great recommend nice thickness works well cant say much more reordered and using in a different attic area June 29, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Terrific Insulation The Silvertanium Reflective Attic Insulation was very easy to install and seems to be very durable. I would recommend this product as an addition to the standard insulating materials used for home insulation. December 9, 2014
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