0716511400030

Reflectix

Model RB4812550

Internet #203927012

Store SKU #223310

48 in. x 125 ft. Heavy-Duty Perforated Radiant Barrier

$65.84 /each
  • Great for energy efficiency
  • Works well in attics
  • 48 in. x 125 ft. Heavy-Duty Perforated Radiant Barrier

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Product Overview

Lower your energy bills with Reflectix radiant barrier. A perfect solution for attic insulation, it blocks 94% or more of the radiant heat that normally would be transferred to your attic floor. That keeps the attic cooler and means less air conditioning usage, up to 10% less, for lower utility bills. Attic-mounted duct systems also benefit dramatically from our Reflectix radiant barrier. It is easy to handle, and can be used in cathedral ceilings or as a house wrap behind brick or siding.

  • Product has a class A / class 1 building material fire rating
  • New, heavy duty (polyester woven fabric), radiant barrier energy saving product
  • Convenient 500 sq. ft. size rolls
  • Easy to handle and install
  • Blocks 94%+ of radiant energy from entering your home
  • Dramatically reduces attic surface temperatures resulting in a cooler home
  • Tools required include a utility knife, staple gun, safety glasses and a tape measure
  • No mess and no itchy fibers
  • How much do you need? Let our calculator help:

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Customer Questions & Answers

12 Questions32 Answers

Customer Questions & Answers

48 in. x 125 ft. Heavy-Duty Perforated Radiant Barrier
48 in. x 125 ft. Heavy-Duty Perforated Radiant Barrier

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5 answers

I currently have fiberglass insullation for my garage door. If this were mounted behind the fiberglass, against the garage door, would it improve it?

This question is from 48 in. x 125 ft. Heavy-Duty Perforated Radiant Barrier
Asked by
Dallas, Texas
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June 6, 2016
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Answers (5)

Asked by
east Ttennessee
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July 19, 2016
Answer: 
It probably wouldn't add any benefit, other than keeping the insulation paper from ripping if you put it on the inward side. Then if you use a space heater in the garage, it would reflect heat back inward.
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Asked by
Massachusetts
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
July 19, 2016
Answer: 
Dear Tom: No. All radiant barriers require a sealed air gap on one side. This air gap provides almost all of the insulation R value. The shiny plastic has almost no R value.

So if you simply attach or sandwich the reflective barrier between the fiberglass and the garage door, it will make very little difference.

I hope this is helpful.

Mark
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Asked by
Arizona/Oregon
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
June 8, 2016
Answer: 
I live in Az part of the year where the sun can be very overpowering to say the least. The house I bought received direct sunlight on the garage door making the garage unbearably hot. I had used fiberglass panels in other homes in the past and was quite pleased. This is the first house that I used the radiant barrier as a first step. I felt it made a significant difference in stopping the radiant heat Read More
I live in Az part of the year where the sun can be very overpowering to say the least. The house I bought received direct sunlight on the garage door making the garage unbearably hot. I had used fiberglass panels in other homes in the past and was quite pleased. This is the first house that I used the radiant barrier as a first step. I felt it made a significant difference in stopping the radiant heat from getting thru to the insulation. I haven't done significant temperature tests but I am convinced for the added cost it was worth it in my situation. The amount that you are buying with this roll will be way more than you need. It would be nice if the barrier was available in smaller quantities. At this point I have several feet left and if I hadn't just insulated my attic with blown in insulation making access throughout the attic very difficult I would be putting it against the rafters as well. Read Less
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Asked by
Texas
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June 7, 2016
Answer: 
No. Your best bet is solid foam sheets, preferably 3/4 or one inch thick. Radiant barrier not really effective with metal.
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June 7, 2016
Answer: 
If you sandwich the radiant barrier between the garage door and the fiber glass you would get minimal performance. Reflectix products are made to be installed with air space on at least one side. The reflectivity on the side with the air space can be up to 96%.
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4 answers

can i use this under a foam insulated metal roof

This question is from 48 in. x 125 ft. Heavy-Duty Perforated Radiant Barrier
Asked by
kona Hi
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July 18, 2016
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Answers (4)

July 20, 2016
Answer: 
You can install the radiant barrier under the foam insulated roof if you leave it exposed. If you cover it the performance will be minimal.
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Asked by
Massachusetts
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July 20, 2016
Answer: 
Dear Arch: NO. Select a non-perforated version of Reflectix or other radiant barrier product. Perforation eliminates the ability to create a sealed air pocket on one side, which is essential for under-roof applications. This air gap provides almost all of the insulation R value, because the thin plastic in the radiant barrier has almost no R value. The perforated version allows air to pass through the Read More
Dear Arch: NO. Select a non-perforated version of Reflectix or other radiant barrier product. Perforation eliminates the ability to create a sealed air pocket on one side, which is essential for under-roof applications. This air gap provides almost all of the insulation R value, because the thin plastic in the radiant barrier has almost no R value. The perforated version allows air to pass through the radiant barrier, defeating the purpose for this application.

With a non-perforated radiant barrier, there are a couple of caveats:

(1) As noted above, you must create a sealed or externally vented air gap between the roof and the radiant barrier. Otherwise, the reflected heat will simply warm the inner surface of the roof and the surrounding air even more, which will flow into your building as it did before -- for no net benefit. If you have a flat unvented metal roof, a sealed air gap is best. Use foil HVAC tape to join panels and seal the edges. DAP 230 sealant is also helpful.

(2) Radiant barriers are not effective in the winter because cold cannot be 'reflected' and the warm air inside your building is not radiant. So if you need to heat your building in the winter, additional standard insulation would be more effective. Spray foam or foam board is most effective with R5 per inch, but it is very flammable and must be covered by drywall. If this is not an option, Roxul ComfortBoard is best -- R4 per inch and fire resistant. A version with foil facing is also available by special order from your Home Depot Pro or Customer Service Desk; ask for Roxul Rockboard 60 with foil facing. This provides a finished surface with a better appearance that is easy to clean.

I hope this is helpful,

Mark
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Asked by
Arizona
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July 20, 2016
Answer: 
I don't think this is within the manufacturers suggested uses and this is my opinion only. It should work if you can lay the material without causing slipping hazard and you can lay it without ripping it or destroying it while installing the metal roof. That application may be to cumbersome but could be worth a try. As far as being effective under the roof my vote is yes.
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Asked by
east Ttennessee
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July 20, 2016
Answer: 
It works best if there's an air space between the foil and the foam insulation. I'd use furring strips or small molding strips to provide that air space. Conversely the package instructions say you can cut it and staple directly to the wood between rafters, so maybe it would be effective on foam as well. Best bet, call Reflectix at 800-879-3645 or 765-533-4332 and get a definite answer.
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3 answers

Would this be a good product to use between joists on top of fiberglass insulation underneath radiant heat tubing?

This question is from 48 in. x 125 ft. Heavy-Duty Perforated Radiant Barrier
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August 17, 2016
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Answers (3)

Asked by
Massachusetts
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August 26, 2016
Answer: 
Dear Paul:

Well, yes and no. Plastic (PEX) radiant heat tubing does not 'radiate' heat effectively, so you are right to try to maximize the insulation underneath -- to keep the heat above. Fiberglass is a poor choice, however, for insulation. Foam board is more effective and will also help you air-seal the joist bay -- which is almost as important as insulation R value.

Tuff-R polyiso foam board
Read More
Dear Paul:

Well, yes and no. Plastic (PEX) radiant heat tubing does not 'radiate' heat effectively, so you are right to try to maximize the insulation underneath -- to keep the heat above. Fiberglass is a poor choice, however, for insulation. Foam board is more effective and will also help you air-seal the joist bay -- which is almost as important as insulation R value.

Tuff-R polyiso foam board is the best option with R6 per inch of thickness. This will also eliminate the need to install a 'radiant barrier', because Tuff-R includes foil facing. See: TUFF-R Model 193829, Home Depot Internet #100322375 Store SKU #163524 Store SO SKU #621947

When you install it, carefully seal all of the edges and joints to block air leaks. DAP 230 works well for smaller gaps. The 'Windows and Doors' version of Great Stuff spray foam is good for larger gaps. (The cured foam remains flexible to avoid cracks as things expand and contract.) To hold the foam board panels in place while you seal them, insulation installation wires work well. See: Simpson Strong-Tie Model IS16-R100, Home Depot Internet #100375163 Store SKU #594333 Store SO SKU #592854

I hope this is helpful.

Mark
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Asked by
Arizona
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
August 17, 2016
Answer: 
I would call the manufacturer and ask them. I have no experience with that application. Contact info below.
Mailing Address:
Reflectix, Inc., P.O. Box 108, Markleville, IN 46056
Social Media:
www.facebook.com/ReflectixInsulation
www.youtube.com/ReflectixInsulation
Email:
customerservice@reflectixinc.com
Phone:
(765) 533-4332 or (800) 879-3645 (in US / Canada)
Fax:
(765)
Read More
I would call the manufacturer and ask them. I have no experience with that application. Contact info below.
Mailing Address:
Reflectix, Inc., P.O. Box 108, Markleville, IN 46056
Social Media:
www.facebook.com/ReflectixInsulation
www.youtube.com/ReflectixInsulation
Email:
customerservice@reflectixinc.com
Phone:
(765) 533-4332 or (800) 879-3645 (in US / Canada)
Fax:
(765) 533-2327
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August 17, 2016
Answer: 
We do not recommend using the radiant barrier between the floor joist under radiant heat tubing. The product we recommend using for this application is the double bubble product that is reflective on both side. This product begins with "BP".
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3 answers

What is the reason for perforating the radiant barrier?

This question is from 48 in. x 125 ft. Heavy-Duty Perforated Radiant Barrier
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April 20, 2016
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Answers (3)

Asked by
Massachusetts
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August 26, 2016
Answer: 
Dear Vixkix: Without perforation, this product would function as a complete vapor barrier -- which is often avoided to allow walls to 'breath' and dry to one side. With perforation, it functions as a vapor retarder, similar to house wrap.

Also note, however, that 'reflective / radiant' barrier products depend on a sealed air pocket on one side to provide the claimed insulation R value. The shiny
Read More
Dear Vixkix: Without perforation, this product would function as a complete vapor barrier -- which is often avoided to allow walls to 'breath' and dry to one side. With perforation, it functions as a vapor retarder, similar to house wrap.

Also note, however, that 'reflective / radiant' barrier products depend on a sealed air pocket on one side to provide the claimed insulation R value. The shiny plastic has almost no R value. Perforation allows air to leak through, which defeats the purpose. I am not aware of any independent studies that document the performance of a perforated radiant barrier -- except for one application: in an attic in the summer, to block radiant heat from a hot roof.

I hope this is helpful,

Mark
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Asked by
Arizona
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June 8, 2016
Answer: 
My guess would be moisture release when put against wood.
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April 21, 2016
Answer: 
The perforation allows for moisture vapor to pass through.
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Customer Reviews

Rated 4.4 out of 5 by 18 reviewers.
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Strong material, but needs better quality control Purchased two rolls, both had quality issues where they were wrinkled. Fortunately after stapling it flattened a bit. August 16, 2016
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Reduced Attic Temps I purchased this material to reduce the temperature of the attic storage space above my garage. We are in the Pacific Northwest where this sort of barrier is not commonly used. I stapled it to the underside of the rafters. After covering the underside of just one roof plane, facing southwest, I've noticed a measurable reduction in temperature. Before this product, The high attic temps were about 14 degrees higher than the highs outside , sometimes as much as 19 degrees. After installation under just one side of the attic roof, the attic high temps are averaging only 7 degrees above the outdoor temps. What I find more surprising is that the initial temperatures were measured in May and June, with an average high outside of 78, with a maximum of 101. The temperatures with the material installed were measured in August, with an average of 95. Furthermore, the garage attic space is open on one side to the rest of the house attic, including a large south-facing roof plane. I assumed the heat gain from the rest of the space would equalize with the space above the garage, making the barrier ineffective, but the numbers seem to prove otherwise. This product seems quite effective, and was cost effective at about $65 a roll. Installation was straight forward with a staple gun and utility knife, but is definitely a two person job. The large pieces can be unwieldy, particularly in tight spots under the attic roof. August 16, 2016
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Noticable diffrence I installed this insulation on my roof under metal panels and my attic has reduced in temperature by atleast a few degrees. Was very easy to install and very duable. August 9, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Very strong & easy to work with The title says it all. I really like this product. It's inexpensive for the quality, and I can attest that it's a lot better than some other competing brands (based on their reviewers' comments). I'm quite happy I bought this. It's very easy to make holes for receptacles and switches, and the cut-out area doesn't rip beyond where you wanted it. As an added bonus, I didn't have any help and was able to put this up onto ceiling rafters fairly easily. I would recommend getting help though. Two people make it twice as easy and probably twice as fast. I can't really attest to how well it performs because I just put it in. It seems to be helping but haven't made any analysis. Scientific lab results are good enough for me. I'm not going to second-guess professional testers. If radiant foil does what it' supposed to do, I'd guess this does it better than average. It's very shiny on both sides and can be made taut along the rafters where I put mine. If I have any criticism it would be that I'd like the rolls to be 48.5 inches wide instead of 4 feet. It wouldn't hurt anything to overlap an extra half-inch. But it's a real pain when careless construction puts the studs so far apart that you only have an eighth of an inch to staple into. With 16-inch spacing, 4 studs should be 48 inches center to center but often they aren't. I have 120 sq ft left of the roll. I also have faced insulation that goes into the roof peak of my storage shed. That peak area needs the paper covered for fire safety. It's a real waste of money to put plywood or paneling up there, to say nothing of how hard it is to cut all those angles. Covering that Kraft paper with foil easily gives a super-tough surface that matches the ceiling and basically costs nothing. I know it has no insulation or radiant benefit installed that way. One caveat (if used as a wall covering) if you get direct sunlight on it at some hours of the day, spray paint it to prevent eye damage. July 19, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Way better than the stuff I bought on ebay I purchased a roll off of ebay and needed more to finish the attic, so I went to Home Depot and purchased this roll. The difference was remarkable! when they say HEAVY DUTY they mean it, the ebay roll was very thin I would guess half as thin as this one. I should have used this product from the beginning. March 10, 2016
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Installed under siding Easy to install. I'm hoping this will do something for me in the Florida heat, something is better than nothing right? February 10, 2015
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Garage door radiant barrier, Anyone else think of this?? I read about this product for use in attics etc. In all of my houses I have always installed garage door insulation available in kits from Home Depot. I purchase the regular garage door insulation kit from the Depot and ordered the radiant barrier from the Depot for delivery as the store did not have it in stock. I used a can of spray adhesive to attach the radiant barrier to the insulating panels. You could tell the difference immediately. I know the insulation works well but the addition of the radiant barrier should help as well. January 1, 2014
Rated 2.0 out of 5.0 by CHECK IT FOR DEFECTS!! I bought 6 of these rolls. 5 were ok, the 6th had MAJOR defects. Unfortunately I had no choice but to us it as I couldn't wait a week to do siding. I'll post a picture of the defective stuff. The plastic matrix was great - the reflectivity was only half applied - a typical mfr defect for this type of stuff. Great stuff, nice, strong, easy to use - but buyer beware!!! July 29, 2014
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