0697285251007

SharkBite

Model U860R100

Internet #202033011

Store SKU #353498

Store SO SKU #1000471335

1/2 in. x 100 ft. Red PEX Pipe

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Product Overview

SharkBite PEX is a cross-linked polyethylene tubing best suited for potable water supply application. PEX Pipe is durable, flexible and corrosion resistant. SharkBite PEX features a repeating SharkBite imprint pattern that provides a visual aid to help you determine whether the tube has been fully inserted when using the SharkBite push-fit fitting range. In addition to Potable Water Supply SharkBite PEX meets UL Standard for Plastic Piping in Fire Systems.

  • Strong, flexible, corrosion-resistant pipe
  • Flexibility reduces number of fittings needed to complete a job; reducing cost and leak points
  • Can be installed wet or dry for immediate pressure testing
  • SharkBite imprint pattern provides a visual aid to ensure pipe is fully inserted when using SharkBite push-to-connect fittings
  • SharkBite system provides a variety of connection options, SharkBite PEX can be connected with SharkBite push-to-connect fittings or barbed fittings
  • Listed to NSF 14 and CSA B137.5 for use in potable water systems
  • Meets UL1821 standard for plastic piping for fire systems (3/4 in. and 1 in. only)
  • Manufactured and tested to meet or exceed the requirements of the ASTM F-876/877/2023 and CSA B137.5

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Customer Questions & Answers

8 Questions12 Answers

Customer Questions & Answers

1/2 in. x 100 ft. Red PEX Pipe
1/2 in. x 100 ft. Red PEX Pipe

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This question is from 1/2 in. x 100 ft. Red PEX Pipe
 
3 answers

on the pex pipe it shows the min. working temp is 32. what does that mean?

This question is from 1/2 in. x 100 ft. Red PEX Pipe
Asked by
dan
December 12, 2012
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Asked by
So Cal
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March 19, 2014
Answer: 
It is designed for potable water. Below 32 degrees, it freezes, so the minimum temperature for this pex to work is above freezing. You should protect the PEX from below freezing temperatures, but PEX is much less likely to fracture that copper, PVC, or galvanized steel in freezing conditions.
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Asked by
Southern California
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
October 31, 2013
Answer: 
It means you should not use PEX pipe when the temperature you are working in is below freezing. PEX should only be run INSIDE a house. It is not recommended to even be used in the garage. UV rays from sunlight will damage PEX.
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December 12, 2012
Answer: 
This simply means that the water within the pipe must be above freezing temperatures.
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This question is from 1/2 in. x 100 ft. Red PEX Pipe
 
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SHOULD I INSULATE 43 FEET OF RED SHARKBITE TUBING IN A COLD BASEMENT ABOUT 37 DEREES F

This question is from 1/2 in. x 100 ft. Red PEX Pipe
Asked by
ALLENTOWN PA
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March 9, 2014
WITH 3/4 " POLY INSULATION
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March 19, 2014
Answer: 
I would.
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Asked by
Atlanta, GA
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Home Improvement Profile: Other
March 17, 2014
Answer: 
It definitely couldn't hurt to insulate tubing installed in conditions near freezing. To save time, you can purchase a pre-insulated roll of PEX. This can be seen at:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/SharkBite-1-2-in-x-100-ft-PEX-Pipe-with-3-4-in-Insulation-U860I100/203316941
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This question is from 1/2 in. x 100 ft. Red PEX Pipe
 
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Where is this made?

This question is from 1/2 in. x 100 ft. Red PEX Pipe
Asked by
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January 10, 2014
Country or origin?
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Asked by
So Cal
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March 19, 2014
Answer: 
USA
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Asked by
Atlanta, GA
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January 10, 2014
Answer: 
This is manufactured in Cullman, Alabama.
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This question is from 1/2 in. x 100 ft. Red PEX Pipe
 
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Can you use the SharkBite 1/2 in x 100ft PEX pipeto make angle turns? Or do you have to use elbows in all turns?

This question is from 1/2 in. x 100 ft. Red PEX Pipe
Asked by
Tom Crha
Seattle
March 24, 2013
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Asked by
So Cal
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March 19, 2014
Answer: 
Yes. Large gradual turns require nothing. Smaller 90-degree turns you should use the 90-degree bend support (http://www.homedepot.com/p/SharkBite-1-2-in-PEX-Pipe-Plastic-Bend-Support-23050/202032947). If you need it to to turn sharply, I would use an elbow fitting.
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March 25, 2013
Answer: 
You can use PEX to make angle turns, just be sure not to kink the pipe. See attached for more detailed PEX installation instructions.
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Customer Reviews

Rated 4.3 out of 5 by 7 reviewers.
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by CAUTION: very brittle Sharkbite tubing is brittle and will break off (snap off) if flexed beyond it's (minimal) elastic limit. I used Sharkbite tubing purchased from HD for potable water in a new house on a concrete slab foundation. The Sharkbite tubing broke off (snapped off like a dry twig) flush with the concrete slab, even though it was properly shielded (per code) within a 3/4 flex conduit in the area where it emerged from the concrete slab. I have been forced to abandon Sharkbite tubing which was carefully placed under the slab, and install other tubing in the walls, above the slab. Plumbing contractor remarked that he would not use this tubing again. March 19, 2015
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by PEX Pipe Light and easy to handle. Easy to install. Buy the good crimping tool to make the job a breeze. July 14, 2015
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by $27 of PEX + 2 Sharkbite Elbows ($17) saved me $950! Have previous DIY experience with copper pipes, but am a PEX convert now. Needed to run a "bypass" line due to a broken hot water pipe in the concrete subfloor. Plumber quoted me $1000 to run this bypass from one bathroom, up through the attic, and down into the wall behind the Master bathroom plumbing connection. It took me 2 hours, and these $50 in parts. PEX is great! October 31, 2013
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by good but difficult to handle pex tubing in general with sharkbite fittings is very easy to use, coiled pex is a mixed blessing in that it may save fittings if you have long runs but you have to wrestle it, easier if two people are working with it, otherwise, next time I'll use the 20' straight lengths and pay the extra if necessary October 15, 2013
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Per is Awesome This stuff is great. No sweating copper! Easy to work with and you can run it like Romex. Tons of fittings and much cheaper than copper. March 17, 2012
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Good quality I like this stuff better than some other companies I purchased. December 11, 2012
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Just re-piped my whole house with PEX Back story: I discovered I had a slab leak on my hot water line under my bathroom and upon further investigation discovered a cold water leak under my entryway. Being in Ventura County, CA our water is hard and my tract home was made cheap. It was built 30 years ago with copper in the slab foundation. The plastic sheathing they used to isolate the copper from the concrete was super thin and subsequently eroded as the pipes expanded and contracted with temperature. This lead to major corrosion of the copper (especially in the hot water line) from the outside and the predominance of minerals in our hot water corroded the insides of the copper. I knew this would be a problem when I bought the house, as I have lived in the neighborhood for a while. Many neighbors have all had similar issues and paid big money to patch or re-pipe. My background: I am an avid DIY-er with just about every type of project. Electrical, plumbing, heating/AC, appliances, etc. I have patched and repaired many types of plumbing including copper, galvie, ABS, and PVC. I was new to PEX. What I did: I did a lot of research before making the purchase and weighed all of my options. I considered paying a plumber, doing it myself, using copper, and using PEX. I decided on PEX and wanted to do a manifold system so I can easily remodel my bathrooms in the future without turning off the whole house water supply. My house is a 1550sqft single-story house with 2 full bathrooms. I opted to replace the 1" copper line where it comes in to the garage from the shut-off valve outside and run it to the manifold location near the water heater. I split the 1" copper with a "T" and reduced it to 3/4" copper to the water heater supply and the cold-water side of the manifold. I used 3/4" SharkBite PEX stubs to feed into the manifold for a little flexibility. I ran 1/2" PEX to each fixture. I used red PEX for hot and blue PEX for cold. I wanted to reduce the amount of fitting and connectors in the system, but used 1/2" PEX to used copper stub-outs with new compression fitting valves to lead to each fixture; I didn't like the idea of the PEX sticking out of the walls. I used the stainless cinch-ring clips because the crimper is a bit smaller and fits in tighter spaces. I opted for the 100' rolls of the PEX so I could have a direct shot to each fixture without any unions along the way. The Review: PEX, though flexible, is still fairly rigid and a bit tough to uncoil, but much better than copper. With a little patience and coercion, I was able to thread it through the headers and down the walls with minimal drywall cutting. I used 90-degree angle guides to protect the bends. Using the cinch rings at the connection points was easy. It took me 53 hours of work over the span of 4 days to complete the project (drywall repair included). It would have been a bit faster, but I had to cut a hole in part of my roof to access a header above the kitchen sink. Bottom Line: I am beyond thrilled with this product and how easy it was to install. I was able to re-pipe my entire house by myself in a few days for less than $1000. The copper portion alone cost me $300, so that puts the PEX at $700. March 19, 2014
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