0707392885702

Simpson Strong-Tie

Model FPBS44

Internet #100655352

Store SO SKU #1000114687

12-Gauge Black Powder-Coated E-Z Spike

$22.65 /each

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Product Overview

Replacing an entire fence can be an expensive and difficult task. Now it's easy for you to get your fence back in shape and your home back to looking its best. Simpson Strong-Tie offers a line of products designed specifically to help you make some of the most common fence repairs, easily and economically.

  • Allows easy installation of 4 in. x 4 in. wood posts without digging holes or pouring concrete
  • Can be used for a variety of applications where quick-to-install posts are needed
  • Can be used on a single 2x stud
  • Great for mailbox posts
  • Made from 12-Gauge steel
  • Black powder-coat
  • Install with 1/4 in. SDS screws or 1/4 in. HDG lag screws

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Customer Questions & Answers

23 Questions70 Answers

Customer Questions & Answers

12-Gauge Black Powder-Coated E-Z Spike
12-Gauge Black Powder-Coated E-Z Spike

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7 answers

How do you get it into the ground? Rubber malet? Do I put the wood post on first, then put it in?

This question is from 12-Gauge Black Powder-Coated E-Z Spike
Asked by
portland
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October 9, 2013
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Answers (7)

Asked by
MO
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May 5, 2016
Answer: 
No you need a baby sledge hammer. You put a piece of scrap wood between and the hammer and the post or just start with the scrap to get it going and switch to the real post once it's stable. Hit the scrap, if you hit the post you'll crack it.
I've found the best time to drive these things in is when the ground is damp, the more moist the better. Don't think you're going to drive these into dry clay, Read More
No you need a baby sledge hammer. You put a piece of scrap wood between and the hammer and the post or just start with the scrap to get it going and switch to the real post once it's stable. Hit the scrap, if you hit the post you'll crack it.
I've found the best time to drive these things in is when the ground is damp, the more moist the better. Don't think you're going to drive these into dry clay, there has to be some give in the soil. Once you have it started then it will work it's way down by itself.
Get a scrap piece of the 4x4 from excess cutting, or get a 2x4 scrip and tap that in. Like I said I used a baby sledge. Once it gets down a ways, then you can wiggle the scrap out. Or if you're worried about getting a scrap 4x4 stuck in it, put a short 2x4 in at the bottom, really little like an inch or two, then the scrap 4x on top and tap it down that way.
When it's going ok and getting stable then use a buggy or smaller crow bar to break out the scrap 4x4, REMEMBER TO pull the little 2x4 as well! Then tap in your real 4x4 and drive it down the rest of the way.
But remember, like I said, don't hit your real 4x4 directly, put a piece of scrap 2x4 or something between the 4x4 and the hammer and hit scrap to drive it down. If you hit the post you'll crack it. .
I've found they drive pretty easy if the ground is a least somewhat damp. If your ground is rock hard dry, then you're going to have to hack out some holes and let the hose run in it and keep watering it till the ground where you want to drive the post will give a little. Read Less
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Asked by
Bridgeville, PA.
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November 5, 2014
Answer: 
Use a sledge hammer, a rubber mallet will not work. Use a scrap piece of wood, place it were the post should be and pound it in. Then you could discard the scrap wood and install the post.
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Asked by
Shreveport, LA
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June 3, 2014
Answer: 
It works best to use a short piece of 4x4 wood, and use a sledge hammer to drive it in the ground. I do not think that a rubber mallet would work.
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Asked by
Boston, MA, USA
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May 6, 2014
Answer: 
Put a small piece of a 4x4 inside the post (you may want to trim it a little so it does not get stuck). Then use a regular sledge hammer. Go slow at first to make sure you are going in straight.
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Asked by
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February 11, 2014
Answer: 
you put a 12-18" section of 4x4 post in it to drive it in with a mall, then once it is in, remove the "sacrificial" piece and put the permanent post in with screws.
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Asked by
Phoenix, AZ, USA
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October 29, 2013
Answer: 
Cut a 4x4 piece 6.5" and insert before pounding it in (picture is a good guide). I used a 10# sledge hammer as my AZ dirt was very dense. Use a level to check its plumb every 6IN or so. I had to hammer & chisel out the 4x4 then put in a full heigth post. I drilled out more holes and used 6 lag screws total (3 sides).
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Asked by
Pleasanton, CA
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October 9, 2013
Answer: 
Jennifer,
It is recommended to use a short block to drive the E-Z Spike into the ground. Please see the flier at the following link for details: http://www.strongtie.com/ftp/fliers/F-C-EZFPP13.pdf.
Thank you!
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5 answers

Can you sledge hammer this spike into an existing rotton woodin post in concrete? Or do you have to remove the concrete?

This question is from 12-Gauge Black Powder-Coated E-Z Spike
Asked by
Denver
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April 30, 2014
I have several 4x4's that have rotted at their base and I need to replace them. I was hoping to cut the rotted 4x4 clean off at the base of the ground and then sledge hammer these spikes into the existing wood and concrete. Are these able to do that?
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Asked by
Livermore, CA
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
May 22, 2016
Answer: 
I have done this. First remove the old post. If the bottom portion is so rotted that it remains in the concrete you may have to remove it by breaking it up & removing the pieces. Otherwise, it may not be possible to pound the spike in without it twisting to the side. Buy a leveler made specifically for a post. It is magnetic & has a hinge to bend it around 2 sides of the spike. It has bubble type levels Read More
I have done this. First remove the old post. If the bottom portion is so rotted that it remains in the concrete you may have to remove it by breaking it up & removing the pieces. Otherwise, it may not be possible to pound the spike in without it twisting to the side. Buy a leveler made specifically for a post. It is magnetic & has a hinge to bend it around 2 sides of the spike. It has bubble type levels in it to ensure that the post is going in vertically from both the North-South & East-West directions. Put the magnetic leveler on the sides of the spike & put a short piece of 4 x 4 into the spike holder. Put the tip of the spike through the center of the hole in the concrete. Set it level by checking the bubble levelers on both sides of the spike. Also, ensure that the spike is not twisted so that it will allow the post to connect the horizontal 2 x 4's of the fence frame. Slowly pond the spike to allow it to stand in the ground on its on. As you continue to pound the spike into the ground, continually check that it is still level in both directions and is not twisting around either to the clockwise or counter-clockwise direction. You will probably have to often adjust the spike by manually twisting it to the proper direction. Check the position of the spike very often so that you may adjust it as it twists to one direction or the other. If you can't twist it back to the correct direction, you may have to pull it up slightly and then twist it. You must be patient in pounding the spike in as it will always tends to twist in a certain direction. So, pound it & then check it often. If you are patient and take your time, you will get the spike in so that it is straight up and not twisted. If you are not patient, you may have to pull up on the spike to get it straight & untwisted. I had to do that a couple of times. This is doable as long as you don't rush it. Read Less
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Asked by
MO
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March 9, 2016
Answer: 
Concrete/old post have to go.
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Asked by
Hockessin, DE
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September 2, 2015
Answer: 
If there is no concrete beneath the rotten wood, you should be able to pound them through. If there's a small amount of concrete underneath, you might also get them through. I would not want to pound them into a lot of concrete. I don't think they're built for that.
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Asked by
Shreveport, LA
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June 3, 2014
Answer: 
I would not think that it would work. However, there is an alternative from the same company which might be useful in your situation: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Simpson-Strong-Tie-FPBM44E-Black-Powder-Coated-12-Gauge-E-Z-Mender-FPBM44E/202563551
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Asked by
Pleasanton, CA
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May 5, 2014
Answer: 
Drew,
The E-Z Spike is not a tested/load rated product, but it is intended to be installed in soil. We would not have any information for or recommend it be installed through an exisiting wood post into concrete.
If it works for the application, you might consider the E-Z Mender: http://www.strongtie.com/products/connectors/ezfence.asp#.
Thank you!
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5 answers

I'm looking to replace a broken clotheline post? and am wondering if this will hold up to a short clotheline. About 15 feet apart

This question is from 12-Gauge Black Powder-Coated E-Z Spike
Asked by
harrythehat58
Nanticoke, PA
September 26, 2012
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Asked by
Livermore, CA
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May 23, 2016
Answer: 
Yes.
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Asked by
MO
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March 9, 2016
Answer: 
I used it to hold up a 4 rail wood fence, and it's been fine, so I think it will, but be careful to get it plumb. The spike is long so it's stable once it's pounded all the way in.
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Asked by
Hockessin, DE
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September 2, 2015
Answer: 
Should do the trick. These spikes go deep.
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Asked by
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February 11, 2014
Answer: 
Yes, this will work well
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Asked by
Pleasanton, CA
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September 27, 2012
Answer: 
harrythehat58,
The E-Z Spike can be used in a variety of applications where quick-to-install posts are needed. This product is not load rated therefore it would be up to the Designer to determine the suitability of this product for the specific application.
Thank you!
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5 answers

Using EZ Spike for moving fence

This question is from 12-Gauge Black Powder-Coated E-Z Spike
Asked by
kaym
New Mexico
January 23, 2012
I currently have a wood panel fence, 8ft x 6ft wooden panels, that are attached to 4x4 posts, cemented to the ground. I have to move the fence, but have no means to dig up the existing posts. Would it work if I removed the fence panels, sawed off the existing 4x4 posts at ground level, then relocated them to the new location and reinstall using the EZ spikes? I am trying to keep from buying new posts and thought this would work, and wouldn't require any digging at either location old or new.
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Asked by
MO
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March 9, 2016
Answer: 
I used it to prototype a 4 ft high wood fence and it worked great. The spike goes quite deep, so pounding it in is a trick in terms of keeping it plumb and your soil has to be wet. Don't think you can pound this into clay in the middle of the summer is the only warning I can think of.
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Asked by
Chicago IL
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August 2, 2014
Answer: 
Use a shovel and dig the old ones out
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Asked by
Shreveport, LA
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June 3, 2014
Answer: 
I don't see why this wouldn't work.
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Asked by
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February 11, 2014
Answer: 
Yes, this would work fine.
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Asked by
Pleasanton, CA
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January 25, 2012
Answer: 
kaym,
The E-Z fence post products are not tested/load rated; it would be up to the Designer to determine if they are adequate for the specific fence application. Please see the following link for further information: http://www.strongtie.com/products/connectors/ezfence.asp.
Thank you!
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Customer Reviews

Rated 4.6 out of 5 by 49 reviewers.
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Works great The post that a hose reel was at attached to broke off at the concrete. I couldn't get the remainder of the post out. And a better spot for the hose reel was over in a little dirt area. I used a scrap one-foot long 4x4 and a small sledge hammer. I'm a female over fifty. I pounded and pounded and slowly got it in. It works great. September 6, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Strong and sturdy Works as expected. Next time car will knock down my mailbox and my mailbox post will give some damage to the car. August 23, 2016
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Birdbath base Birdbath in middle of our flower bed is a 4x4 wood post w/ birdbath mounted to top. Originally I had screwed the 4x4 into a tree stump, but once the stump rotted away, I needed a new solution. I didn't want to dig and pour concrete b/c of the roots. This E-Z Spike worked. It's a tough job to pound this spike into the ground with a sledge hammer, but certainly doable -- just take your time, every hit gets you closer. Getting it level is more of a chore b/c once you drive it to a certain depth and it's off center, you can't easily bring it back. Also, be sure to use a scrap 4x4 or two 2x4's in the Spike in order to strike these when pounding into the ground. You will destroy this piece of wood in the process and may have to use a regular hammer to knock it loose so you can remove it (prior to inserting your 4x4 post). May 24, 2016
Rated 2.0 out of 5.0 by Poor design, look for another product The "box" end that is meant to hold the 4x4 was too small and I had to trim down my lumber to fit. Also, on many of these, the box end was not co-linear with the spike. i.e. I could pound the spike in vertically, but the lumber would be at an angle. April 27, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Should have found this years ago... I wanted to put up a bird feeder near a hedge line, this spike allowed me to install a post in a matter of minutes, without it I would have had to dig and cut out roots, hard work and potential damage overted. July 21, 2015
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by E Z Spike excellent sturdy product and easy to use. I would recommend this product. April 5, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by E-Z Spike - it is easy to install The spike works as you'd expect, put a short 4x4 block in it. I used a 22lb sledge hammer. If you hit a rock then you have issues, but that's not the spike's doing that's life. Keeping it going straight is tricky because of course you're driving it with a blunt instrument, so I found moving around it helped keep it plumb, but it took a few tries to get it right. So the concept works great. Home Depot had the lowest price I found, even when I checked EBay, so I'm happy with the result. We may eventually take sona tubes and pour footings, but if we do, I'll just pull and reuse the spikes in the concrete. Only other comment I can make is, if you have clay soil make sure it's spring when you do this as these spikes go down a LONG way and pounding will get tough if the clay is not wet! March 9, 2016
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Did the job We used 2 of these to put up a gate. They were a bit of a pain to get it but they did the job! They wanted to twist when we hammered them in. They are a 2 person job. April 19, 2016
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