0095076512892

Steves & Sons

Model Q64O8NNNAC99

Internet #203500932

36 in. x 80 in. 2-Panel Arch Solid Core Oak Interior Door Slab

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Product Overview

Experience the warmth and beauty of wood with this red oak 2 panel Arch interior door slab. Door is constructed with quality oak veneer over durable LVL core with stile and rail construction. Slab is built to pre-fit size for easy change-out of existing doors.

California residents: see   Proposition 65 information

  • Engineered stile and rail construction prevents doors from warping or splitting
  • Unfinished red oak is ready to stain or paint in a color to match you homes decor
  • Reversible handing allow for flexible installation in existing openings
  • Actual door size is 1-3/8 in. x 35-7/8 in. x 80 in.

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Customer Questions & Answers

36 in. x 80 in. 2-Panel Arch Solid Core Oak Interior Door Slab
36 in. x 80 in. 2-Panel Arch Solid Core Oak Interior Door Slab

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This question is from 36 in. x 80 in. 2-Panel Arch Solid Core Oak Interior Door Slab
 
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I need approximately 78 inch doors. I guess they are not avilable. How do you suggest i cut them?

This question is from 36 in. x 80 in. 2-Panel Arch Solid Core Oak Interior Door Slab
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Fort washington, pa
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February 1, 2015
catalog # 203500928
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Asked by
pa
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June 12, 2015
Answer: 
Mike, it kind of depends on the door. Most of the time they are built to have some inches taken off the bottom. If it is a hollow core door you need to determine if the bottom in solid beyond the amount you need to take off. You don't want to cut it and have this hollow space in the middle.
Manufacture should have specs. If not you could try tapping it with a tool and listen to the changes in
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Mike, it kind of depends on the door. Most of the time they are built to have some inches taken off the bottom. If it is a hollow core door you need to determine if the bottom in solid beyond the amount you need to take off. You don't want to cut it and have this hollow space in the middle.
Manufacture should have specs. If not you could try tapping it with a tool and listen to the changes in noise.
Plenty of advise online on how to make the cut. Here is how I do it.
I put a piece of masking tape or painters tape over the line where I am going to cut. I also you a razor blade to score on the line where the saw will cut (that scoring should be on the edge of the curf towards the door, not the discarded trim piece) I make this scoring on the two edges and face where your saw will be sliding across. You don't really need the scoring on the bottom as the circular saw blade is cutting towards the wood.
You do all this, because a circular saw cuts up towards the saw and it may very well chip out the wood on the outside of the door leaving a chipped up edge.
Use a piece of wood clamped to the door to guide your circular saw for a straight cut.
Here is one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMeACLrOtVs
I usually look at several online before jumping into something new. He scored it on all sides which is fine. A straight edge to guide your saw will make a difference.
This guy has an excellent guide. But I would still score the door on top and edges.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3pQplY3qIA
You can just use a straight edge clamped to the door. But you must know the distance between the side cut of the saw blade and the edge of the saw that will slide against the guide. This distance lets you know where to clamp your straight edge. For example I clamp my straight edge 5 3/16 inches away from where my cut will be made. Best way to measure this distance is to use a scrap piece of wood clamp a board 90 degrees to it and start a cut. Just measure from clamped board to edge of cut.
Good luck! Read Less
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February 5, 2015
Answer: 
We would suggest you trim equal amounts of the top and bottom of the unit, and make sure to finish the cut ends to protect the door.
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Customer Reviews

Rated 3.0 out of 5 by 2 reviewers.
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Very nice door! These oak doors are very well made. The grain of the oak is beautifully matched, and all cuts are extremely sharp and precise. They require virtually no sanding. I wish they had a pre-hung version, but for the price it's worth it to make your own doorjambs. July 8, 2016
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by disapointed wish I knew I was getting a product from China I know better now to read my labels and information sections better a chunk knock in the inner edge of the door and outside edge splintered March 24, 2016
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