0041343001477

Super TUFF-R

Model 268426

Internet #100322374

Store SKU #804395

Store SO SKU #621947

1 in. x 4 ft. x 8 ft. R-6.5 Insulating Sheathing

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Product Overview

The Super TUFF-R R-6.5 1 in. x 4 ft. x 8 ft. Foam Insulation features radiant barrier-quality aluminum-foil facers on both sides for durability and is ENERGY STAR compliant for savings. It is lightweight and installs easily. On TUFF-R insulation, one facer is a continuous sheet of aluminum foil; the other is a Tri-Plex facer consisting of a three-ply laminate of durable kraft with aluminum foil on both sides.

  • 4 ft. x 8 ft. coverage area
  • R-6.5
  • Energy Star qualified to meet or exceed federal guidelines for energy efficiency for year-round energy and money savings
  • Radiant barrier-quality aluminum-foil facers on both sides (1-side reinforced) for durability
  • Moisture-resistant facers
  • High-performance polyisocyanurate foam core for excellent energy efficiency
  • Lightweight design installs easily over OSB or non-insulated sheathing and directly over wood studs
  • How much do you need? Let our calculator help:
    Insulation calculator button

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Customer Questions & Answers

1 in. x 4 ft. x 8 ft. R-6.5 Insulating Sheathing
1 in. x 4 ft. x 8 ft. R-6.5 Insulating Sheathing

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This question is from 1 in. x 4 ft. x 8 ft. R-6.5 Insulating Sheathing
 
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Work in Garage for exposed concrete block wall?

This question is from 1 in. x 4 ft. x 8 ft. R-6.5 Insulating Sheathing
Asked by
Pennsylvania
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January 4, 2016
I have a basement garage on the 2nd level that has the outside facing wall that's just the exposed concrete block. Would this would to go over concrete blocks? So far I've used waterproof masonry paint and sealed the bottom as it means the concrete slab flooring. My idea is to use rigid foam insulation and the drywall over it if possible.

Any insight would be appreciated.

Thanks!
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Asked by
Massachusetts
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
July 27, 2016
Answer: 
Dear Stephen: Foam board is the best solution for your garage, with >R5 per inch. A couple of tips:

(1) Seal all of the edges and joints to block air leaks. DAP 230 works well for small gaps. Use the 'Windows and Doors' version of Great Stuff for larger gaps.
(2) Foam board is very flammable and MUST be covered by 1/2" drywall in any garage, living space, basement, storage area, etc. To boost the Read More
Dear Stephen: Foam board is the best solution for your garage, with >R5 per inch. A couple of tips:

(1) Seal all of the edges and joints to block air leaks. DAP 230 works well for small gaps. Use the 'Windows and Doors' version of Great Stuff for larger gaps.
(2) Foam board is very flammable and MUST be covered by 1/2" drywall in any garage, living space, basement, storage area, etc. To boost the total R value, fill your stud bays with Roxul ComfortBatt, which provides R4 per inch. See: Roxul Model # RXCB351525, Home Depot Internet # 202090820 Store SKU # 974419

I hope this is helpful.

Mark
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January 5, 2016
Answer: 
Hello Steve,
Yes that is a good application for this product .It will provide an insulation rating of R-6.5.
Left click on the photo of the product you are interested in at Home Depot.com. Then detailed installation instructions and product specifications can be found by clicking on the orange arrow beside the word “specification” which is below the photo of this product on Home Depot.com. You will Read More
Hello Steve,
Yes that is a good application for this product .It will provide an insulation rating of R-6.5.
Left click on the photo of the product you are interested in at Home Depot.com. Then detailed installation instructions and product specifications can be found by clicking on the orange arrow beside the word “specification” which is below the photo of this product on Home Depot.com. You will find an installation and user guide in a box to the right. Read this over carefully to see if this is right for you.
Thank you for your inquiry.
Charlotte from The Home Depot How To Community. Read Less
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This question is from 1 in. x 4 ft. x 8 ft. R-6.5 Insulating Sheathing
 
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Is this product too rigid for shaping to an arched ceiling?

This question is from 1 in. x 4 ft. x 8 ft. R-6.5 Insulating Sheathing
Asked by
Colorado
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August 1, 2015
My garage has an arched ceiling with a very gentle pitch. I'm hoping it's possible to make a couple relief cuts on the non-reinforced foil side of this board to make it conform to my ceiling. This is not available at my local store, so I'm unable to look at the product. Any help or info is appreciated. Thanks!
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Asked by
Massachusetts
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
August 30, 2015
Answer: 
Hello again: I forgot to include the details for 1/4" XPS from Home Depot, which bends easily and would probably be the best option for your curved ceiling. Look for:
FOAMULAR 1/4 in. x 4 ft. x 50 ft. R-1 Fanfold Insulation Sheathing
Owens Corning Model # 10UM Internet # 100320301 Store SKU # 409692
As noted in the description, this thin insulation comes in a fan-folded stack. A photo is attached. You Read More
Hello again: I forgot to include the details for 1/4" XPS from Home Depot, which bends easily and would probably be the best option for your curved ceiling. Look for:
FOAMULAR 1/4 in. x 4 ft. x 50 ft. R-1 Fanfold Insulation Sheathing
Owens Corning Model # 10UM Internet # 100320301 Store SKU # 409692
As noted in the description, this thin insulation comes in a fan-folded stack. A photo is attached. You could simply apply multiple layers to create the thickness and R value you want. XPS has an R value of 5 per inch.
I hope this is helpful.
Mark Read Less
User submitted photo
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Asked by
Massachusetts
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
August 29, 2015
Answer: 
Hello: Yes, you can 'curve' foam board with relief cuts, as you described. This will not create a smooth curve with Tuff-R, however; the board will fracture along the line of each relief cut, creating a 'blocky' surface. You will need to make many cuts to conform closely to the curve.
Another option would be to use 1/4" or 1/2" XPS, which does not have aluminum facing and can bend slightly to follow a Read More
Hello: Yes, you can 'curve' foam board with relief cuts, as you described. This will not create a smooth curve with Tuff-R, however; the board will fracture along the line of each relief cut, creating a 'blocky' surface. You will need to make many cuts to conform closely to the curve.
Another option would be to use 1/4" or 1/2" XPS, which does not have aluminum facing and can bend slightly to follow a gentle curve.
With either option, this should not be a problem, because the foam board must be covered by an ignition barrier in occupied space, e.g. 1/2" sheet rock, which can bend. So even if the surface of the foam board isn't smooth, the dry wall should be. Use long screws to fasten the wall board through the foam board.
I hope this is helpful,
Mark Read Less
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This question is from 1 in. x 4 ft. x 8 ft. R-6.5 Insulating Sheathing
 
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thinking about using this in the attic floor, under the fiberglass

This question is from 1 in. x 4 ft. x 8 ft. R-6.5 Insulating Sheathing
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August 23, 2016
My attic (used for storage) floor has R-19 fiberglass bat and not sealed. I am thinking of up the R value to R-38, without increasing the depth of the floor. It looks like I can put 3 inches of this tuff-r boards to get about R-19, plus the original R-19, to be close to R-38 that I wanted.

I am thinking of putting 3 layers of tuff-r boards (cutting them to size 1"x15"x96" to fit between studs) down first, than putting the original R-19 fiberglass bats on top, then close it with particle boards for storage.

Did you see anything wrong? Am I violating the building code in any way? (Boston area). Am I creating a fire hazard?

thank you,
cy
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Asked by
Boston, MA
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
August 24, 2016
Answer: 
Dear Cy: Thanks for the details and good questions. A few comments:

(1) Foam board as the bottom layer: This is a good plan, with a few caveats noted below. Tuff-R polyisocyanate foam board provides R6 per inch -- very effective insulation. Adding 3" would boost your total ceiling / attic insulation to roughly R38. If you check the DOE Energy Star tables, however, the recommended level of attic
Read More
Dear Cy: Thanks for the details and good questions. A few comments:

(1) Foam board as the bottom layer: This is a good plan, with a few caveats noted below. Tuff-R polyisocyanate foam board provides R6 per inch -- very effective insulation. Adding 3" would boost your total ceiling / attic insulation to roughly R38. If you check the DOE Energy Star tables, however, the recommended level of attic insulation in Massachusetts is R49 to R60. If you installed two layers of 1 7/8" Tuff-R, you would add R24.4 -- for a total of R48. This would be a smart move, plus only two layers to cut and install instead of three.

(2) Fire safety: Foam board is flammable, emits toxic gases when it burns, and MUST be covered by an approved 'thermal barrer' in any living space, basement, garage or storage space -- like your attic. The standard in code is 1/2" drywall. So talk to your town's building inspector and see if they will approve the layer of fiberglass insulation covered with particle board as a 'thermal barrier'. This is referred to as an "“alternate assembly”, which local building officials can approve. (And they should; a thick layer of fiberglass insulation covered with particle board or plywood is more fire resistant than 1/2" drywall.) Why ask for their approval first? If a fire occurs, your insurance company might refuse to cover the damage if an "unapproved" solution was installed by you. If you sell the home, the realtor or buyer may also ask for a copy of the permit. Another suggestion: use 1/2" or 3/4" plywood instead of particle board; plywood s referenced in the IRC and will be more credible with your inspector. Finally, I assume the ceiling below is 1/2" drywall. Also note how you will air seal all recessed lights, etc. (see below) to block flames from easily passing through the ceiling to ignite the foam board.

(3) Air sealing: Before you install any foam board, start by carefully sealing every air leak into your attic. This is almost as important as insulation and R value. Typical culprits include recessed lights, the gaps around vent pipes, the gap around an interior chimney, etc. Home Depot sells Tenmat covers for recessed lights. See: Tenmat Model FF130E, Home Depot Internet #204286308 Store SKU #1000012747. Use DAP 230 to air seal the edges. Great Stuff foam is good for gaps around cold vent pipes -- but DO NOT use it next to anything that gets hot, e.g. recessed lights, a furnace vent or a chimney; Great Stuff will ignite at just 240 degrees F. For hot vent pipes, pack the gap with Roxul rock wool, then apply a top coat of fire resistant sealant, e.g. 3M Model CP-25WB+, Home Depot Internet #100166701 Store SKU #163096. If you have an interior chimney, block the gap with aluminum flashing and seal all of the edges and joints with the same 3M fire resistant sealant.

(4) Air seal your foam board: The same thing applies to your foam board -- seal all of the edges and joints to block air leaks. Great Stuff foam works well for larger gaps; this will also allow you to cut the foam board a bit loose and not worry about a tight fit. DAP 230 is good for smaller spaces. Make sure the junctions around recessed light covers and vent pipes are also sealed. The goal is to turn the layer of foam board into a tight air seal across your attic.

I hope all of this detail is helpful. The devil is in the proverbial details with insulation.

Mark
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Can this be installed over 1" dow board that is glued to the inside of a block wall ?

This question is from 1 in. x 4 ft. x 8 ft. R-6.5 Insulating Sheathing
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July 12, 2016
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Asked by
Massachusetts
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
July 14, 2016
Answer: 
Dear Hawker: Yes, this would be an excellent insulation upgrade for your block wall. One caveat, however: foam board is flammable and emits toxic gas when it burns. It MUST be covered by an approved thermal barrier in any occupied space, basement, garage, storage area, etc. The standard is 1'2" drywall. If you plan to build a standard 2x4 interior wall in front of your block wall, faced with drywall, Read More
Dear Hawker: Yes, this would be an excellent insulation upgrade for your block wall. One caveat, however: foam board is flammable and emits toxic gas when it burns. It MUST be covered by an approved thermal barrier in any occupied space, basement, garage, storage area, etc. The standard is 1'2" drywall. If you plan to build a standard 2x4 interior wall in front of your block wall, faced with drywall, then there will be no problem.

Also make sure you seal all of the edges and joints carefully, to block air infiltration. DAP 230 sealant works well. For large gaps, the 'Windows and Doors' version of Great Stuff spray foam is a good solution. (But cannot be installed near any source of heat.)

I hope this is helpful,

Mark
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Customer Reviews

Rated 5.0 out of 5 by 1 reviewer.
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Good tuff- product This board is well made. I use it on older homes. High R-value by thickness ratio, 6.5 R for the 1" board. Installs easily and the foil facing adds to its durability if there is any delay between installation and siding of the building. October 22, 2010
  • 2016-09-08 T12:52:38.194-05:00
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