0021038383811

Toro

Model 38381

Internet #202218973

Store SKU #634864

Store SO SKU #634864

Power Curve 18 in. Electric Snow Blower

$249.00 /each
  • 15 Amp motor with 18 in. clearing width
  • Throws snow up to 30 ft.
  • Power Curve technology cleans down to the pavement

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Product Overview

The Toro 1800 Power Curve 18 in. Electric Snow Blower is designed to move snow quickly and clean all the way down to patios, decks and driveways while helping to eliminate clogging. The snow blower's zip deflector provides a choice between high, low and in-between snow throwing while its 160-degree chute helps you direct the snow discharge in many directions. This model features an ergonomically-designed handle for a comfortable grip during use.

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  • 15-Amp electric motor offers powerful snow-clearing action
  • 18 in. clearance width and 12 in. intake height make quick work of clearing areas
  • Power curve technology cleans down to the surface and helps prevent clogging
  • Zip deflector provides high, low and in-between snow blowing
  • Positive-locking ratchet deflector adjusts with a touch of your hand
  • Cord-lock system helps to ensure that the cord is locked in for reliable operation
  • 160-degree chute rotation for optimal snow-blowing control
  • Starts with a key, interlock button and power-control bar for your convenience
  • 6 in. tires provide maneuverability
  • Ergonomic handle design offers comfortable, easy operation
  • Lift handle for transportation of the unit
  • Compact design conserves valuable storage space
  • Quick lever lets you aim snow while you're moving



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Customer Questions & Answers

24 Questions171 Answers

Customer Questions & Answers

Power Curve 18 in. Electric Snow Blower
Power Curve 18 in. Electric Snow Blower

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This question is from Power Curve 18 in. Electric Snow Blower
 
12 answers

As a 15 amp appliance can it be plugged into a 110 outlet?

This question is from Power Curve 18 in. Electric Snow Blower
Asked by
Boston
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February 14, 2014
I have an outside outlet that supplies 110 volts and I want to know if it can be operated on this outlet.
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Answers (12)

Asked by
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February 27, 2014
Answer: 
Yes, it can be plugged into a 110 outlet.
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Asked by
Northwest Ohio
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February 22, 2014
Answer: 
Yes, it uses 110 volt and draws 15 amps current.
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Asked by
Star, ID
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February 21, 2014
Answer: 
I'm sure it will be fine as long as you don't overload the motor by trying to do too much, ie: fairly deep snow, (over 6 or 8 inches). Most outlets typically are rated at 15 amps. My garage outlets are rated at 20 amps. Yours maybe as well depending on the age of the house. Maybe a call to a local electrical contractor would be helpful.
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Asked by
Worthington, OH
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February 18, 2014
Answer: 
I operate my Toro snow blower from my 110 volt outlet inside the garage. Works great!
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Asked by
Lafayette, IN, USA
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February 18, 2014
Answer: 
Yes, this Snow Blower plugs into a standard 110 outlet.
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Asked by
Rochester, NY
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February 17, 2014
Answer: 
Assuming your house was built after WW2, yes, you can plug it in to your outside outlet. If there is any other large device using that AC line, you might trip the breaker. I would not hesitate to try it but would avoid running the dishwasher, clothes washer or any other device that might be on the ground fault line which should be what your outside socket is attached to.
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Asked by
Chicago, IL, USA
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February 17, 2014
Answer: 
No problem, that's 15 . Just about all home appliances are for 110 volts. Only if you have some kind of industrial machine will 110 not work. The line that you are plugged into has has have at least a 15 amp fuse or circuit breaker.
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Asked by
Malvern, PA
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February 17, 2014
Answer: 
My grandfather was an electrician, but he died before I was born, so my credentials are a bit thin, but here goes: Virtually all appliances, except for a high-draw appliance like an electric clothes dryer, plug into a regular 110 V outlet. The question is, rather, about the current draw. This motor draws 15A, which is the magnitude of most household circuit breakers. Some circuits (like the kitchen) Read More
My grandfather was an electrician, but he died before I was born, so my credentials are a bit thin, but here goes: Virtually all appliances, except for a high-draw appliance like an electric clothes dryer, plug into a regular 110 V outlet. The question is, rather, about the current draw. This motor draws 15A, which is the magnitude of most household circuit breakers. Some circuits (like the kitchen) often have heavier wire (e.g., 12 gauge) and use a 20 amp circuit breaker to handle the extra current draw. That said, I plugged my snow blower into a regular outlet in my garage and have had no problems, even with the motor straining to handle wet snow. The worst that should happen would be to blow the circuit breaker, which would need to be reset on the panel. If that happened, then I would resort to an electrician. You could put a 20 amp circuit breaker but unless the wiring was heavy enough (e.g., not 16 gauge, this would surely violate building codes. However, as I said, mine is plugged into a conventional 15A (breaker) circuit and I have experienced no problems. Anyone else have thoughts? Read Less
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Asked by
Northwest Ohio
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February 17, 2014
Answer: 
Absolutely! The only concession I made to the electrical power situation was to buy an extension cord rated for 15 amps, which was kind of expensive but I wanted to be comfortable with it. I have had it for about 6-weeks and it works fine. My grandson and his friend have a big gas-powered snow blower. They stopped by after a heavy snow and offered to clear our driveway but their big machine was down some Read More
Absolutely! The only concession I made to the electrical power situation was to buy an extension cord rated for 15 amps, which was kind of expensive but I wanted to be comfortable with it. I have had it for about 6-weeks and it works fine. My grandson and his friend have a big gas-powered snow blower. They stopped by after a heavy snow and offered to clear our driveway but their big machine was down some reason. They use ours and said they were surprised how well it worked. They said it was really great. Read Less
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Asked by
St. Louis, MO, USA
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February 17, 2014
Answer: 
Yes, you shouldn't have any problem using any typical 110 volt outlet. However, there is a possibility that if the circuit feeding the outlet is protected by only a 15 amp breaker or fuse, which will be rated at 80% of that capacity, or 12 amps, that may cause the breaker to trip or the fuse to blow. If anything else is on the same circuit as that outlet, make sure it is not on at the same time. If you Read More
Yes, you shouldn't have any problem using any typical 110 volt outlet. However, there is a possibility that if the circuit feeding the outlet is protected by only a 15 amp breaker or fuse, which will be rated at 80% of that capacity, or 12 amps, that may cause the breaker to trip or the fuse to blow. If anything else is on the same circuit as that outlet, make sure it is not on at the same time. If you still have a problem, you may try upgrading that circuit to a 20 amp breaker or fuse IF your panel has the capacity to do so. Read Less
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Asked by
North Shore MA
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February 17, 2014
Answer: 
Yes but make sure to use an outdoor rated extension cord with appropriate amp...ask at the store, they can get you set up.
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Asked by
Rochester, NY, USA
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February 17, 2014
Answer: 
I plug mine into my regular outdoor plug. Never had a problem.
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This question is from Power Curve 18 in. Electric Snow Blower
 
12 answers

Why can't I use a combined extension cord of 150 feet with this snow blower?

This question is from Power Curve 18 in. Electric Snow Blower
Asked by
NY
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January 2, 2014
I noticed one of the comments in the Q&A that said you can't.
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Answers (12)

Asked by
Taylorsville, Utah
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January 5, 2016
Answer: 
The reason has to do with increased resistance in the cord, the higher the gauge the higher the resistance, the longer the cord the higher the resistance. The motor requires 110V to run properly. As more amperage or current is drawn through the cord, the greater the voltage drop across the cord. To reduce the voltage drop you can increase the size of the cord(smaller gauge) or shorten it. Home circuits Read More
The reason has to do with increased resistance in the cord, the higher the gauge the higher the resistance, the longer the cord the higher the resistance. The motor requires 110V to run properly. As more amperage or current is drawn through the cord, the greater the voltage drop across the cord. To reduce the voltage drop you can increase the size of the cord(smaller gauge) or shorten it. Home circuits are usually 15 amps or 20 amps. The unit is limited to 15 amps so that it can work in all homes regardless which circuit it is used in. The power of the motor is voltage * amperage, so dropping the voltage drops the power of the snow blower. Read Less
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Asked by
Chicago, IL, USA
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January 28, 2014
Answer: 
It will still work but has less power because of the longer extension.
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Asked by
Lafayette, IN, USA
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January 23, 2014
Answer: 
Its all about safety. The longer cord will generate more heat increasing the chances for electrical shock, especially at the connection. It also reduces the current your blower can draw and potentially damaging the blower motor.
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Asked by
Rochester, NY
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January 23, 2014
Answer: 
The recommended 12 gauge extension cord is rated at 20 amps. As the length of the cord increases, so does the resistance and consequently the amount of current it can support is reduced. The motor is rated at 15 amps so if it is drawing maximum and the cord is adding a load due to its length, you might trip a 15 amp wall circuit .breaker. If you have a 20 circuit on the wall, you could add another Read More
The recommended 12 gauge extension cord is rated at 20 amps. As the length of the cord increases, so does the resistance and consequently the amount of current it can support is reduced. The motor is rated at 15 amps so if it is drawing maximum and the cord is adding a load due to its length, you might trip a 15 amp wall circuit .breaker. If you have a 20 circuit on the wall, you could add another (short) extension. I would minimize its length to what is absolutely necessary. If you have a 15 amp breaker, I would be reluctant to add another extension. If your house has old wiring or reduced capacity, all bets are off. Also, if at any time your cord get warm, stop using the blower. You are over loading the extensions rating. I use a 150 foot 12 gauge extension and have no issues on a 15 amp circuit. Read Less
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Asked by
Chicago
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January 14, 2014
Answer: 
It's characteristic of the electrical cord and the amount of amperage required by the device. The more amps, the more distance, the thicker the cord. I don't think they make cords thick enough that will work over more than 100 feet.
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Asked by
North Shore MA
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January 12, 2014
Answer: 
The Power Curve is powered 15 Amp motor. Amperage declines substantially beyond 100' even with rated 14 or even 12 gauge cord. From the table below you'll see a 14 gauge cord supports up to 16 Amps but errodes to only 5 Amps at 100'. So I use 12 gauge 100" and do connect a 12 gauge 50' for my front walk. The motor simply loses power. Also make sure to use an outdoor rated cord. Non-outdoor rated cords Read More
The Power Curve is powered 15 Amp motor. Amperage declines substantially beyond 100' even with rated 14 or even 12 gauge cord. From the table below you'll see a 14 gauge cord supports up to 16 Amps but errodes to only 5 Amps at 100'. So I use 12 gauge 100" and do connect a 12 gauge 50' for my front walk. The motor simply loses power. Also make sure to use an outdoor rated cord. Non-outdoor rated cords loose power in the cold. When I connect 50' cord to 100' cord I wrap with duck tape to avoid snow/wet getting into the connection and possibly shorting out the motor.
Current limits on extension cords (AMPS)
Cord size 25 ft. 50 ft. 100 ft.
18-Gauge 7 amps 5 amps 2 amps
16-Gauge 12 amps 7 amps 3.4 amps
14-Gauge 16 amps 12 amps 5 amps
12-Gauge 20 amps 16 amps 7 amps
Read Less
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January 12, 2014
Answer: 
The Power Curve is powered 15 Amp motor. Amperage declines substantially beyond 100' even with rated 14 or even 12 gauge cord. From the table below you'll see a 14 gauge cord supports up to 16 Amps but errodes to only 5 Amps at 100'. I do connect a 50' for my front walk, but the stress on the electric motor due to lack of power would be too much for extended use beyond 100'. The motor simply loses all Read More
The Power Curve is powered 15 Amp motor. Amperage declines substantially beyond 100' even with rated 14 or even 12 gauge cord. From the table below you'll see a 14 gauge cord supports up to 16 Amps but errodes to only 5 Amps at 100'. I do connect a 50' for my front walk, but the stress on the electric motor due to lack of power would be too much for extended use beyond 100'. The motor simply loses all power. Also make sure to use an outdoor rated cord. Non-outdoor rated cords loose power in the cold. When I connect 50' cord to 100' cord I wrap with duck tape to avoid snow/wet getting into the connection and possibly shorting out the motor.
Current limits on extension cords (AMPS)
Cord size 25 ft. 50 ft. 100 ft.
18-Gauge 7 amp 5 amps 2 amps
16-Gauge 12 amps 7 amps 3.4 amps
14-Gauge 16 amps 12 amps 5 amps
12-Gauge 20 amps 16 amps 7 amps
Hope this helps...btw - I'm a girl! Read Less
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Asked by
ralphcop116
New Jersey
January 11, 2014
Answer: 
Using two cords may cause the motor to overheat and you need to use a heavy duty cord as instructions state.
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Asked by
St. Louis, MO, USA
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January 10, 2014
Answer: 
The longer the cord, the more voltage drop (loss) you'll get. The low voltage will not only harm the motor, but you'll lose power and could burn out the motor.
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Asked by
Brackney, PA 18812, USA
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January 10, 2014
Answer: 
Amperage drop. The longer the extension cord, the more amperage drop that occurs and that can damage the electric motor.
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Asked by
North Andover
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January 10, 2014
Answer: 
You can. The instructions say 14 AWG up to 100' and 12 AWG up to 150'. I went with 12 AWG for 100', because low voltage can damage AC induction motors over time -- it causes them to run with higher current, higher resistance loss, and thus greater heat.
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January 9, 2014
Answer: 
There will be a performance impact if you combine extension cords.
Please view the Operator's Manual for additional information. You can view the manual online at http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdfImages/e4/e4d89f8d-b82f-4a09-accf-ffd60275ead9.pdf.
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This question is from Power Curve 18 in. Electric Snow Blower
 
12 answers

What is the weight of this snow blower?

This question is from Power Curve 18 in. Electric Snow Blower
Asked by
Parma, OH
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November 6, 2013
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Answers (12)

February 12, 2014
Answer: 
25 lbs. but it is easy to move.
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Asked by
Rochester, NY, USA
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February 11, 2014
Answer: 
I am a 68 yr. Woman. I can pick it up easily and swing it around to a different direction.
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Asked by
Lafayette, IN, USA
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January 23, 2014
Answer: 
25 lbs.
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Asked by
Portsmouth, RI, USA
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January 22, 2014
Answer: 
The specification sheet says 25 pounds weight and I believe it is correct. Very light and easy to lift and slide into snow.
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Asked by
Mid-Hudson Valley, New York
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January 21, 2014
Answer: 
Well, let me put it this way: It's light enough for a 64 year-old woman to carry up 10 steps to get it on to my deck ;-)
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Asked by
Chicago
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January 14, 2014
Answer: 
I'd guess about 10-15 pounds. You can lift it with one hand
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Asked by
ralphcop116
New Jersey
January 11, 2014
Answer: 
About 30 lbs , light enough to hang it on my garage wall to store it
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Asked by
Brackney, PA 18812, USA
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January 10, 2014
Answer: 
26 pounds! I'm 56, overweight, out of shape, and I can easily carry it anywhere I need to go!
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Asked by
Phildelphia, PA
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January 2, 2014
Answer: 
It's not that heavy, it's light weight as a matter of fact. i forget the weight but it's listed in the specs and on the box. Check it out on Toro's wbe site.
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Asked by
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December 18, 2013
Answer: 
it is very light. I would guess in the 15-20lb range.
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Asked by
Rochester, NY
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December 7, 2013
Answer: 
The 18 In. Electric Power Curve Snow Blower weighs only 25 pounds.
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November 6, 2013
Answer: 
The 18 in. Power Curve weighs 25 lbs.
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This question is from Power Curve 18 in. Electric Snow Blower
 
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How far will this snow blower throw the snow?

This question is from Power Curve 18 in. Electric Snow Blower
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Mn
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October 27, 2013
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Asked by
Northwest Ohio
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February 22, 2014
Answer: 
I would guess at least 15' maybe more...
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Asked by
Star, ID
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February 21, 2014
Answer: 
Depending on the thrower hood angle and the heaviness (water content) of the snow fall, mine was discharging a fairly light snow fall about 5 or 6 feet. The hood angle can be adjusted to throw farther or higher.
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Asked by
Rochester, NY, USA
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February 11, 2014
Answer: 
Throw is adjustable so when the shoot is tipped back all the way it will throw the snow at least 10 feet.
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Asked by
Chicago, IL, USA
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January 28, 2014
Answer: 
It depends on the "wetness" of the snow. Maximum distance I have been getting with normal-to -light snow is about 20 feet. But if it's in slush, it doesn't go but a few feet.
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Asked by
Lafayette, IN, USA
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January 23, 2014
Answer: 
That depends on the chute angle you have it set at and if it is a heavy wet snow or a dry fluffy snow. But, in either case it can blow the snow the full width of a standard single car driveway which is about 9 ft.
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Asked by
Rochester, NY
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January 23, 2014
Answer: 
It depends on the snow. Light show will shoot around 15+ feet or so. Heavier snow less.
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Asked by
Mid-Hudson Valley, New York
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January 21, 2014
Answer: 
I'm guestimating it will throw snow about 12-15 feet! That was my experience with light fluffy snow. Haven't yet had the opportunity to use it on heavier, wet snow.
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Asked by
ralphcop116
New Jersey
January 11, 2014
Answer: 
About 25 feet
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Asked by
St. Louis, MO, USA
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January 10, 2014
Answer: 
Depends on whether its a wet, heavy snow or a dry, light snow, but it can easily throw it 20-30'.
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Asked by
Phildelphia, PA
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January 2, 2014
Answer: 
Appx. 3 to 5 feet give or take. You have to adjust the angle ot the thrower, it does a pretty goog job!
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Asked by
Rochester, NY
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December 7, 2013
Answer: 
I thought it threw the snow quite far. I think four or five feet.
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Asked by
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October 28, 2013
Answer: 
The 18 inch Power Curve Snowblower has an 18" (45.7 cm) clearing width and up to 30' (9 m) throw distance.
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Customer Reviews

Rated 4.3 out of 5 by 514 reviewers.
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Handy in a storm I prefer electric appliances because they are always ready to go, need no maintenance and pollute less. In the recent storm I was up and running while our neighbor's gas powered blower was out of service. The Toro handles moderate size storms with ease. I can't tell you the exact break point but it cuts through 6-10 inches with ease. When the snow gets near the top end of the range you may have to hit the bank twice to clear the snow. In this service your biceps will be tired after plowing and uphill is definitely more work (but far better than shoveling). When the banks get much higher you will have to use a shovel to knock them down and then the Toro will throw them out of the way. February 10, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Nice Little Snow Blower Had my first opportunity to use the blower yesterday. It met my expectations and more. Really blew the snow a long ways. I bought an electric blower so I wouldn't have another gasoline engine to keep running, especially one that may only be used a couple of times in a year. It came assembled except for the handle. I can pick it up with one hand, so it should be easy to store on a top shelf out of the way. February 16, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Reliable snowblower This snowblower has been around for many years and has proven reliability. Our new one seems to work well although it may be cheapened up a bit with more plastic. These units are a great value for what they are designed for mid-sized and smaller driveways and sidewalks. Although they can tackle a little bigger job it requires patience and a longer cord, a bit of a pain compared to a big, but much more expensive, two stage gasoline powered unit. In heavier deep snow it struggles and requires a slow approach. For the majority of storms in our area it does quite well especially when you account for the convenience of electric and cost of this unit. December 22, 2015
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Life Saver Two women, full time jobs, involved in the community and more. Then we have SNOW! Who has the time or energy to work hard shoveling...we don't! So we decided to by a snow blower this year and this product was well worth it. Instead of having to take shift and take an entire hour out of our morning, I can get the sidewalk and driveway done in 15 minutes. It is very lightweight, able to handle a lot of snow and gets the job done quickly. I love this snow blower and would recommend it to others. February 10, 2015
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by A piece of junk I would have done better if I just used a shovel. This piece of junk could not handle 4 inches of snow. Three days after receiving this pile of junk, we got 4 inches of snow. It was defeated by 4 inches of light snow. There is no lock for the electric cord so the cord keeps coming undone. So when you have to start it up again and again, you have to keep taking your gloves off in order to get the starter button just right. Also, it blows snow back into your face because it has absolutely NO power. If there is anyone out there that you really despise, recommend this piece of junk. February 15, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by GREAT PURCHASE Finally used it first time with 30" snow that was not too heavy but not light either. Very easy to start and stop turning it off and on and maneuvering. Even though snow was deep, and at times I did shovel, it went right through it and I was amazed. Next time I won't even shovel but I was learning how to use it. Great purchase for a single woman like me, 62. I did buy the right power cord, 100 ft flexible in the cold cord, which was easy to use and I highly recommend. I used it in my driveway. This was recommended to me as I did not want to fuss in winter with gas/oil. January 31, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Great Little Machine Our driveway and walkway are right next to our house so we find It is great for our small space and, where we don't have a lot of ground to cover, the electric is perfect for us. It is light enough for moving in and out of storage and with the increased engine power (15 amps) it throws the snow a pretty good distance. Our original Toro lasted twelve years and the only problem we had with it was that the handle had to be replaced. If this one lasts as long as the first one we bought I will be very happy. February 16, 2016
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by works well Works really well for us (flat 85' long driveway). Our previous Power Curve 1800 got us through 21 northeast winters with NO maintenance - and our daughter still has it as backup if her husband is out of town. My machinery averse wife does not hesitate to pull it out and attack the driveway herself. Does not have the power of gasoline blowers but the convenience/ease of use is a major plus. Plug it in and go. Cleared 8" of wet snow last week with no problem. Invest in good 12AWG power cord. February 10, 2016
  • 2016-09-08 T11:45:04.847-05:00
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