Severe Weather Safety Tips



PREPARE YOUR BUSINESS 
FOR SEVERE WEATHER


Save time, money and business with The Home Depot’s five severe weather safety tips. Severe weather events like tropical storms, hurricanes, winter storms, blizzards, flooding, wildfires, tornadoes and even man-made disasters can and will happen. Follow our severe weather preparedness guide to help ensure the safety of your patrons, property and business.




1. Conduct a Risk Assessment

Conduct a risk assessment to identify potential hazards and analyze what could happen if an emergency occurs. Having a solid understanding of severe weather events and their probability will help you determine what resources you need to protect your business.

HURRICANES & TROPICAL STORMS

  • • Destructive Winds 
  • • Severe Flooding 
  • • Extended Loss of Power 
  • • Large-Scale Evacuation

SEASONAL & FLASH FLOODING

  • • Rapidly Rising Water 
  • • Powerful Moving Water 
  • • Severe Flooding

WINTER STORMS & BLIZZARDS

  • • Extreme Cold 
  • • Strong Winds 
  • • Whiteout Conditions 
  • • Heavy Snow Buildup

SEVERE STORMS & TORNADOES

  • • Destructive Winds 
  • • Unpredictability 
  • • Lightning & Fires
HEATWAVES & EXTREME HEAT

  • • Heat Exhaustion 
  • • Heat Stroke 
  • • Dehydration
STRUCTURE & WILDFIRES

  • • Fire Damage 
  • • Smoke Inhalation 
  • • Unpredictability 
  • • Erosion

2. Create a Preparedness Checklist

Make a severe weather preparedness checklist or use ours. Be sure to include all of the equipment and supplies you’ll need during and after a severe weather event. For example, if your location is likely to experience high or destructive winds, your list should include storm panels or plywood for window protection and hanging materials like screws or nails. Once you have a complete list, take inventory and stock up. Severe weather is not a question of if; it’s a matter of when.

3. Evaluate Your Property’s Vulnerabilities

Assess your property and catalog items and areas that are likely to be threatened by severe weather. Make a list of things like windows, doors, awnings and outdoor lighting, then note what needs to be done to secure them when severe weather strikes.

4. Develop a Recovery Plan

Create a plan that details what to do after a severe weather emergency. Share your complete plan with employees so everyone has a clear understanding of their roles and responsibilities during disaster recovery. The better your plan is, the faster you can get back to business.

5. Know Your Resources

Government organizations, such as The U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), are available to assist you with preparing and recovering effectively. Check out their emergency prep resources at Ready.gov.