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3/4 in. - 14 NPT x 42 in. Long Aluminum Anode Rod

$1269
  • Protects the water heater from corrosion to extends its life
  • Made from premium-quality aluminum for durability
  • Features a thumb wheel for convenient adjustment
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Price:
$1269

Product Overview

The Camco 3/4-Inch OD by 42-Inch anode rod extends the life of your water heater and protects it from corrosion. The anode rod is a self-sacrificing rod that attracts the minute pieces of metal that cause corrosion. This product also features a precision milled thumb wheel for easy adjustment.
  • Extends the life of your water heater
  • 3/4 in. OD x 42 in. long
  • Aluminum
  • Prevents or deters corrosion of exposed metals in the water heater
  • Attracts corrosion causing particles

Info & Guides

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Specifications

Dimensions

Product Depth (in.)
1.06 in
Product Height (in.)
42 in
Product Width (in.)
1.06 in

Details

Finish Family
Silver Metallic
Material
Aluminum
Pack Size
1
Product Weight (lb.)
1.5 lb
Returnable
90-Day

Warranty / Certifications

Manufacturer Warranty
1 Year Limited

Questions & Answers

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Customer Reviews

  • 4.8
    out of 107 reviews
  • 98% recommend this product
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Showing 1-10 of 107 reviews
I would strongly recommend this product.
I would strongly recommend this product. My experience changing the anode rod was very similar to Eddie’s. The Whirlpool water heater was just over 6 years old and after watching several Youtube videos I thought it was a good time to replace it. Although those videos didn’t mention how difficult it might be to get the old one loose. Like Eddie, I also needed a second person to hold the heater steady while I worked on the old one with a wrench and breaker bar (thanks James). Once it came loose, the rod easily lifted out. It was very corroded, but the mineral deposits hadn’t added to its size (see photos). I’d say the whole process of draining the heater, removing the old rod, installing the new one, refilling the heater and lighting the pilot took about an hour. The only negative in the process was that I had to order the rod and pick it up at the store so I didn’t get to use my military discount.
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    • Recommended
    I can recommend the product, but it is a bear to replace the anode rod. I looked at a half dozen ...
    I can recommend the product, but it is a bear to replace the anode rod. I looked at a half dozen Youtube videos prior to working on my own water heater. So I shut off the gas and turned off the water supply ball valve. Then I drained a couple gallons out of the water heater prior to beginning my work. My water heater is outside, so it was more convenient than working indoors having a low ceiling to contend with. Nonetheless, I first had to disassemble the sides and top of the metal water heater closet so that I could have room to turn the 1-1/16" top of the anode rod with a breaker bar. I had to use a 4' extension pipe over the 3/4" breaker bar to get enough torque to loosen the anode rod. At the same time, a second person was needed to hold the tank from turning while I applied counterclockwise torque with the breaker bar. It was definitely a two man job for that part of the job. Once the anode rod was unthreaded from the tank, I had to twist and turn it an inch at a time to work it completely out of the tank; apparently, the mineral deposits and corrosion on the rod built up the thickness of the rod, so I had to scrape it off little by little with a rocking/twisting motion as I pulled upwards on the rod. It probably took me 20 minutes just to do that. The water heater is about 10 years old, so I didn't know what the condition of the anode rod would be. I don't think it was in terrible condition, but it looks like I changed it at a pretty good time (see photo). Next, I wrapped 5x's teflon tape around the threads of the new anode rod before lowering it into the tank. I was careful not to cross thread it, so I started the threads by turning it by hand with the 1-1/16 socket on it. I snugged it up, reassembled the water heater closet top and sides, turned the water supply back on, waited for the tank to refill with water, and then lit the pilot and set the temperature. That was the first time that I'd ever changed an anode rod on a water heater. I'm not sure I want to go through all that trouble again. I may just call a plumber and get an estimate on having my water heater serviced/maintained. But I'm glad I'm done with the work at least for another 10 years.
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    • DIY
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    • Recommended
    12 people found this helpful
    Removing the old one was the hardest part, not much left of it. Replace yours today.
    Removing the old one was the hardest part, not much left of it. Replace yours today.
    by
    • Verified Purchase
    • Recommended
    1 person found this helpful
    This worked for me. Cut 12 inches off to clear...
    This worked for me. Cut 12 inches off to clear tank top to ceiling. Least expensive anode to get.
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      by
        Work like supposed to-no problems...
        Work like supposed to-no problems
        by
          Fit perfectly. Good value.
          Fit perfectly. Good value.
          by
          • Verified Purchase
          • Recommended
          Worked great. Fit perfectly.
          Worked great. Fit perfectly.
          by
          • Verified Purchase
          • Recommended
          Installed and it is the item I am looking for...
          Installed and it is the item I am looking for
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          • Verified Purchase
          Rating provided by a verified purchaser...
          Rating provided by a verified purchaser
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          • Verified Purchase
          Showing 1-10 of 107 reviews