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Internet # 314149593

Model # RRO-4E

Store SKU # 1005615519

RRO Series 87% AFUE Oil Water Boiler without Coil and 129,000 BTU - 158,000 BTU Output

$3105.89
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  • Energy-efficient and user-friendly features for convenience
  • Metal section connectors for longevity
  • User friendly integrated boiler control
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Product Details

About This Product

Rand and Reardon are efficient, cast iron, water boilers that have been trusted since 1858. Our units are extensively tested and proven. The RRO series are oil-fired water boiler that is designed for ease of service.

Highlights

  • Chimney vented
  • Integrated boiler control - user-friendly - energy-saving "thermal purge" feature circulates residual warm water in heating system prior to firing boiler - combination high limit circulator relay - extensively tested and proven
  • Cast iron heat exchanger - wet base design
  • Tankless coil available - for domestic hot water
  • Metal section connectors - resistant to chemicals, offer increased boiler longevity
  • Designed for ease of service - swing-away cast iron door provides easy access to combustion chamber
  • Installed nozzle gives input of 1.20 GPH for 148,000 BTU DOE capacity/ 129,000 BTU output
  • Also use nozzle with input of 1.50 GPH for 182,000 BTU DOE capacity/ 158,000 BTU output (not included, this size nozzle must be purchased separately)
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Product Information

Internet # 314149593

Model # RRO-4E

Store SKU # 1005615519

Specifications

Dimensions: H 31.625 in, W 24.625 in, D 22.375 in

Dimensions

Product Depth (in.)

22.375 in

Product Height (in.)

31.625 in

Product Width (in.)

24.625 in

Details

Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE) (%)

87

Capacity (gallons)

0

Color

grey

Color Family

Grays

Condensing/noncondensing

Noncondensing

Energy Consumption (kWh/year)

0

Fuel Gauge

No

Fuel Type

Heating Oil

Heat rating (BTU/hour)

129000 Btu/h

Heating Product Type

Boiler

Heating Technology Type

Radiant

Ignition Type

Electrical

Pack Size

1

Product Weight (lb.)

680 lb

Returnable

90-Day

Warranty / Certifications

Certifications and Listings

ETL Listed, Energy Star

Manufacturer Warranty

Limited Warranty

Questions & Answers

6Questions
caret
Q:How much if I have you install the boiler.
by|Mar 16, 2024
1 Answer
Answer This Question

A:  I am sorry but these questions are routed to the product supplier. Although I can answer questions about the product and boilers, I cannot speak effectively on Home Depots installation programs. For that I would suggest reaching out to your local store or the Home Depot national installation team at 855 459 9278. They will be able to tell you if installation is available in your area and if so, make arrangements to get you a price. Keep in mind the boiler is only one component in a heating system. When replacing a boiler it is often necessary or a good idea to also change some of the near boiler components.

by|Mar 19, 2024
    caret
    Q:Who can I hire to move the boiler into my basement
    by|Nov 15, 2023
    1 Answer
    Answer This Question

    A:  These questions are routed to the supplier of the product, so although I can answer questions about boilers, I can’t speak to Home Depot’s delivery services. For that I would suggest calling your local store. Perhaps they offer in home delivery in your area. As a plumber I can offer you the following based on my experience. I now own but use to rent a furniture moving dolly. That is a two wheeled hand truck with a strap that can be tightened to secure the material. They are very good for walking large loads down stairs. When faced with a difficult move I will often remove the burner and boiler jacket from the boiler prior to the move. Then reattached them when I get the boiler into the basement. The burner and jacket are removed during annual cleaning, so they are designed to be removed and reattached. Taking them off lightens the load and avoids the possibility of damage. In fact, when I was an apprentice, the boilers came know down. You would bring the components into the basement and assemble the boiler in place. Todays packaged boiler can sometimes be brought in, in one piece but on some jobs, with tight stairwells, you end up disassembling the boiler to gain better access.

    by|Nov 15, 2023
      caret
      Q:I am located in NJ and have a 2200 sq? home all 8? ceilings well insulated but some windows are storms and a bit drafty. What size mean in BTU gas fired boiler would you recommend. I was thinking a 110, 000 BTU output or between 106,000 to 110,000 BTU?s
      by|Feb 7, 2023
      1 Answer
      Answer This Question

      A:  There is no universal consistent relationship between square footage of floor space and how much heating capacity you need to install. When it is suggested there is, the formulas typically end up oversizing the product in the vast majority of cases which greatly decreases the efficiency and longevity of the equipment. As I am sure you can envision the same structure if located in Alaska is going to need a lot more capacity than it would if located in Florida. The proper way to size heating is to do a heat loss calculation. There are many free programs on line that will do this for you. Basically you enter room sizes, window sizes, construction type, geographic location, etc. and the program will calculate how much heat the structure will lose on the coldest hour of the coldest day of the typical year. Selecting the capacity that is matched to the actual load you will get the longest and most efficient run times. Sometimes if the current system is working properly I will base my choice on the information on the rating plate of the current boiler or I will look at the currently installed distribution capacity and work backwards. For example my home has 100’ of copper fin tube baseboard. I know that the brand and style that I have puts out 580 BTU’s per foot. So when buying a new boiler I knew to purchase one that had an output of 58,000 (100 x 580 = 58000) in order to take full advantage of my installed distribution capacity. However with all that said burning oil below 100,000 BTU’s is problematic. The fuel is so dense that you need the combustion chamber to get hot to burn the heavier oils contained in the fuel. If you don’t the unburned fuel turns to soot. I am in New England. Most of the homes for which I do heat loss calculations require 60-70 thousand BTU appliances. But if the fuel to be used is oil the customer ends up with an appliance over 100,000 BTU’s. Again simply because you can’t burn oil dependably at lower inputs. In most cases, what ultimately determines the size of the oil boiler is the choice of fuel rather than the structure. That is the nature of oil. If you would like to talk about you specific home please feel free to give me a call. Chris 978 651 3301

      by|Feb 7, 2023
        caret
        Q:How many square feet will this boiler heat
        by|Dec 10, 2022
        1 Answer
        Answer This Question

        A:  There is no universal consistent relationship between square footage of floor space and how much heating capacity you need to install. When it is suggested there is, the formulas typically end up oversizing the product in the vast majority of cases which greatly decreases the efficiency and longevity of the equipment. As I am sure you can envision the same structure if located in Alaska is going to need a lot more capacity than it would if located in Florida. The proper way to size heating is to do a heat loss calculation. There are many free programs on line that will do this for you. Basically you enter room sizes, window sizes, construction type, geographic location, etc. and the program will calculate how much heat the structure will lose on the coldest hour of the coldest day of the typical year. Selecting the capacity that is matched to the actual load you will get the longest and most efficient run times. Sometimes if the current system is working properly I will base my choice on the information on the rating plate of the current boiler or I will look at the currently installed distribution capacity and work backwards. For example my home has 100’ of copper fin tube baseboard. I know that the brand and style that I have puts out 580 BTU’s per foot. So when buying a new boiler I knew to purchase one that had an output of 58,000 (100 x 580 = 58000) in order to take full advantage of my installed distribution capacity. If you would like to talk about you specific home please feel free to give me a call. Chris 978 651 3301

        by|Jul 25, 2023
          1 found this answer helpful
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