18 in. x 24 in. Traditional 1 PVC Decorative Backsplash Panel in Crosshatch Silver-B50-21 at The Home Depot
Discontinued

Model # B50-21

Internet # 100521695

Store SKU # 877333

18 in. x 24 in. Traditional 1 PVC Decorative Backsplash Panel in Crosshatch Silver


18 in. x 24 in. Traditional 1 PVC Decorative Backsplash Panel in Crosshatch Silver
 

This item has been discontinued.
The Home Depot no longer carries this specific product.

$19.95 / each
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PRODUCT OVERVIEW

Model # B50-21

Internet # 100521695

Store SKU # 877333

Store SO SKU # 874528

Transform an ordinary kitchen or bathroom into a stylish space with the Fasade 18 in. x 24 in. PVC Backsplash. Its traditional silver crosshatch pattern creates an instant designer look, whether you're accenting a small area or an entire room. Cut the backsplash panels with scissors or a utility knife for quick and easy installation.

  • PVC material provides the classic look of traditional tin backsplash at a fraction of the cost
  • For remodeling or new construction, panels are water and corrosion resistant for exceptional durability
  • Metallic pattern dramatically changes the look of your room
  • Install easily using adhesive or high bond double sided tape
  • Note: Product may vary by store

Info & Guides

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SPECIFICATIONS

Adhesive backing  Yes  Assembled Depth (in.)  18 in 
Assembled Height (in.)  0.032 in  Assembled Width (in.)  24 in 
Color  Crosshatch Silver  Color Family  Metallics 
Decor Product Type  Adhesive Tile Backsplash  Material  PVC 
Pack Size  Returnable  90-Day 
Style  Pattern 

CUSTOMER REVIEWS

Rated 4.3 out of 5 by 10 reviewers.
Rated 5 out of 5 by Easy & inexpensive way to refresh an ugly backsplash I have used these panels at 2 homes now in the kitchen as an easy and inexpensive way to refresh the backsplash. The new house needs a new kitchen but that's a few years away and I needed to cover up the current ugly tile backsplash right away. With a few hours, no demo of the tile underneath and basic tools (scissors, measuring tape & caulk gun) my old backsplash was transformed! It's important to plan the area before you start cutting & also realize that the underside of the cabinets probably aren't square/even so a cardboard template can be helpful. Since I've used both now, I think that using the loctite adhesive to stick the tiles to the wall gives you a nicer final look than the double sided tape. March 12, 2013
Rated 4 out of 5 by Came out great as my backsplash I was a little hesitant since this isn't the traditional tile backsplash. However, the product is installing well for me. I have completed half of my kitchen so far (see attached pictures). It feels quality and while fitting into place was a little difficult, it overall has been moving quickly with the install. It also fits in beautifully with my vision for my ktichent.I would recommend this to my friends. July 15, 2013
Rated 5 out of 5 by This is a very good quality, cost effective and easy product I have to say I was not convinced that I was going to like this product when my wife insisted that this is what she wanted on the wall between the new counter top and cabinets. I'd spent literally hundreds of hours remodeling/renovating our kitchen and thought this could be a real nightmare to install properly and also concerned that the "fake" tin might look tacky. I have to admit that I was completely wrong on both points. I found the material very easy to work with. Cuts were very easy to make even cutouts for switch plates were quite easy with a very sharp razor knife, firm pressure and cutting from corners in to center (overshot one corner when I tried to do a continuous cut). The trick to success is measure multiple time and confirm and reconfirm that your cuts will be correct before making them. At $20 per sheet you don't want to waste sheets due to bad cuts. I found blue painter's tape, a sharpie, multi-purpose cutting tool (like straight tin snips), tape measure and a good drywall t-square were the perfect tools. It's very hard to make marks on this material so taping it off and drawing cut lines with sharpie worked well. I was amazed at how conducive the material was to very close trimming (e.g., if I was 1/8" off from what I needed, I could trim 1/8" or even less off without damaging the integrity of the edge). I chose to use "inside corner" trim all along the base against the granite backsplash as well as j-trim pieces for all exposed edges (the ends) as well as along the edge that butts up to the cabinets. I planned to do this with the assumption that it would be a little more forgiving if my cuts weren't perfect. As stated above, I soon found that I could make cuts that were close enough to perfect that I probably didn't need the trim along the edges that butted up to the cabinets or the backsplash. That being said, I ended up liking the look of the trim so stuck with it...although it did make installation a little more awkward (not significantly). I had one inside corner in my project and was happy with how easy it was and how forgiving the inside corner trim piece was. I also used the switch plate cover material. This is not the highest quality material but relatively easy to cut and apply and the final appearance is really nice. My only concern is how long it will hold especially considering I have a few minor air bubbles despite my best efforts. I bought a an extra pack of sheets in case a year or two from now I need to re-apply and the line is no longer available. I chose to use the 2-sided tape for installation. At first I was miserable because I was having an impossible time getting it to adhere to my walls, let alone getting the paper backing off once it was up. I soon realized that it was simply because my walls were extremely dusty...I had previously ripped down tiles and patched/smoothed the entire surface with joint compound which I then sanded smooth (no interest in replacing drywall). A quick coat of primer made all the difference in the world. After that the tape stuck well and the paper backing came off very easily once you teased out a corner. The tape is more forgiving than I had expected; if you place the panels lightly into place there is an opportunity to adjust. Once the panel is precisely where you want it apply firm pressure across all surfaces and it locks into place. I followed the directions and used 3 horizontal strips of tape for each panel (which after cutting were about 13.5" high) as well as one vertical strip on the overlapping edge between tiles. The project has been complete for a bout a week and so far everything seems to be holding snugly. I was amazed with the final results. I can find the seams where the overlap is if I look closely, but if you take 2 steps back they're virtually invisible. Also much to my surprise, the overall effect is that you have a high end tin backsplash. Of course if you inspect it, it's clear that the material is not actually tin, but the effect is truly metallic. I had about 18 linear feel to cover with varying heights (backsplash, behind/above stove, around window sill, etc). My total cost was under $250. This included all panels, trim, switch plate covers and mounting tape. I blew one panel with a bad cut and had lots of scrap (I didn't try to re-use any of the scrap because of the way the overlap seams are designed, it wouldn't be easy or clean). Overall it took me about 20 hours but I was ridiculously meticulous with my cuts. To give some perspective, the first 3 panels probably took me 10 hours total to cut and install, and the last 6 only took 10 hours...there's definitely a learning curve to it, but don't expect you can just slap it up. If I were to re-do the whole project now, it would probably take more like 10-12 hours...but again I'm somewhat of a perfectionist and could probably be done in 8. Only two minor complaints: There were very minor imperfections in the alignment of the pattern across pieces. This had no effect whatsoever on the appearance of the final installed product, but inspect the panels when you buy them, I did find one or two where the pattern was off by enough that it could have made a difference in the end product if I had used them. Second, similarly, inspect the trim pieces you purchase. A few that I picked up were slightly warped. I manipulated them to make them usable, but this could have been avoided if I had inspected them more closely at the store. in case i didn't make it clear enough earlier, I'm somewhat of a perfectionist about projects like this and my wife thinks I'm crazy for even noticing these imperfections because the end product looks literally almost perfect. Bottom line...I would highly recommend this product. It's very inexpensive, relatively easy to install, requires minimal skills and tools, and at the end of the day looks incredible. May 22, 2012
Rated 5 out of 5 by Nice tiles I used these for a project I was inspired to try from watching it on a TV improvement show. I built a table out of an old door and attached these tiles in the panels with double-sided tape then coated the entire table with a clear resin. Turned out super nice. They have a nice contrast with the dark wood color of the table. I'm a woman and by no means "handy" - but I would dare to install this myself as a backsplash. This company sells a variety of colors. They're easy to cut with scissors although a sharp cutting tool would be best; they also sell the edges to cover the imperfections left behind when you cut. April 4, 2009
Rated 5 out of 5 by An easy WOW! I had a cringe-worthy kitchen. The walls were painted butter yellow and the backsplashes were canary yellow tiles interspersed with ceramic tiles depicting poorly drawn medieval Tyrolean laborers engaged in beer bunging, butter churning, shoe making, candle dipping, basket weaving... Well, you get the point. Outdated and UGLY!!! Enter Fasade backsplash tiles. I chose the Traditional in crosshatch silver because it most looked like the Mexican handworked tin that I wanted to put into my kitchen but could not afford. The installation was easy! Make sure you watch the YouTube videos and read the instructions at the FasadeIdeas website. The only tools I had were scissors, painters tape (VERY useful to hold tiles together for measuring and double-checking fit and placement), a straight edge, a measuring tape, a dry erase marker (great for when you oops a line vs. the permanent Sharpie), silver spray paint (applied around outlet areas and edges to camouflage uneven areas) a caulk gun and the Loctite adhesive. I also used silver nail polish to paint the screws on the switchplates to match the adhesive covers applied thereon. Lots of J-trim to give the borders a finished look. The best advice I can give on working with this stuff is to tape it well, measure, measure, measure BEFORE you cut, fit it, trim it if necessary, apply the glue (and don't forget to spray it with water before adhesion), and press firmly. I actually had a heavy box of books that I ran over the tiles once on the walls to get out air bubbles as the surface I was applying to was uneven in spots. The glue definitely provides solid adhesion to the walls. The blue painters tape really allowed for precision cutting and fitting before the final gluing. I actually ended up doing four areas in Fasade: The two kitchen backsplashes, the wet bar, and a desk alcove. Once done, the results were amazing! The kitchen looks a lot more modern and contemporary and you cannot even see the seams with this pattern. I swapped out the previous brass knobs and faucets for brushed nickel and old appliances for shiny stainless steel. And it's amazing how elegant a coat of beige paint will make a room. Believe it or not, the house has gone now from being not able to be sold for over a year to being suggested as being on the next fundraising house tour....That's how good this stuff looks! February 19, 2014
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SHIPPING AND DELIVERY OPTIONS

Store Exclusive. This item is available for purchase in select stores only.