Model # 260691

Internet #100071059

Store SKU #260691

WeatherShield 6 in. x 6 in. x 8 ft. #2 Pressure-Treated Timber
0098168431668

WeatherShield

6 in. x 6 in. x 8 ft. #2 Pressure-Treated Timber

  • Pressure treated for Ground Contact
  • Common construction grade
  • Lifetime limited warranty
$20.77 /each

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Product Overview

The 6 in. x 6 in. x 8 ft. Pressure-Treated Pine Lumber has been treated for ground contact and is ideal for retaining walls, decks, stair support posts and walkways. It can be painted or stained.

California residents: see   Proposition 65 information

  • Manufactured from southern yellow pine
  • Micronized copper azole coating to protect against termites, rot and fungal decay
  • Smooth texture
  • 5-1/2 in. x 5-1/2 in. x 8 ft.
  • Paintable and stainable
  • Use for decks, play structures, raised beds, planter boxes, retaining walls, walkways, outdoor furniture, landscaping and other outdoor projects
  • Lumber, pressure-treated lumber, wood, pressure-treated wood, pine lumber, pine wood, 6 in. x 6 in. x 8 ft. lumber, 6 in. x 6 in. x 8 ft. wood
  • Acquire the 6 in. x 6 in. x 8 ft. pressure-treated pine lumber 6310254, that's paintable and stainable and ideal for retaining walls, decks, stair support posts and walkways at The Home Depot
  • Note: product may vary by store
  • Click to discover the benefits of pressure treated wood

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Customer Questions & Answers

24 Questions31 Answers

Customer Questions & Answers

6 in. x 6 in. x 8 ft. #2 Pressure-Treated Timber
6 in. x 6 in. x 8 ft. #2 Pressure-Treated Timber

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3 answers

how much lumber ?

This question is from 6 in. x 6 in. x 8 ft. #2 Pressure-Treated Timber
Asked by
dalton,Ga.
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May 15, 2015
8'x8' ground patio
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Asked by
Cherryville NC
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
September 14, 2015
Answer: 
I would suggest you visit "http://homedepot.bighammer.com/DesignerSeries/Store/Find" and use the application to design your 8'x8' ground patio...I have to assume this would be a ground level 8 foot x 8 foot wooden "deck platform" ....the application will produce an estimate of the materials and a simple design plan...you should contact your local county building department to determine if you need a Read More
I would suggest you visit "http://homedepot.bighammer.com/DesignerSeries/Store/Find" and use the application to design your 8'x8' ground patio...I have to assume this would be a ground level 8 foot x 8 foot wooden "deck platform" ....the application will produce an estimate of the materials and a simple design plan...you should contact your local county building department to determine if you need a permit and any local requirements etc. Always check with dig811 before digging any footings...
A note...to build an 12 x 12 might actually be only a small increase in price...just remember to keep to standard lumber lengths of 8', 12' or 16'...to save waste.
Hope this helps Read Less
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Asked by
Rochester NY
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
May 20, 2015
Answer: 
If you are planning on a patio using full thickness of these 6x6 timbers, you would need about 18 timbers. Remember a 6x6 is actual 5½"x5½". The length will be from 8' to 8'2". The math is 8 ft x 12" per foot = 96". 96"/5.5" = 17.45 timbers. Rounding up gets you to 18. You could probably get by with 16 or 17 timbers if you used a small gap like a 16d nail as a spacer to allow for rain drainage. I'd put Read More
If you are planning on a patio using full thickness of these 6x6 timbers, you would need about 18 timbers. Remember a 6x6 is actual 5½"x5½". The length will be from 8' to 8'2". The math is 8 ft x 12" per foot = 96". 96"/5.5" = 17.45 timbers. Rounding up gets you to 18. You could probably get by with 16 or 17 timbers if you used a small gap like a 16d nail as a spacer to allow for rain drainage. I'd put down a layer of landscape fabric underneath to keep weeds from growing up between timbers.
In my opinion, a patio this thick is overkill and a waste of money. You could use 4x4 (cheaper)for example, or even 2x6(way cheaper). If you used thinner lumber, good idea to put a gravel bed under the patio to ensure good drainage. PT in ground contact should last 20-30 years in normal conditions, even longer in arid parts of the country like the SW. I would drill holes and spike down the perimeter pieces with 2 or 3 ft lengths of rebar to keep everything in place. That's particularly important if you have freeze-thaw cycles where you live. Read Less
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May 15, 2015
Answer: 
This order would need to be 16 pieces by those measurements.
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2 answers

Could I use this as a decking for a bridge. Not support mind you those are steel girders. This woukd be the deck of the

This question is from 6 in. x 6 in. x 8 ft. #2 Pressure-Treated Timber
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July 8, 2016
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July 10, 2016
Answer: 
This can be used for decks, play structures, raised beds, planter boxes, retaining walls, walkways, outdoor furniture, landscaping and other outdoor projects.
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Asked by
Cherryville NC
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
July 10, 2016
Answer: 
6x6 would be suitable for bridge decking. The spacing of the support girders will determine the load carrying capacity of the structure. 4x6 would also be suitable and possibly save you some money.
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2 answers

Would you recommend using notched 6x6 treated lumber to hold up the double 2x8 framing for a 20x10 deck that I'll be bui

This question is from 6 in. x 6 in. x 8 ft. #2 Pressure-Treated Timber
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May 29, 2016
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June 2, 2016
Answer: 
Notching 6 x 6s may not be safe as it creates a weak point in the corner and will also void the treated warranty. Consult your local code official, engineer or architect for a good way to do this.
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Asked by
Cherryville NC
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
May 31, 2016
Answer: 
Jeff,
Most buidling inspectors now need to see beams (what you are describing as double 2x8) fully supported by 6 x 6 posts via a notch cut from the top of the post, that allows both members to be fully supported by the post. then each beam to post connection must have 2 of 5/8 galv carriage bolts, washers and nuts, to clamp the beams solidly to the post. The post should not be placed into the Read More
Jeff,
Most buidling inspectors now need to see beams (what you are describing as double 2x8) fully supported by 6 x 6 posts via a notch cut from the top of the post, that allows both members to be fully supported by the post. then each beam to post connection must have 2 of 5/8 galv carriage bolts, washers and nuts, to clamp the beams solidly to the post. The post should not be placed into the ground, it should be mounted in a galv steel post support, that sits on a concrete footer, that extends below the local frost depth. You mentioned 2 x 8's as beams...I would be doubtful if 2 x 8 doubled can span even 10 feet, unless there is going to be intermediate beam supports in the design. There are numerous online deck beam span calculators online you can use...if in doubt, always go to the next larger beam dimension...2 x 8 to 2 x 10 is only a little more expensive,,,but so much stronger. BTW...dont bury these posts in soil, they are rated for ground contact, not ground burial...the true ground burial posts are treated with much more chemicals...these will be fine so long as you use the post anchor and put down a concrete footer to raise the bottom of the post above ground level...
Hope this helps... Read Less
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2 answers

How many of the 6 by 6 by 8 inch timbers would I need to constructed a retainer wall that's 16 ft. wide 80 ft. long

This question is from 6 in. x 6 in. x 8 ft. #2 Pressure-Treated Timber
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May 19, 2016
And 5 1/2 ft deep
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May 20, 2016
Answer: 
You would need 3,360 timbers.
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Asked by
Cherryville NC
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May 20, 2016
Answer: 
I am assuming that the wall is 80 feet long and 5 feet 6 inches tall, with a slope area approx 16 feet back from the wall location. A retaining wall this long should really be professionally designed and built...if the wall needs to actually be 16 feet tall...do not attempt this project without expert design help. 80 feet in length will require ground embedded posts every four feet, with the posts Read More
I am assuming that the wall is 80 feet long and 5 feet 6 inches tall, with a slope area approx 16 feet back from the wall location. A retaining wall this long should really be professionally designed and built...if the wall needs to actually be 16 feet tall...do not attempt this project without expert design help. 80 feet in length will require ground embedded posts every four feet, with the posts embedded into the ground at least 2/3rd of the exposed height... so if the post is 5 feet 6 inches out of the ground, the post needs to be around 10 feet into the ground. Making the embedded posts at least 16 feet long, Plus all posts in the ground, will need to be a grade of treated pine suitable for ground embedment. These 6x6x8 items are rated for ground contact, not ground embedment. The wall should be constructed with a slope back into the hill side to enhance the strength of the wall. The horizontal 6x6 members should be offset on top of each other, plus horizontal brace and cross pieces should be added every 8 feet...with each layer screwed to the lower one at least every 16" with 10" lag bolts. So if you want the materials list for a wall 80 feet long and 5'6" high, you will need at least 22 of 6x6x16 ground embedment grade treated posts, plus 150 of 6x6x8 feet treated timber. You will also need 85 feet of slotted drain pipe plus a cover sock, and approx 10 cu yards of # 5 gravel for drainage behind the wall. You should also concrete each post into the ground using bagged concrete mix,,,again,,,I would strongly suggest a professional be consulted to undertake a project of this size, even at a height of 5'6"...if the wall is actually 16 feet tall, it really should not be built of timber...It should be a reinforced concrete block wall on a substantial concrete footer...
Good luck !!!
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Customer Reviews

6 in. x 6 in. x 8 ft. #2 Pressure-Treated Timber is rated 3.8 out of 5 by 16.
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Large brace posts for cattle gate These are exactly the pressure-treated products I wanted. They'll serve as braces for a cattle gate and do so for years. They're big and heavy so I needed some help lifting each one out of the stack. They have small surface cracks but those won't affect their mission so I'll put them into service imm'ly. Hats off the HD for have a large selection (35+) allowing me to pick and choose.
Date published: 2016-09-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Big heavy corner posts for my new pavillion. Big heavy 6x6 pressure treated lumber was great for extra-strong corner posts for my large 16-ft x 42-ft pavilion.
Date published: 2016-08-16
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Product was great.. Used the BOPIS to order and had my daughter and her boyfriend pick it up! Product was great.. Used the BOPIS to order and had my daughter and her boyfriend pick it up!
Date published: 2016-11-08
Rated 1 out of 5 by from gunk rot in 1 year .will not hold up light why do home depot sell junk pt 6x6
Date published: 2016-10-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from very good product very good product
Date published: 2016-11-09
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Worst lumber ever These timbers will warp,crack and split within one year used these on 21'x20 carport they look terrible next project I will go to an out door lumber store like lumber 84
Date published: 2014-06-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Very good product I had to cut two of timbers for my project. From what I can tell the pressure treatment chemical is more then half way through the timber.
Date published: 2015-11-08
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Crack & Warp The store personnel were great in helping load the 7 timbers I purchased. Within 2 weeks after installing these timbers, they are cracking and warping already. The one's they replaced were 13 years old. These will never last at the rate their splitting. There is no way I'd ever use these for structual supports of any kind. We're going to seal these and probably have to seal the cracks with silicone before winter. If it wasn't for the fact we cut some of these, I'd return them.
Date published: 2013-05-26
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