0052427420015

Gorilla

Model 42001

Internet #100670610

Store SKU #757442

7/8 fl. oz. General Purpose Epoxy

$5.47 /each

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Product Overview

Gorilla takes epoxy to a new level, the Gorilla tough level. Easy to dispense and use, Gorilla Epoxy brings a strong, long-lasting bond for household and automotive repairs, alike. The two-part, gap-filling formula easily bonds steel, aluminum, wood, ceramic, tile and much more.

  • Dries clear: ideal for clean, easy finishing
  • 5 minute set: plenty of repositioning time for the perfect fit
  • Gap-filling: fills voids and bonds uneven and vertical surfaces
  • Water resistant: withstands moderate exposure to water
  • Solvent resistant
  • Non-toxic once cured
  • Easy-to-use syringe: separate barrels of resin and hardener keep epoxy from hardening, plus syringe dispenses evenly and includes a cap for multiple uses
  • Click here for more information on Gorilla Glue

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19 Questions81 Answers

Customer Questions & Answers

7/8 fl. oz. General Purpose Epoxy
7/8 fl. oz. General Purpose Epoxy

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This question is from 7/8 fl. oz. General Purpose Epoxy
 
11 answers

Does GORILLA EPOXY bonds mirror glass and PVC?

This question is from 7/8 fl. oz. General Purpose Epoxy
Asked by
Mazyar
June 29, 2013
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Answers (11)

Asked by
Massachusetts
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May 19, 2015
Answer: 
Yes it will bond to both it is very strong
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Asked by
MI
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January 7, 2015
Answer: 
It likely will, but there is a high chance that the epoxy will etch the mirrors reflective coating. Best bet is to get a mirror mastic from a local glass shop.
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Asked by
SE Arizona
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August 20, 2014
Answer: 
I think it might work, even though PVC is tricky to glue onto glass, which is all the front of a mirror is,. I would suggest getting a scrap piece of PVC and trying to glue it to a piece of glass, first. Make sure both the PVC and the glass are clean, though.
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Asked by
Indianapolis
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June 17, 2014
Answer: 
The backing on the mirror might react or prevent attachment. If it is a cheap mirror you might try but I would be afraid of poor bonding. I would use mirror hangers to attach to PVC.
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Asked by
Florida, USA
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February 1, 2014
Answer: 
Yes i used it to bond my stand legs back on the stand. It is great for anything.
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Asked by
Coral Springs FL
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October 8, 2013
Answer: 
for sure.
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September 16, 2013
Answer: 
Yes. Epoxy will bond almost any surfaces.
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Asked by
Littleton, MA
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September 7, 2013
Answer: 
Yes, Gorilla Epoxy will bond mirror glass and PVC
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Asked by
Fresno, CA, USA
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August 21, 2013
Answer: 
For the life of me I can not figure why one would want to glue PVC to Mirror Glass. I have no idea why it wouldn't work...mix it light on the hardner and allow it to cure longer.
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Asked by
Rancho Santa Margarita, CA, USA
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July 9, 2013
Answer: 
Yes, it will bond to glass and PVC, but I would recommend roughing up the PVC with sand paper, first, to give it better adhesion.
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July 8, 2013
Answer: 
Hi Mazyar! Gorilla Epoxy will bond glass and PVC sheet - but not PVC pipe. We hope this information helps!
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This question is from 7/8 fl. oz. General Purpose Epoxy
 
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Can I use this to bond metal and wood?

This question is from 7/8 fl. oz. General Purpose Epoxy
Asked by
California
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June 28, 2014
I am trying to make a knife and I have to use epoxy to bond the wood handle to steel. Would this work?
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Asked by
Skagit County, WA, USA
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December 3, 2015
Answer: 
Absolutely
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June 1, 2015
Answer: 
two-part epoxy will bond pretty much anything to anything, as long as both surfaces are clean and dry
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Asked by
Massachusetts
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May 19, 2015
Answer: 
Absolutely it will work for that
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Asked by
Agawam MA
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April 2, 2015
Answer: 
Yes. That is pretty much all I use it for
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Asked by
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February 15, 2015
Answer: 
Yep. Just used some to attach steel to wood.
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Asked by
MI
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January 7, 2015
Answer: 
Yes, epoxy bonds to metal and wood.
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Asked by
SE Arizona
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August 20, 2014
Answer: 
This should work very well. This seems to bond as well, or better, than most epoxies. The only problems might be if you used an exotic wood that secretes oil. Then you would have to clean it well using ether, naphtha, or some other solvent to "dry" the wood's surface. Then wipe it off and immediately glue them together.
For further info, I suggest checking your local woodworking store or a woodworking Read More
This should work very well. This seems to bond as well, or better, than most epoxies. The only problems might be if you used an exotic wood that secretes oil. Then you would have to clean it well using ether, naphtha, or some other solvent to "dry" the wood's surface. Then wipe it off and immediately glue them together.
For further info, I suggest checking your local woodworking store or a woodworking site, such as Lumberjocks.com or Wood.com. Read Less
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Asked by
Littleton, MA
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August 10, 2014
Answer: 
Yes. The epoxy is dispensed in even portions of cement and activator from the syringe. It is then mixed and applied with a popsicle stick or similar applicator. Be sure to use plenty of epoxy for your application.
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Asked by
Florida, USA
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June 30, 2014
Answer: 
best glue works on anything I used it to help bond metal legs to wooden table.
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Asked by
California
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June 29, 2014
Answer: 
Never Mind I hadn't read the packaging it says that it does.
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This question is from 7/8 fl. oz. General Purpose Epoxy
 
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I have a roll-up/roll-down garage door that is made of fiberglass front and back over a foam core.

This question is from 7/8 fl. oz. General Purpose Epoxy
Asked by
steved47
Seaucus, NJ
August 21, 2013
The door is approximately 8 years old. The pull-up handle is secured to the bottom of the door by two self-tapping screws which have loosened up and no longer hold the handle in place. Can I use Gorilla Glue Epoxy to reset the screws and/or glue the handle directly to the door surface?
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June 1, 2015
Answer: 
It would probably work loose in time. This is too dynamic an application for adhesive. I would drill through and replace the screws with stainless-steel bolts and washers.
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Asked by
Massachusetts
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May 19, 2015
Answer: 
I had a similar problem with an automatic door closer on a metal door. The inside of the metal door was just foam type insulation and what happened to me is the plastic anchors I used to hold the closer to the door eventually pulled out.
Here's what I did I bought the Loctite Instant Mix epoxy at The Home Depot though because it has a long tube that automatically mixes the epoxy and allowed my to insert
Read More
I had a similar problem with an automatic door closer on a metal door. The inside of the metal door was just foam type insulation and what happened to me is the plastic anchors I used to hold the closer to the door eventually pulled out.
Here's what I did I bought the Loctite Instant Mix epoxy at The Home Depot though because it has a long tube that automatically mixes the epoxy and allowed my to insert it into the holes and filled them with epoxy as well as the surrounding areas. Have some rags and actetone ready for clean up
I then inserted new plastic anchors into hose holes and let it dry for 24 hours. Some epoxy got into the anchors but I drilled it out with a small drill bit to allow the screw to enter.
I then reattached the door closer and it is on there solid now.
It is worth a shot for you, also if you can drill the handle to take 2 screws on both sides and use the epoxy in those holes to it will help. The more of the epoxy you get into the door the stronger it will be
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Asked by
North Dartmouth, Dartmouth, MA 02747, USA
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February 24, 2015
Answer: 
YES, I believe that this epoxy would work nicely to glue handle to garage door. I suggest you get slightly bigger diameter self - tapping screws, glue handle to garage door using epoxy and then screw bigger screws into original holes. The screws will help keep door handle in proper location and serve as extra protection to make sure handle does not come off again.
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Asked by
West Virginia
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February 3, 2015
Answer: 
I would use this epoxy as a two-pronged approach to repairing the handle. Although I used the epoxy and feel it is very strong, the torque force applied to a handle is multi-directional. First take out the screws and move the handle 1" in any direction. Then mix up the epoxy and glue the handle to the new location, securing it until it dries. After it dries for a few hours, take your self-tapping screws Read More
I would use this epoxy as a two-pronged approach to repairing the handle. Although I used the epoxy and feel it is very strong, the torque force applied to a handle is multi-directional. First take out the screws and move the handle 1" in any direction. Then mix up the epoxy and glue the handle to the new location, securing it until it dries. After it dries for a few hours, take your self-tapping screws and drive them through the handle holes back into the door. You will then have a good fix with a surface bond between the handle and the door, plus the original attachment from the screws penetrating the door. Read Less
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Asked by
MI
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January 7, 2015
Answer: 
It should work. You might have to let the epoxy 'set up' before setting the screws or otherwise the epoxy might ooze out of the screw holes. Other caution would be that the epoxy might be brittle in cold temps. Worth a try (I'd try it myself if I were in your shoes).
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Asked by
Indianapolis
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June 17, 2014
Answer: 
You may end up degrading the foam. Would not use epoxy for this application. Fill the original holes and re-attach the handle in a new location.
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Asked by
South Milwaukee, WI, USA
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January 13, 2014
Answer: 
It should do a good job of holding the handle to the fiberglass. I would put it in the screw holes, and then put the screws in. You will not be able to remove the handle...
You could also make the holes somewhat bigger, and epoxy in the the threaded inserts you normally use in wood, and then use machine screws to hold the handle on. That way, it is still removable, and you can tighten it up after the Read More
It should do a good job of holding the handle to the fiberglass. I would put it in the screw holes, and then put the screws in. You will not be able to remove the handle...
You could also make the holes somewhat bigger, and epoxy in the the threaded inserts you normally use in wood, and then use machine screws to hold the handle on. That way, it is still removable, and you can tighten it up after the epoxy is set. Read Less
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September 16, 2013
Answer: 
I don't know if this is how I would fix the problem you describe.
I would probably use through bolts with washers and nuts on the other side to secure handle to door. Epoxy would secure handle to door, but the spot where you glued could break off of the door.
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Asked by
Littleton, MA
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September 7, 2013
Answer: 
Yes, provided the handle provides enough surface area for Gorilla Epoxy to be applied. SInce the handle has to withstand the force of opening the garage door, be sure to cover all contact points throughly and allow the product a day or two to achieve a full strength bond.
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Asked by
Fresno, CA, USA
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August 21, 2013
Answer: 
I would think that either solution would be fine. Fill the holes with a little sawdust and mix it well with the epoxy...let it set and replace your screws. For a more permanent fix apply some epoxy to the handle as well.
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This question is from 7/8 fl. oz. General Purpose Epoxy
 
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Can one use it to repair seams in between slabs of granite?

This question is from 7/8 fl. oz. General Purpose Epoxy
Asked by
leenaud
August 13, 2013
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Asked by
Long Island, NY, USA
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July 24, 2015
Answer: 
I would think so. I used it to glue an onyx bookend back together and it's a heavy eagle with the break through his little legs. It dried completely clear and is adhering the onyx very well.
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June 1, 2015
Answer: 
This might actually be the best thing for this purpose, but it could also get very messy, and the mess might be permanent. Gel-type super glue would also work, and can be cleaned up with acetone.
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Asked by
Massachusetts
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May 19, 2015
Answer: 
where is the granite? And how big are the seams?caulking might be better
This product would be difficult to get into small seams
If to try it have rags and acetone handy to clean up the edges and use a small applicator to get it in the seams like a tooth pick.
Remember its sets in 5 minutes too
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Asked by
MI
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January 7, 2015
Answer: 
Yes. Granite installers use epoxy on those seams during install. BUT, they also have a colored filler. If you use this product as is, you will have a 'clear' joint that yellows with time.
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Asked by
Indianapolis
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June 17, 2014
Answer: 
No.
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Asked by
New York, NY, USA
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December 24, 2013
Answer: 
When joining materials you have to consider the weight of the material. Epoxy will seal a stone joint, but will not hold if under the weight of the stone. I've used it to waterproof a marble door saddle nicely, gluing the two half's together, but the inset mortar was carrying the stone's weight.
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Asked by
Coral Springs FL
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October 8, 2013
Answer: 
I would not recommend this product for that use.
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Asked by
Littleton, MA
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September 7, 2013
Answer: 
Yes
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Asked by
Fresno, CA, USA
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August 21, 2013
Answer: 
I would only use adhesive approved by a granite fabricator.
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August 15, 2013
Answer: 
Hello leenaud!
It is very common for granite to be attached to the cabinet frame with epoxy.
And, epoxy may even be used on the unseen portion of a joint between slabs.
But silicone rubber caulk in a color most similar to the granite is most often used in the exposed portion of the joint.
The difference: epoxy makes an unsightly seam that doesn't match the granite, while silicone rubber caulk makes a Read More
Hello leenaud!
It is very common for granite to be attached to the cabinet frame with epoxy.
And, epoxy may even be used on the unseen portion of a joint between slabs.
But silicone rubber caulk in a color most similar to the granite is most often used in the exposed portion of the joint.
The difference: epoxy makes an unsightly seam that doesn't match the granite, while silicone rubber caulk makes a water barrier which may not be seen at all.
NOTE:
Marine supply houses sell colorants that can be added to epoxy products ... they are quite costly.
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Customer Reviews

Rated 4.5 out of 5 by 71 reviewers.
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by HOLDING GOOD HAD TO USE A GLUE THAT WOULD STICK RUBBER TO MARBLE, I USED Rubber Auto and Marine Weatherstrip GLUED TO A Marble Threshold. THIS WILL SEAL THE DOOR BETWEEN THE MARBLE AND THE DOOR. SO FAR IT IS STILL HOLDING GOOD. I HOPE I WILL BE ABLE TO USE THE REST FOR OTHER PROJECTS ( HOPE IT WILL NOT HARDEN UP IN THE TUBES ). I PLAN ON MAKING GOOD USE OF THIS PRODUCT ON FUTURE PROJECTS. March 24, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Gorilla Epoxy Instructions are very easy to follow. I had a shoe orthotic made of a hard rubber compound that was breaking so I wanted something good to use. Superglue was tried a few weeks ago but came apart quickly. This hardened to full strength within half an hour. I pulled out some aluminum foil to mix the epoxy and applied the mixture to my orthotic and so far so good. I set the orthotic on the foil as well and was able to slide it away from the dripped mixture and helped with an easy cleanup. July 31, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Excellent bond strength; Longer cure time. I use Gorilla brand epoxy for joining metal to metal, metal to wood, and metal to some plastics in projects. I sometimes use it joining wood to wood instead of gorilla glue as the epoxy does not expand like their glue. The epoxy working/set up time is about the same as other 5 minute epoxies. Once you have mixed the 2 parts together you have about 5 minutes to use what you've mixed before it loses its workability. Make sure your have your pieces cut, cleaned, arranged and are ready to assemble (and clamp if necessary) before you mix up a batch of epoxy. Also, remember that it does not take much of this product to produce an extremely strong bond. June 18, 2015
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by For Those Really Tough Jobs PU glues expand when applied properly [wet surfaces before applying]. In those really tough spots when the parts won't make intimate contact or where you can't get to the joint to apply a lot of pressure, these glues have an advantage over conventional wood glues. Since it expands [about doubling in size], you don't need to fill the cavity full. Open time is great, giving ample time to position/reposition parts. Bond is brittle; 'overages' easily chiseled and sanded. Down side of the PU glues is that, once opened, shelf life is very short no matter how well you reseal the bottle. So my advice is to buy it in small quantities. February 28, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by awesome glue!! This is the best glue epoxy ever. You just mix the glue and apply it to the broken item, you press the 2 pieces together and hold it tightly for a little bit- the bond is super awesome, really holds the parts together very well. There is a lot of glue provided so you can fix a lot of things with just one tube, which makes it a good investment for a good price June 2, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Helped with Kitchen Drawer This worked wonders on our kitchen drawer face/front which had come apart from the rest of the drawer. We really didn't want to use nails to attach it back together. My husband mixed the epoxy, which looked like an easy enough process. We applied it to the drawer face quickly and held it in place for about 5-6 minutes, as the directions state. We then let it set overnight. We now have a functioning drawer once again and it has stayed strong so far! May 3, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Easy to use The container makes it so easy to mix a 2-part epoxy glue. It is not fool-proof, though. I found that I must exert equal pressure to both sides of the pump to get the two parts to come out in equal quantities. And this is key to a proper epoxy mix. The first couple of times I used it, I held and pumped the glue out with one hand going across both sides. But this yielded uneven output because the pump is a shared rocker type design. So I switched to a 2-handed approach so I could easily control output of each side. The glue comes out clear and very liquid. It is then easily mixed with the provided ice cream stick. If the glue is mixed correctly it does start to thicken and set up quite quickly- within just a few minutes. If the mix is uneven at all, then it stays liquidy much longer, so it is easy to know if you mixed it evenly. It dries clear and a little gummy on the surface. Perhaps the gumminess will subside over time, but my repairs are less than a week old right now. I used it to fill in chips in porcelain/ceramics. I glued a heavy solid onyx eagle bookend back together at his little legs and its holding. I also filled old screw holes in a wood cabinet door and about a half hour later was able to drill new holes directly next to the filled holes and the drill did not travel into them. It has a cap that covers both sides and seem to seal pretty well. The wood stick can be wiped off and tucked behind the plastic label/joker in the space between the two tubes. Because of this clever container, I will use epoxy over super glue when I should now! July 24, 2015
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Not Bad! Rock Solid Took more than the 5 minutes to glue a wood corner strip to a stair, but the results is that the wood corner strip is on solid - for me, the benefit is epoxy gluing the piece without nails for this specific application. I was a little worried after the first five minute, but waited the day and now it is set. May 24, 2015
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