0098268253764

Model 500800

Internet #100426993

Store SKU #396787

Hot Water Recirculating System with Built-In Timer

$199.00 /each
  • Quiet, maintenance-free operation
  • Includes all parts needed for installation
  • Works on any system without additional piping

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Product Overview

Never wait for hot water again. The Watts Hot Water Recirculating Pump provides hot water at every faucet or shower when needed, eliminating wasted water. It is easy to install on any water system and requires no additional piping. The unique design of the pump ensures quiet, maintenance-free operation. The system includes a built-in 24 hour, dual setting programmable timer to activate the pump only when needed.

California residents: see   Proposition 65 information

  • Conserve water up to 15,000 Gal. of water per year
  • Save money up to 10% of your water bill
  • Maintenance free
  • Easy to install in less than 1 hour
  • Includes everything you need- pump with timer and 10 ft. electric cord, two adapters with rubber washers, valve mounting screws, sensor valve, two 12 in. supply lines
  • Additional sensor valves available for homes with multiple plumbing loops
  • Click here for more information on Electronic Recycling Programs

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Customer Questions & Answers

151 Questions663 Answers

Customer Questions & Answers

Hot Water Recirculating System with Built-In Timer
Hot Water Recirculating System with Built-In Timer

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13 answers

I have had this installed but I am getting too much warm water out of my cold faucets. How do I adjust so cold comes out the cold faucets?

This question is from Hot Water Recirculating System with Built-In Timer
Asked by
Post Falls Idaho
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October 9, 2014
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Answers (13)

Asked by
California
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August 16, 2016
Answer: 
If the pump stopped pumping once hot water reached the sink this wouldn't be a problem. These systems utilize a Normally Open thermostatic valve that closes only after 94F water contacts the valve. Once closed the valve won't open until heat loss occurs in the hot water pipe dropping the temperature below the valves specified temperature. This results in 93F water entering your cold water line at the Read More
If the pump stopped pumping once hot water reached the sink this wouldn't be a problem. These systems utilize a Normally Open thermostatic valve that closes only after 94F water contacts the valve. Once closed the valve won't open until heat loss occurs in the hot water pipe dropping the temperature below the valves specified temperature. This results in 93F water entering your cold water line at the same rate at which heat is being lost through convection in your hot water lines. There is a video on youtube showing that's normal to wait as much as 80 seconds for cold water at taps which have these valves installed. Read Less
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Asked by
West Virginia
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
February 23, 2016
Answer: 
You should not have much hot water, but your cold trunk line could be full of warm water. If you want to get hot water 15 minutes after you ran hot water, the water in your hot water pipe has cooled, and the pump will push all that warm water into your cold line until hot makes it to that far faucet. Then if you turn on the cold anywhere along that trunk line, you'll get some warm water. The only way to Read More
You should not have much hot water, but your cold trunk line could be full of warm water. If you want to get hot water 15 minutes after you ran hot water, the water in your hot water pipe has cooled, and the pump will push all that warm water into your cold line until hot makes it to that far faucet. Then if you turn on the cold anywhere along that trunk line, you'll get some warm water. The only way to prevent that, is to run a dedicated line back to the hot water tank. Read Less
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Asked by
Palmdale
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
February 1, 2016
Answer: 
from the installation instructions: NOTE: Please understand this is not an anti-scald device. You may have some warm water in your cold water line under the sink where the valve is installed. Once the cold water line is
opened, the warm water will dissipate in a very short time.
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Asked by
Silver Springs, FL
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January 14, 2016
Answer: 
There is no solution to hot water in the cold supply except to wait for cold water to flow back to the faucet. The cold supply is the circulation route back to the heater. Any other fixtures on that branch will also have hot water on the cold side. What is saved in heating is lost in wasted metered water or power to a pump.
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Asked by
Pittsburgh
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
December 7, 2014
Answer: 
If i'm reading your question right, you're getting hot water feeding back into your cold supply line, all the way from the "T" where the return feeds back to the cold line. So you're getting hot water from ALL your cold taps, not just the one(s) with the sensor.
The simple fix for that problem is to put in a check valve (one way valve) so the circulated water can't backwash into your main cold water Read More
If i'm reading your question right, you're getting hot water feeding back into your cold supply line, all the way from the "T" where the return feeds back to the cold line. So you're getting hot water from ALL your cold taps, not just the one(s) with the sensor.
The simple fix for that problem is to put in a check valve (one way valve) so the circulated water can't backwash into your main cold water line.
Here's a diagram in the form of a sentence: Say your cold comes in, then branches to the cold taps in your kitchen…then another branch to cold taps in your bathroom…another to a basement faucet…X…H…and goes into your water heater.
"H" is where the return water from your sensor valve comes in (it should be near the water heater). "X" is where you want a one-way valve, so that water can't flow backwards to the rest of your system. Between the return and the rest of the system.
That way, you have a one way path from the water main to your water heater. And you have a loop from your water heater to your hot water tap and back to your water heater.
I used one of these for sub-floor heating, and one for its official purpose (different house). Both houses had this issue (maybe both have low water pressure, relative to the pressure from the pump, or maybe it had to do with relative heights, so gravity was making problems). A shark-bite check valve solved the problem in both places.
On the other hand, if you're trying to get cold water from your "instant hot" shower…then yes, at times the cold will run warm-to-hot for a brief moment. It's still a lot less water waste than waiting for the hot water to heat up.
BTW, I do recommend hacking this product for sub-floor heating purposes. I've only tried it in a smaller space, but so far, so good. Read Less
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Asked by
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October 20, 2014
Answer: 
Hi,
The sensor does not seem to be working correctly, or has not been installed correctly. To gather more information and help you further, please contact Customer Service: by phone: (888) 321-0500 or email: RetailCS@wattswater.com.
Thank you, Watts Retail Group Customer Service
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Asked by
Sacramento, California
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
October 14, 2014
Answer: 
Sounds like the sensor valve may not be closing at 98 degrees as advertised. Is the cold water warm at other faucets? Try this.... Run the cold water until it's cold at the faucet where the sensor valve is installed. Then run the warm water until it's nice and hot. Wait a few minutes and run the cold water again. If it's warm then the sensor valve has opened when it shouldn't. Warranty time! Call Read More
Sounds like the sensor valve may not be closing at 98 degrees as advertised. Is the cold water warm at other faucets? Try this.... Run the cold water until it's cold at the faucet where the sensor valve is installed. Then run the warm water until it's nice and hot. Wait a few minutes and run the cold water again. If it's warm then the sensor valve has opened when it shouldn't. Warranty time! Call customer support.. Good luck my man.
David Read Less
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Asked by
SoCarolina
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
October 13, 2014
Answer: 
There is no adjustment to make. The recirculating pump uses your hot and cold water lines to recirculate hot water in both lines to keep the hot ready at all faucets and fixtures for you. When you turn on the cold side of a faucet you will have to wait a few seconds for the hot to clear out before you get actual cold water. This is the trade-off for having truly instant hot water. The wait for cold water Read More
There is no adjustment to make. The recirculating pump uses your hot and cold water lines to recirculate hot water in both lines to keep the hot ready at all faucets and fixtures for you. When you turn on the cold side of a faucet you will have to wait a few seconds for the hot to clear out before you get actual cold water. This is the trade-off for having truly instant hot water. The wait for cold water to reach a faucet with the pump installed will still be less than the wait for hot water to reach it if you did not have the pump installed. You decide which is more valuable to you. Keep in mind, if you are in a colder climate, the wait for hot water gets much longer in the winter months and the added benefit of this recirc pump is that it warms the cold lines, preventing freezing. Read Less
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Asked by
Lake County, CA, USA
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Home Improvement Profile: Other
October 12, 2014
Answer: 
IF YOU INSTALLED IT PROPERLY IE THE CROSS CONNECTION VALVE YOU WELL GET
A LITTLE WARM WATER. ARE YOU SURE THE VALVE INSTALL IS CORRECT. I DO NOT KNOW
OF ANY OTHER FIX
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Asked by
Novi, MI
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October 12, 2014
Answer: 
You would have to run a return line from the last hot tap area on the line from the water heater, back to the cold line near where it feeds into the water heater, and have the pump in that line. Possible to do in a house with basement where the last hot tap on the line is on the first floor.
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Asked by
Phoenix, Arizona
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
October 11, 2014
Answer: 
Contact manufacture's customer support. Let us know what they say
David
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Asked by
Phoenix, Arizona
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October 11, 2014
Answer: 
I have heard that the manufacture's customer support is quite responsive. I suggest you contact them. Please let us know what they have to say.
David
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Asked by
Roseville, CA
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
October 11, 2014
Answer: 
You don't adjust it, it is what it is. However, I've found that it only takes about 5 to 10 seconds to get cold water. It it takes a lot longer than that, you may have a bad mixer valve. There is a test in the booklet that says how to check it.
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12 answers

DO I REALLY NEED THE PUMP OR WILL JUST THE SENSOR VALVE DO THE TRICK

This question is from Hot Water Recirculating System with Built-In Timer
Asked by
STOCKBRIDGE GA
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May 25, 2014
lF I UNDERSTAND THE PUMP ONLY INCREASES THE PRESSURE.
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Answers (12)

Asked by
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March 21, 2016
Answer: 
Actually I think it depends on your water heater. We installed the sensor first, then surprisingly had instant hot water without installing the pump. We have a 3 story house and it used to take 2-3 minutes for the hot water to get to the 3rd floor, now it takes 10-15 seconds to be very hot and is warm when you first turn it on. After this worked we did some research and our water heater already has a Read More
Actually I think it depends on your water heater. We installed the sensor first, then surprisingly had instant hot water without installing the pump. We have a 3 story house and it used to take 2-3 minutes for the hot water to get to the 3rd floor, now it takes 10-15 seconds to be very hot and is warm when you first turn it on. After this worked we did some research and our water heater already has a pump because it is indirect heating from our boiler. You could try it and see how it does for you. Read Less
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Asked by
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November 23, 2015
Answer: 
Yes you will need the pump. You will need to set the timer as well.
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Asked by
Sacramento, California
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
May 30, 2014
Answer: 
You need the pump. The pressure will be equal on both sides and the hot water will not flow without it. Be sure to use Teflon tape when you install the pump.
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Asked by
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May 27, 2014
Answer: 
The valve simply allows the hot and the cold lines to cross each other--it is the pump that actually circulates the hot water through the house allowing for the quick hot water. As other posters have stated, you MUST have BOTH the pump at the water heater, and at least one sensor valve installed at the faucet furthest from your water heater in order for the system to function.
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Asked by
Lake County, CA, USA
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Home Improvement Profile: Other
May 27, 2014
Answer: 
NO DOES NOT INCREASE PRESSURE. MY HOME IS TWO STORIES,AND THE PUMP ON A TIMER
INSURES I HAVE HOT WATER DURING PERIODS DURING THE DAY WE WILL NEED HOT WATER.
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Asked by
Phoenix, Arizona
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
May 27, 2014
Answer: 
Yes you need the pump to put a small amount of pressure on the system to circulate the heated water to the sensor valve . As long as the sensor valve is open the heated water flows to the faucet . When the heated water is there the valve closes and stops the flow. When the water cools the valve opens & allows the water to flow until the heated water reaches the hot water tap. At least that is the way is Read More
Yes you need the pump to put a small amount of pressure on the system to circulate the heated water to the sensor valve . As long as the sensor valve is open the heated water flows to the faucet . When the heated water is there the valve closes and stops the flow. When the water cools the valve opens & allows the water to flow until the heated water reaches the hot water tap. At least that is the way is understand it. Read Less
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Asked by
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May 26, 2014
Answer: 
I Think you need the pump
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Asked by
Chesapeake, VA, USA
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
May 26, 2014
Answer: 
The pump pushes the hot water thru the pipes, the sensor is open if the water is cold. The sensor will close when the warm water gets to it. When the pump operates it will push the cold water back to the hot water heater. The sensor alone will not do anything since there is no pump to re-circulate the cold water. The same goes for the pump, by itself it will not work like it is supposed to.
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Asked by
Royse City, TX
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May 26, 2014
Answer: 
The pump is what regulates the water temp by circulating the hot water through your pipes. There is no sensor valve, the pump works on a timer. The premise is you circulate hot water when you are most likely to be using the hot water.
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Asked by
Denton, Texas
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
May 26, 2014
Answer: 
Yes you need the pump
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Asked by
Mound City, Ks
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
May 26, 2014
Answer: 
If you use only the sensor valve, you may get some hot water based on convection. And you may not. My experience is when the pump is not circulating then the hot water gets cold and takes the great amount of time that it used to take to get hot water. If you use the pump, you can set the timer so you only get the circulation when you really need the hot water and not the times you really do not need that Read More
If you use only the sensor valve, you may get some hot water based on convection. And you may not. My experience is when the pump is not circulating then the hot water gets cold and takes the great amount of time that it used to take to get hot water. If you use the pump, you can set the timer so you only get the circulation when you really need the hot water and not the times you really do not need that hot water, thus saving on energy. And when it it circulating water then you get the hot water immediately. So my answer it you you really do need the pump. The pump does not increase any pressure but circulates the water. If there is no water movement then the water cools and takes time to reach the faucet like it did prior to the pump. Read Less
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Asked by
SoCal
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
May 26, 2014
Answer: 
You will need both. If the pump is off and the temperature of the water in the lines drops enough to open the valve, the water is still not able to reciculate to the water heater and back witout the pump running. So you'll have have to pop for the entire product, not just the extra valve. lol
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10 answers

can this pump be used with tankless hot water heaters?

This question is from Hot Water Recirculating System with Built-In Timer
Asked by
Cincinnati, OH
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March 5, 2015
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Answers (10)

Asked by
California
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August 17, 2016
Answer: 
Tankless water heaters require .75gpm to ignite the burners. This system DOES NOT work with tankless water heaters. Consider a TL4000n with an Intelli-circ controller.
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Asked by
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January 4, 2016
Answer: 
I like my tankless water heater. I do not waste water while it heats up for a shower, shaving or washing dishes in a sink.
I let the water run into a bucket then transfer the water to the washing machine. I have used only cold water with my clothes for many years. My water bill has gone down with this method and I am saving water.
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Asked by
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December 25, 2015
Answer: 
I think some responders here either don't understand the question or don't understand how a tankless works. Tankless systems WILL provide unlimited hot water by heating it upon demand. However, it then has to deliver it through cold pipes and purge the cool water which resides in those pipes. The water is wasted down the drain and it takes time for the heated water to reach distant taps. Circulation Read More
I think some responders here either don't understand the question or don't understand how a tankless works. Tankless systems WILL provide unlimited hot water by heating it upon demand. However, it then has to deliver it through cold pipes and purge the cool water which resides in those pipes. The water is wasted down the drain and it takes time for the heated water to reach distant taps. Circulation pumps for tankless systems require larger pumps to move sufficient water to trigger the heater to turn on. Read Less
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Asked by
Latrobe, CA
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
August 26, 2015
Answer: 
I'm not sure why some of these answers are so terse, I also find no reference to this in the manual and the Home Depot description includes 'all systems'. There are good reasons to want this with a tankless system, the primary one being to save water.
The short answer however is no, this system will not work with a tankless system. This is because the pump and valve can't move enough water to meet the Read More
I'm not sure why some of these answers are so terse, I also find no reference to this in the manual and the Home Depot description includes 'all systems'. There are good reasons to want this with a tankless system, the primary one being to save water.
The short answer however is no, this system will not work with a tankless system. This is because the pump and valve can't move enough water to meet the minimum flow rate to get a tankless heater to ignite; this typically requires somewhere between 0.4 and 0.75 GPM. So while it will move water around it will never get hot. Not only is the pump underrated for a tankless system, but the way the valve is installed will also reduce the flow rate and likely render the solution unacceptable (in other words you can't just buy a bigger pump). This information should be made clear to prospective buyers.
There are solutions like this for tankless systems, they require a bit more research and care in installation, they're also a little more expensive. The bottom line, if you have a tankless system keep looking. Read Less
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Asked by
New Mexico
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May 7, 2015
Answer: 
I don't see why not. As long as you can install the pump somewhere on the hot water outlet. The system doesn't care how it gets it hot water.
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Asked by
Mound City, Ks
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
March 15, 2015
Answer: 
I have no clue how you might use this with tankless system. Usually the reason for tankless is to cost less heating the water and having the system at the point of use.
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Asked by
Sacramento, California
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
March 9, 2015
Answer: 
Yes. But you might be gilding the lily. The tankless water heater should give you instant hot water. If not, there may be a problem with the tankless system. The re-circ system will deliver hot water to the tankless system and reduce the power used there but heating hot water seems to fall into the 'misappropriated asset' category.
Good luck and stay warm.
David in Sacramento
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Asked by
Royse City, TX
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March 8, 2015
Answer: 
Per the manual, no.
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Asked by
Nutrioso Arizona
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
March 8, 2015
Answer: 
Yes
unless they are right at the sink itself.
JD
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Asked by
SoCarolina
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
March 6, 2015
Answer: 
No. Check previous asked and answered questions to find out why.
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8 answers

Does this unit heat up the water in the toilets?

This question is from Hot Water Recirculating System with Built-In Timer
Asked by
sarasota, florida
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August 13, 2016
I was wondering if this unit causes issues with warm water in toilets?
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Answers (8)

Asked by
Royse City, TX
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
August 22, 2016
Answer: 
The unit uses the cold water line as part of the circulation, but the cold water does not rise significantly. The manifold stops the flow at 98 degrees, and I have only noticed temporary 'warm' cold water at the manifold sink when I have the system activated, other facuets do not seem to have the issue. So no, no issues with water in the toilets.
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Asked by
central CA
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
August 16, 2016
Answer: 
highly unlikely - it circulates warm water thru your hot water pipe to a valve under your sink - the warm water moves past the valve, then up the cold pipe back to your heater tank
if your toilet fill pipe is hooked up to the cold pipe AFTER the sink connection, warmth could slowly migrate by conduction (not by circulation) to the toilet fill point - that small amount of warm water waiting at the fill Read More
highly unlikely - it circulates warm water thru your hot water pipe to a valve under your sink - the warm water moves past the valve, then up the cold pipe back to your heater tank
if your toilet fill pipe is hooked up to the cold pipe AFTER the sink connection, warmth could slowly migrate by conduction (not by circulation) to the toilet fill point - that small amount of warm water waiting at the fill point could only get into the toilet tank when you flush, and then it would mix with a much larger amount of cold water from the cold pipe going to refill the tank
- your fill-pipe water never goes directly into the bowl
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Asked by
Sacramento, California
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
August 15, 2016
Answer: 
No. Absolutely no. The system uses the cold water plumbing as the return for the instant hot water and, therefore, the cold water side can be a little warm, not hot but a little warm. So the water entering the toilet tank might be luke warm. This will not cause any issues with normal plumbing operation and should not have any effect on the toilets. This is a great system. Every time I wash my face or Read More
No. Absolutely no. The system uses the cold water plumbing as the return for the instant hot water and, therefore, the cold water side can be a little warm, not hot but a little warm. So the water entering the toilet tank might be luke warm. This will not cause any issues with normal plumbing operation and should not have any effect on the toilets. This is a great system. Every time I wash my face or take a shower, I bless the day I installed this system! Instant hot water!! Yahoo!!!!!! Read Less
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August 15, 2016
Answer: 
No, the unit does not heat up water in a toilet.
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Asked by
New Mexico
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
August 15, 2016
Answer: 
Not unless you've got a hot water line going to your toilet. You should only have the cold water line going to the toilets which means the hot water will never reach the toilets since you need both lines to create the loop that is needed to circulate the hot water.
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Asked by
Pleasanton, CA
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August 15, 2016
Answer: 
NO. Toilets are set up to use the cold water supply, not hot.
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Asked by
Latrobe, CA
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
August 15, 2016
Answer: 
It only circulates water that is already part of the hot water system, so whatever is hot will continue to be hot, whatever is cold will continue to be cold.
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Asked by
Mound City, Ks
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
August 14, 2016
Answer: 
That depends. Where is your toilet in the water loop compared to where the sensing valve is located. Say your toilet is on the cold water line within say 10 foot of the water sensor then yes it might. The quantity of hot water in the cold like is not great. You should have cold water within a very short time. The quantity of water used in the toilet is enough to get mostly cold water.
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Customer Reviews

Rated 4.3 out of 5 by 225 reviewers.
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Works as expected Pump was well packed. Seems well made. Installing pump on top of water heater was easy. Installing valve under the sink was a bit harder due to difficulty of working under sink. However the hoses fit well and did not leak at all. Pump only uses 25 watts, I run it 16 hours per day. Cost for electricity for pump works out to be about $1.50 per month, not bad. You do get warm water on the cold side of your faucet where the special valve is installed. However, that does not happen at other sinks in the house. In my case, with the valve installed at the sink most distant from the water heater, it was a big help to the two bathrooms along the way. The only change in the pump I would recommend is the plastic cover on the timer tends to fall off easily, it needs a more positive way to attach. July 5, 2016
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Warmish water on demand Before installing the pump I had to run 2 to 3 gallons of cold water down my masterbath drain, waiting on warm water. Now I set the pump timer for my usual wakeup and bedtimes and warm water is available immediately. The water is not real hot but is warm enough for hand and face. I estimate I save over 100 gallons of water per month now. July 5, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Why wait? The fastest way to a hot shower. I heard about recirculating hot water systems years ago and assumed it was a "luxury" item that would cost thousands to upgrade my current plumbing. So, for the past 10 years, I lived with the fact that it took a long time for my shower to warm up. I would turn on my shower and then go do some other task, like make breakfast, cut the lawn, or watch a movie... and then, by the time I got back, it was nice and warm. Waiting for the water to warm up seemed like an eternity, like waiting for water to boil, or watching paint dry. Before installing this product, I timed how long it took for my shower to warm up. It took about a minute and 9 seconds. (I always assumed it was more like 5 minutes). After completing the installation, it only takes about 20 seconds... about the time it takes to disrobe. Not too bad. Highly recommend, not only for convenience and water savings, but to start each day without disdain. February 6, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by My Hot Water Recirculating system with built -in Timer Installation The hot water Recirculating System was very easy to install and functions excellent June 7, 2016
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Solves a big problem Our master bath is a long way from our hot water heater, and we'd have to run the shower for up to 5 minutes to get it up to temperature. When you install this pump, it forces the hot water to recirculate to the tap on a schedule you choose, so you have instant hot water. It works great, definitely as advertised, and very easy to install. The downside is that when the pump is running, it's really running, forcing the hot water heater to run more and this will drive up the gas bill. The trick is to schedule the windows when you want it to run as tightly as you can, but then expect to have to run the water more in the other times of day in order to get it hot. But at $200, it mostly solves a problem that we thought could only be solved with a $2000 tankless water heater. If you need hot water on demand at unpredictable times, it may be worth buying the tankless heater. A pump like this was recommended by "This Old House" as an alternative to the tankless heater. May 17, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Great buy! Hot water in the fartherest places from heater This was very easy to install, I'm seventy years of age and had the job done in forty-five minutes or so.We always had to run the water in the bathrooms for several minutes waiting for it to get hot. It is hot instantly now. May 3, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by This is a terrific product. Seems to work precisely as described. This product seems to work exactly as described. You will want to make sure that you have everything on hand that you need to install the pump quickly and get the hot water back on line. April 26, 2016
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by Don't need the pump. Valve alone works. Save $$$. I had installed this pump and valve a month ago. Put a thermal couple on the hot water copper pipe to monitor the temperature. As I was testing the system, I discovered, with the pump completely OFF, natural convection when the valve is open upstairs, will cause the water to recirculate naturally! It works by itself without the pump running on the hot water tank. The pump is actually quite useless as it doesn't seem to push up the temperature quickly. Sometimes it even pushes the temperature down. I am wondering if the pump was pumping backward. I figure I had a faulty pump. Exchanged one and yet to test the new one out. The bottom line is, this valve is a great product. Save yourself some money, don't buy the pump/valve combination, just the valve. You will get hot water (95F) naturally without any electricity cost!!! December 7, 2015
  • 2016-08-05 T23:47:47.830-05:00
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