Model # R4512

Internet #202500206

Store SKU #155225

RIDGID 13 Amp 10 in. Professional Cast Iron Table Saw
0648846052724

RIDGID

13 Amp 10 in. Professional Cast Iron Table Saw

  • 13 Amp motor delivers up to 3450 RPM
  • Cast iron table minimizes vibration
  • Backed by The RIDGID Lifetime Service Agreement
$549.00 /each

Frequently Bought Together

Product Overview

Rigid Hero
Feature 1

Get precise, smooth adjustments with front and back-clamping rip fence with extra-large glides

Feature 2

Makes a range of useful cuts - maximum cut depth of 2-1/4 in. at 45 degrees and 3-1/4 in. at 90 degrees

Feature 3

Easily reposition saw with single-action foot pedal

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Amperage

______________________________

13 amps

Specification Icon


rip capacity

______________________________

30 in.

Specification Icon


dado capacity

______________________________

13/16 in.

Specification Icon


Warranty

______________________________

LSA

WITH REGISTRATION

This RIDGID 10 in. Professional Table Saw features a powerful, 13 Amp motor for speeds up to 3450 RPM. The cast iron table's milled and polished surface minimizes vibration and provides a flat, level surface for trouble-free cutting. There is a blade guard for safety. Customize your table by adding an extension or auxiliary tables for routers or other specialty tools.

California residents: see   Proposition 65 information

  • 13 Amp motor delivers up to 3450 RPM to help you power through tough jobs
  • Front and back-clamping aluminum rip fence has extra-large glides to provide precise and smooth adjustments along the rail
  • Includes T-slots for the variable placement of accessories such as fences and sacrificial fences (not included)
  • Built-in accessory slots for installing auxiliary fences that support large work pieces
  • Customizable design so you can add an extension table or auxiliary tables (not included) for routers or other specialty tools
  • Die-cast mitre gauge with positive stops for accurate cuts
  • Built-in accessory storage keeps accessories nearby
  • Large over-mold handle provides a comfortable and secure grip
  • Single-action foot pedal helps you reposition the saw with ease
  • Maximum cut depth of 2-1/4 in. at 45-degree and 3-1/4 in. at 90-degrees for a variety of useful cuts
  • 3-year warranty and lifetime service agreement with tool registration
  • Blade guard for safety
  • Note: Product may vary by store; call to confirm brand/model # availability
  • Click Here to Register Your Product

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  • Click here for more information on Electronic Recycling Programs

Info & Guides

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Name 15 Amp 10 in. Heavy-Duty Portable Table Saw with Stand 13 Amp 10 in. Professional Cast Iron Table Saw 15 Amp 10 in. Job Site Table Saw with Rolling Stand 15 Amp Corded Electric 10 in. Worksite Table Saw with Gravity Rise Wheeled Stand
Brand RIDGID RIDGID DEWALT Bosch
Ratings (606) (527) (121) (59)
Power Tool Features Blade Guard System,Stand Included Stand Included Blade Guard System,Stand Included Blade Guard System,Stand Included
Blade Diameter 10 in 10 in 10 in 10 in
Rip Capacity - Right 25 in 30 in 32.5 in 25 in
Table Length (in.) 30.25 27 26.25 21
Table Width (in.) 21 20 22 29
Bench or Stationary Stationary Bench Stationary Bench
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189 Questions992 Answers

Customer Questions & Answers

13 Amp 10 in. Professional Cast Iron Table Saw
13 Amp 10 in. Professional Cast Iron Table Saw

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18 answers

What is the advantage to wiring the table saw for 240v rather then 120v?

This question is from 13 Amp 10 in. Professional Cast Iron Table Saw
Asked by
Sudbury Ontario canada
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December 27, 2013
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Answers (18)

Asked by
Katy, Tx
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
January 4, 2016
Answer: 
One aspect not addressed in all the other answers is startup time. SInce 220V draws half the amperage, the excess current draw at startup time doesn't slow it down. But in the 110V mode, it make take 4-5 seconds to get up to speed. The other aspect is when you load the saw down, and it draws more current, the line loss is higher for 110V operation so it slows down more.
I have wired my saw for 110 and
Read More
One aspect not addressed in all the other answers is startup time. SInce 220V draws half the amperage, the excess current draw at startup time doesn't slow it down. But in the 110V mode, it make take 4-5 seconds to get up to speed. The other aspect is when you load the saw down, and it draws more current, the line loss is higher for 110V operation so it slows down more.
I have wired my saw for 110 and 220 and 220 is far better (if you have it available)
Read Less
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Asked by
Minneapolis, MN
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
October 26, 2015
Answer: 
Contrary to common belief rewiring a motor for 220 volts DOES NOT make the motor more powerful. The only benefit is that the motor will run cooler because it consumes half of the amps at 220 volts as compared to amps consumed at 110 volts. Unless you understand OHMS LAW this is counter-intuitive but it is a fact. A cooler running motor lasts longer. If a saw is used primarily for hobby / home projects Read More
Contrary to common belief rewiring a motor for 220 volts DOES NOT make the motor more powerful. The only benefit is that the motor will run cooler because it consumes half of the amps at 220 volts as compared to amps consumed at 110 volts. Unless you understand OHMS LAW this is counter-intuitive but it is a fact. A cooler running motor lasts longer. If a saw is used primarily for hobby / home projects the heat generated by 110 volts is highly unlikely to noticeably affect the useful life of the saw. So, unless a 220 volt power source is already available the cost of installing it really doesn't make sense to the typical hobbyist / home user. If 220 volts is readily available it is the obvious choice. Read Less
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Asked by
Takoma Park, MD
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
July 16, 2015
Answer: 
Power is Volts X Current (amps). Power = Watts which is what your power (duh) company provides. Therefore, cutting the amps in half by going to 240 (double the voltage) is a wash with concern to power. Doesn't save you anything, but what others say about running cooler, I doubt it. Same power means same amount of heating.
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Asked by
Clifton Park, New York
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
May 25, 2015
Answer: 
Short answer... 230 volts uses less current and generates less heat on your saw's motor. Heat is not good for a motor's lifespan.
Your saw's motor needs a certain amount of Power in order to turn it's rotor and blade. Power is a combination of two things, voltage and current or amps. Power = Voltage x Current (amps). If you are using a 115 volt outlet and your amp rating/requirement for the motor is Read More
Short answer... 230 volts uses less current and generates less heat on your saw's motor. Heat is not good for a motor's lifespan.
Your saw's motor needs a certain amount of Power in order to turn it's rotor and blade. Power is a combination of two things, voltage and current or amps. Power = Voltage x Current (amps). If you are using a 115 volt outlet and your amp rating/requirement for the motor is 13amps (as stated on the box), your motor will need to be on (no less than) a 15 amp circuit breaker. Ideally, if you are using a 115 volt circuit, you will want the unit to be on a 20 amp circuit. This will help avoid tripping the circuit breaker due to excessive current draw as you put work through your saw. The more load you put on your saw, the more current it will draw through its motor windings (in order to make the rotor and blade turn). When you increase your saw's voltage to 230 volts, less current is needed to maintain the same amount of power. Look at the equation above. Again, if Voltage doubles from 115volts to 230 volts, you in essence can drop your current in half and still provide your saw the same amount of power that it requires. This drop in current/amps will expose your saw's motor to less heat on its windings and, thus, increase its lifespan. Less heat is very good for a motor. Read Less
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Asked by
Chicago
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January 25, 2014
Answer: 
Hi dapatch,
I'm glad you asked because there is often a lot of confusion around this topic. In short, there are probably only 2 advantages of converting to 240v that would ever apply to the average user.
1) If the table saw is located a far distance from the original breaker box (say, 150-200 ft+) a larger voltage will reduce the effects of something called voltage drop, a problem most common at Read More
Hi dapatch,
I'm glad you asked because there is often a lot of confusion around this topic. In short, there are probably only 2 advantages of converting to 240v that would ever apply to the average user.
1) If the table saw is located a far distance from the original breaker box (say, 150-200 ft+) a larger voltage will reduce the effects of something called voltage drop, a problem most common at start-up. If you trip a breaker and/or your saw if slow to get up to speed (in the first 2-5 seconds), then you might be experiencing this issue.
2) If you had an existing 120v circuit with 3 wires (+ ground) but the wires were too small to safely supply the power to the tool, you can convert it to 240v. It would then pull 50% less current through each wire thus allowing for safe use of the smaller wires. This can save you some install money, but only if you have the right number and type of wires to begin with.
Common misconceptions are that 240v will make your motor turn faster, generate more power, or consume less electricity and save money. These are all myths.
If you find you trip the breaker often, then 240v might be the answer for you. But a properly sized 120v circuit should rarely give you a problem.
Hope this helps and best of luck!
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Asked by
Henderson, NV, USA
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January 24, 2014
Answer: 
None, really. The saw works quite well at 110.
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Asked by
Drummond Island, Michigan
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
January 24, 2014
Answer: 
It's cheaper to run at 220v then 120v.
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Asked by
Read all my Q&A
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
January 24, 2014
Answer: 
The response above that states running on 240v will save money on electricity is incorrect. Power companies bill by killowatt/hours. The saw will consume nearly the same wattage whether it's run on 120v or 240v.
It's very possible to see an improvement in performance by switching to 240v if the 120v is not up to par, which is not uncommon. That improvement varies with each circuit. In theory, a good Read More
The response above that states running on 240v will save money on electricity is incorrect. Power companies bill by killowatt/hours. The saw will consume nearly the same wattage whether it's run on 120v or 240v.
It's very possible to see an improvement in performance by switching to 240v if the 120v is not up to par, which is not uncommon. That improvement varies with each circuit. In theory, a good 120v circuit will provide the same results, but in the real world, voltage loss is pretty common, and is remedied by a 240v circuit or an adequate 120v circuit. 240v will nearly always handle the amperage peaks better because it's never as close to it's max capacity, and is actually less expensive to wire for. If you have 240v readily available, switching is feasible. If you don't have 240v, it may not be worth pursuing unless you have overload issues, or are going to run new wire anyway. Read Less
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Asked by
Michigan
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January 24, 2014
Answer: 
I don't think this saw will convert to 220v and the motor is not accessible if is..
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Asked by
Carol Stream , IL, USA
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January 23, 2014
Answer: 
Higher voltage means lower amperage. That saves you money.
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Asked by
Read all my Q&A
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
January 23, 2014
Answer: 
I run this table saw at 120v, but I believe rewiring for 240v would draw less power (half the amps) and would be easier on the motor, leading to longer motor life.
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Asked by
Marietta, GA, USA
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January 23, 2014
Answer: 
NO real advantage. Supposedly it will make the saw run stronger and cooler but there is debate over this issue.
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Asked by
Marietta, GA, USA
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January 23, 2014
Answer: 
Supposedly the saw will run better at 240V than 110V but as long as you are not running multiple tools on the same circuit, or using a long extension cord, 110V should perform basically the same.
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Asked by
Read all my Q&A
January 23, 2014
Answer: 
220v divides the amperage across two hot leads, vs one, which in turn balances out the load on your electrical box, reduces voltage loss and overload of the circuit, and allows for smaller gauge wire. Avoiding voltage loss also tends to keep the motor cooler. Many claim that not starving the saw for amperage makes it start and recover more quickly, but it depends a great deal on your particular circuit. Read More
220v divides the amperage across two hot leads, vs one, which in turn balances out the load on your electrical box, reduces voltage loss and overload of the circuit, and allows for smaller gauge wire. Avoiding voltage loss also tends to keep the motor cooler. Many claim that not starving the saw for amperage makes it start and recover more quickly, but it depends a great deal on your particular circuit. Worth doing if you have 220 readily available..... Read Less
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Asked by
Tracy, CA, USA
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January 14, 2014
Answer: 
The saw will run more efficiently and it will use less energy. If you run the saw enough you'll notice a difference in your PG&E bill if you run the saw on 240v rather than 120v, but you might not have a 240v outlet in your home/workplace. If you don't you'll have to get an electrician out there to put one in. It's better to run the saw on 240v, but you shouldn't see much of a difference in overall Read More
The saw will run more efficiently and it will use less energy. If you run the saw enough you'll notice a difference in your PG&E bill if you run the saw on 240v rather than 120v, but you might not have a 240v outlet in your home/workplace. If you don't you'll have to get an electrician out there to put one in. It's better to run the saw on 240v, but you shouldn't see much of a difference in overall performance one way or the other. Read Less
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Asked by
Anonymous
Las Cruces, NM
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
January 10, 2014
Answer: 
I am about to have mine rewired for 240v. It is my understanding that by doing that there is less strain put on the motor which should increase power and lengthen the life of the motor.
If anyone knows that I am incorrect here, please post a comment & let me know what I have wrong.
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Asked by
Annapolis, Md
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January 4, 2014
Answer: 
I'm sure there is an electrical engineer out there that can give you a more technically accurate answer related to the power delivery and loss coefficient over wires as you switch from 120v to 240v. But I'll give it a shot.
A motor running at a twice the voltage will essentially use half the current (amps) to deliver the same power (Power=Volts x Amps). The decrease in amperage when using 240v causes Read More
I'm sure there is an electrical engineer out there that can give you a more technically accurate answer related to the power delivery and loss coefficient over wires as you switch from 120v to 240v. But I'll give it a shot.
A motor running at a twice the voltage will essentially use half the current (amps) to deliver the same power (Power=Volts x Amps). The decrease in amperage when using 240v causes less "loss' over the wires since the current is less by 1/2 even the though the total power is the same. Less current also cause less heat. Heat is generally bad for motors.
From a more practical perspective,,, when I switched my saw (not this model) from 120v to 240v, I immediately noticed a faster start-up and less "lugging" with thick hardwoods (especially in very cold weather as my saw in is the garage and I drag it outdoors for cuts).
Note that it will cost you some bucks to make the switch... unless you already have a 240v receptacle and a 240v plug/wire assembly for the saw. I'm guessing parts will cost you maybe $75-$125; and probably another $100-$250 for an electrician to put in the receptacle if you aren't comfortable working with 240v wiring.
Note that 240v receptacles and plugs are different based on the current delivery capability. Meaning a 20amp setup plugs/receptacles are different than a 30amp. So if you already have a receptacle be sure you either take a picture of the receptacle or looking carefully for the amp rating on the receptacle before you buy the necessary plug.
I'm sure others will have a different opinion but if practical for other reasons, I believe 240v will always perform "better" then 120v. Whether you need that additional "bang" is dependent on how you use your tool. Read Less
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Asked by
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December 30, 2013
Answer: 
Wiring the saws motor to run on 240V verses 120V allows the motor to run cooler. That is the only real advantage.
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12 answers

does this saw come with a blade?

This question is from 13 Amp 10 in. Professional Cast Iron Table Saw
Asked by
mmccutc01
brenham tx
June 13, 2013
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Answers (12)

Asked by
Read all my Q&A
January 23, 2014
Answer: 
Yes, but buy a better one to optimize your investment....keep the stock blade for cutting construction stuff and junk wood. Infinity, Forrest, Ridge Carbide, Freud, Freud Diablo, CMT, Marples, Tenryu....all are much better blades.
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Asked by
Rockville, MD, USA
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September 11, 2013
Answer: 
Off course, are you kidding!!!.And it's a piece of garbage. Get a good blade.
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Asked by
va
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September 5, 2013
Answer: 
Yes. But only good for rough cutting.
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Asked by
Wilton, CT, USA
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August 28, 2013
Answer: 
Yes. A mid-grade thin-kerf ripping blade with the Ridgid brand on it.
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Asked by
Drummond Island, Michigan
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August 10, 2013
Answer: 
Yes
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Asked by
Agawam, MA, USA
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July 1, 2013
Answer: 
Yes, a 40 tooth (terrible quality) blade is included
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Asked by
Middletown, CT, USA
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June 17, 2013
Answer: 
yes a blade is attached to the side cabinet
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Asked by
Clarkston, MI 48346, USA
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June 14, 2013
Answer: 
Yes, this saw comes with a 10" carbide tipped Combination (Ripping and Crosscut) blade. Same brand as the saw.
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Asked by
Huntsville, AL, USA
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June 14, 2013
Answer: 
Yes, the saw comes with a 40 tooth rip/crosscut combo blade. The saw is awesome, but the blade it comes with is not the greatest. It works, but to get the best from the saw, you'll want to expand your blade collection. Freund Diablo blades are much better, and reasonably priced at Home Depot. If you want tip-top preformance, check out the Forrest Woodworker. Pricey, but gives you true professional Read More
Yes, the saw comes with a 40 tooth rip/crosscut combo blade. The saw is awesome, but the blade it comes with is not the greatest. It works, but to get the best from the saw, you'll want to expand your blade collection. Freund Diablo blades are much better, and reasonably priced at Home Depot. If you want tip-top preformance, check out the Forrest Woodworker. Pricey, but gives you true professional results. Read Less
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Asked by
NC
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June 14, 2013
Answer: 
Yes it comes with a blade
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Asked by
New Mexico, USA
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June 14, 2013
Answer: 
Yes, the saw comes with a carbide tipped blade
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Asked by
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June 14, 2013
Answer: 
Yes
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11 answers

Does the Riving knife travel with the blade up and down?

This question is from 13 Amp 10 in. Professional Cast Iron Table Saw
Asked by
portland
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December 19, 2013
It mentioned a Riving knife! its useless unless is moving with the blade
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Answers (11)

Asked by
Agawam, MA, USA
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February 20, 2014
Answer: 
Yes. It's a true riving knife; not a splitter
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Asked by
Denver Colorado
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February 4, 2014
Answer: 
It does move up and down with the blade.
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Asked by
Memphis, TN, USA
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January 25, 2014
Answer: 
Yes, the riving knife travels up and down with the blade.
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Asked by
Michigan
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January 24, 2014
Answer: 
Yes.
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January 23, 2014
Answer: 
Yes, the riving knife moves in exact correspondence to the blade.
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Asked by
Marietta, GA, USA
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January 23, 2014
Answer: 
Yes
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Asked by
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January 23, 2014
Answer: 
That's what separates a riving knife from a splitter....
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Asked by
Tracy, CA, USA
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January 14, 2014
Answer: 
Yes, the riving knife moves up and down with the blade.
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Asked by
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January 10, 2014
Answer: 
It moves up and down with the blade. In addition it has 2 positions up for thru cuts and down for non-thru cuts. Works very well....
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Asked by
Anonymous
Las Cruces, NM
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
January 10, 2014
Answer: 
Yes. It absolutely travels with the blade.
It can be used in 1 of 2 methods also.
1 - for through cuts (high) and
2 - for non-through cuts (low).
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Asked by
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December 20, 2013
Answer: 
Yes, the RIDGID R4512 table saws riving knife travels up and down with the blade as the blade is raised or lowered.
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11 answers

Do the screws hold the throat plate in place?

This question is from 13 Amp 10 in. Professional Cast Iron Table Saw
Asked by
Read all my Q&A
December 14, 2013
Probably seems like a dumb question but I am a rookie with this stuff. It seems obvious that the screws would hold it in place but once I did it it did not look right. Did not make sense to me that the screws weren't flush with the plate. And the assembly instructions never mention screws so I am thinking that the screws stay in the holes underneath the throat plate and throat plat simply slides into its slot?
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Answers (11)

Asked by
Agawam, MA, USA
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February 20, 2014
Answer: 
The screws are to level the plate. The plate is held down with magnets and a latch in the rear
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Asked by
Denver Colorado
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February 4, 2014
Answer: 
The throat plate sits on top of the adjustment screws. It is secured by small magnets and a single metal hook on the one end.
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Asked by
Memphis, TN, USA
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January 25, 2014
Answer: 
No. The throat plate is held in place by gravity and a small lip at the rear that fits under the table top. The screws go directly into the holes in the metal tabs under the throat plate and are adjusted from above after inserting the plate to properly level the plate.
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Asked by
Henderson
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
January 24, 2014
Answer: 
No, they simply are to adjust the plate so it will be flush with the table. The plate has a tab on the underside to prevent it from flipping out.
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Asked by
Michigan
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January 24, 2014
Answer: 
The answer is yes; however the cheep screws were too proud and caught the wood sliding across the table or scratched the wood. I replaced them with a better screw and took a counter sink and made them flush. I got the screws as hardware and they are stainless steel and cannot be recovered with a magnet. p.s. Buy extra screws as they fall or are knocked into the slot
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Asked by
Marietta, GA, USA
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January 23, 2014
Answer: 
The plate is held in place by magnets and gravity. The screws are meant to sit UNDER the plate and can be adjusted THROUGH the plate holes to level the top of the plate with the top of the table.
Do not remove the screws and put them through the top of the plate, this will only serve to create a potentially hazardous condition where your work piece could snag on an exposed screw head, or scratch your Read More
The plate is held in place by magnets and gravity. The screws are meant to sit UNDER the plate and can be adjusted THROUGH the plate holes to level the top of the plate with the top of the table.
Do not remove the screws and put them through the top of the plate, this will only serve to create a potentially hazardous condition where your work piece could snag on an exposed screw head, or scratch your work piece as it passes over the screw head. Read Less
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Asked by
Tracy, CA, USA
Read all my Q&A
January 14, 2014
Answer: 
You don't need to do anything with the screws. Just slip the throat plate into the slot. It should fit flush. I'd also recommend that you purchase an after market "zero tolerance" throat plate so that your work is well supported on each side of the blade. The stock throat plate is usable and will allow for all cuts at every bevel angle you need, but for straight 90 degree cuts (most of the cuts you'll Read More
You don't need to do anything with the screws. Just slip the throat plate into the slot. It should fit flush. I'd also recommend that you purchase an after market "zero tolerance" throat plate so that your work is well supported on each side of the blade. The stock throat plate is usable and will allow for all cuts at every bevel angle you need, but for straight 90 degree cuts (most of the cuts you'll make) a zero tolerance throat plate is best. They sell them on Amazon for $26.99. Read Less
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Asked by
Read all my Q&A
January 10, 2014
Answer: 
The screws go under the throat plate and act like set screws to adjust the height. The throat plate is held in place via a magnet and an extension.
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Asked by
Anonymous
Las Cruces, NM
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
January 10, 2014
Answer: 
No, not exactly. The screws are raised and or lowered to level the plate. The plate would effectively sit on top of the screw heads. But the screws are adjustable through the plate or zero clearance insert.
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Asked by
Chicago
Read all my Q&A
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
December 29, 2013
Answer: 
Hi Rook,
On mine (purchased in 2005) there is a tab that slips under the rim and one countersunk screw on the opposite end that holds the plate down. The throat plate is rather thick and substantial and very flat. I have no fear of it warping or coming loose...though always make sure you have it secured to the table to the table.
Hope this helps! Happy woodworking!
TTM
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Asked by
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December 16, 2013
Answer: 
The throat plate is supposed to rest in the table opening, and the screws are to be adjusted to raise, lower, level the throat plate with the table surface. The rear tab on the underside of the throat plate and the magnet in the front of the opening in the table, serve to secure and hold the throat plate in place.
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Customer Reviews

Rated 4.4 out of 5 by 514 reviewers.
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Good Table Saw I couldn't wait to get rid of my old table saw from the 70's back when safety wasn't even thought of. None of the near by HomeDepot had the table saw in stock and the closest one to me was a little over a hundred miles. It would cost the same in my travel expense as the shipping. The freight company HomeDepot chose was awful. PRO number kept coming up as an error and once it worked it said it was delivered but i had not received my new table saw. Basically just drive and pickup you purchase. Ridgid lived up to its claim. Even tried the nickel test, and it worked great. If you purchases this table saw have someone help with the assembly, it was hard to stand up. August 2, 2016
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by Cheap. Poor'ish Craftsmanship. Poor Quality Control. Great for Amateurs. NOT a Pro Tool. First one had blade shift/alignment issues as-apparently-a result of faulty trunnions, which resulted in blade heel/parallel issues. After much calibration and frustration and the constant smell of burning wood and binding, I decided to try again. Got a new saw. Where to start? 1. The entire table surface is uneven. Unfixable. 2. They changed the caster system to a 3 caster instead of 4. This was a stupendously stupid move. They are horrible now. Why strip the saw of a great feature? Cost? Why not focus instead on the unreliable fence and rails instead? 3. This one has blade shift issues too. Not horrible, but we'll see. 4. Also this one has heel/parallel issues when beveling. This could be a deal-breaker. 5. Miter gauge won't fit in the miter gauge holder-thingy on the side. 6. The rail-spreader is crooked. 7. The saw slams down when lowering it using the casters. Quality control is lacking. I'd pay $100 more for this same saw with the above items fixed, including an upgraded fence/rails. In Ridgid's defense, their customer care is good. LSA is good. I see what they're trying to do with this saw, and they're close. Just fix the imperfections and I'll be happy. September 1, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by My New Baby The saw was fairly easy to assemble following the instructions carefully. There are also u-tubes by other users that are helpful. It took me about 4 hours and 6 beers to put it together. The saw is amazingly quiet and makes smooth and accurate cuts. I am very pleased with my purchase. The rip fence slides smoothly across the table and is conveniently stored on the side of the saw in racks designed for that purpose. The same goes for the miter gauge. July 27, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by HD staff very helpful and accommodating The store display unit and box cover image for the R4512 showed a 4 caster lift on this table saw (which I really wanted). After opening the box I found the "new improved" lift with two fixed wheels and only one caster. I contacted the store and described the situation and was first told to return the 260 lb. beast and if I wanted I could take the display unit. I suggested it would be much easier for me to remove 8 screws and swap out the lift assembly on the display unit. Joe from HD said sure and agreed that the display should match what the customer purchased. It took 10 minutes to complete and now I have what I really wanted, BTW ... I love this table saw. October 11, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by I love this new saw. The guide was square out of the box, I only had to make minor adjustments to the placement markers. Even the blade was in alignment and I have not had any of the reported issues with the saw. The only down side is the single caster and 2 static rear legs. I understand that occasionally choices are made to make a product more cost effective but still its a really bit difference between 4 casters and this setup. Still its not enough of a problem to take away from the fact that the saw does everything I need. October 25, 2016
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Nice Saw,. After setup and alignment it makes very good straight cuts. Takes time to set up right. July 19, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Great table saw at a reasonable price. I am new to wood working and looked around at different brands/models for quite some time. I wanted something that would be safe, warrantied, semi-mobile, reasonably priced,and versatile. Another criteria that was important to me was that the capability of the saw would not limit the quality and workmanship of the items I produce. In other words, I wanted the limiting factor in my work to be me, not the saw. After careful consideration of many types, sizes, and brands of saws I decided the R4512 fit my requirements best. After purchasing the saw, it took me about 4 hours to carefully put it together. The instructions are great. One of the takeaways I learned was to ensure you have a reasonably fit partner to help you load, unload, and assemble this saw. I did it myself but it would have been exponentially easier to do with a helper. Also, while putting this saw together, you will have the option of installing a dust chute. Give this option careful consideration, if you choose not to install the dust chute at this point, it will take considerable work if you change your mind in the future and decide to install it. The saw blade was aligned almost perfectly out of the box. I did make a tiny adjustment to it, but the adjustment is easy and intuitive. I have a very limited work space, so I love how mobile the saw is. When I need it, I easily wheel it into position and when my work is complete, I wheel it back to its storage location. I am excited about the empty extension wing and plan to build an insert for a router station into it. Youtube has many videos showing how to do this. The Lifetime Service Agreement (LSA) through Ridgid was the ultimate factor that made me go with this product. My portion of the online registration process took about 5 minutes and was easy. However, it took two weeks for Ridgid to approve the LSA. No big deal, just be prepared to wait a little bit after you make the online submission. YOU MUST BE THE ORIGINAL OWNER AND GO THROUGH THE REGISTRATION PROCESS to be covered by the LSA. Without the LSA, your Ridgid product has a three year warranty. I hope I never have to exercise the LSA on this saw, it weighs close to 300 pounds and the closest Ridgid service center is about 90 miles away. However, I do sleep better knowing that in the event there is a problem years down the road, I am covered by the LSA. Finally a word of caution about the cast Iron surface on this saw. Once setup, I stripped all the oil off the surface of the saw and had to leave it for about 12 hours. When I returned, surface rust had already started to form on the exposed cast iron (see photo). I was able to quickly clean this up and fix the problem by applying several layers of paste wax on the surface. This is not a fault of the saw, down here in humid Gulfport, MS any exposed cast iron with do the same thing, I just wanted to make anyone reading this aware of the potential for rust. July 18, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by I couldn't be happier Some of those negative reviews don't look like they're reviewing the same saw I just brought home last week. Sure I had to put on my big boy britches and take time to align the fence rails. I expect to spend time assembling and calibrating my tools. The fence is pretty darn accurate, I'd say within hundredth's of an inch right out of the box. My table appears perfectly flat. The blade is dead on perpendicular to the table up and down and the heel seems parallel to the miter slots. I haven't pulled out the digital micrometer yet, so far it doesn't seem necessary. Maybe when I start trying to produce some fine jewelry boxes I'll go to that extreme. September 8, 2016
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