0785901008729

Square D

Model # HEPD80

Internet # 203540660

Store SKU # 1001519416

Home Electronics Protective Device (HEPD)

$82.20 /each
  • Provides surge suppression at residential load centers
  • Protects from internal and external surges in home load centers
  • Installation for indoors or outdoors

Frequently Bought Together

Product Overview

Square D brand Home Electronics Protective Devices (HEPDs) are compact and affordable surge suppressors designed for residential load centers. HEPDs work together with surge protection plug strips to provide surge suppression for sensitive electronics. HEPDs reduce surges that might otherwise overwhelm plug strips and damage connected household equipment. HEPDs also provide surge suppression for important items such as washers, dryers, refrigerators, stoves, and air conditioning that plug strips may not or cannot protect.

  • 80,000 Amp/phase maximum surge current
  • LED status indicators
  • Industry leading design and product testing
  • 120/240 VAC applications
  • UL 1449 3rd edition listed
  • NEMA type 4X rated
  • 5-year, $50,000 limited warranty
  • Square D Home Electronics Protective Device (HEPD) Features:


Info & Guides

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Specifications

Dimensions

Product Depth (in.) 
2.7 
Product Height (in.) 
3.7 
Product Width (in.) 
3.6 

Details

Connection type 
Panel Mount 
Electrical Product Type 
Whole House Surge Protectors 
Joules 
3300 
Maximum Amperage (amps) 
80000 
Product Weight (lb.) 
1.6 lb 
Returnable 
90-Day 

Warranty / Certifications

Certifications and Listings 
1-UL Listed,ANSI Certified 
Manufacturer Warranty 
5 years, $50,000, limited 

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Customer Questions & Answers

23 Questions61 Answers

Customer Questions & Answers

Home Electronics Protective Device (HEPD)
Home Electronics Protective Device (HEPD)

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6 answers

Can this be wired to an existing 20 amp breaker(s), or does it need its own dedicated breaker(s)?

This question is from Home Electronics Protective Device (HEPD)
Asked by
Macedon, NY
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November 27, 2014
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Answers (6)

Asked by
Atlanta
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Home Improvement Profile: Other
March 10, 2016
Answer: 
Square D QO and Homeline 2 Pole breakers from 15-30 Amp are approved to have 2 wires connected to each termination side. They are designed that way for attaching a surge protection device to an already dedicated breaker such as one being used for an AC unit. You can clearly see the 2 wires per side option on those breakers. At 2P 35A and higher you can no longer terminate 2 wires to each side. You also Read More
Square D QO and Homeline 2 Pole breakers from 15-30 Amp are approved to have 2 wires connected to each termination side. They are designed that way for attaching a surge protection device to an already dedicated breaker such as one being used for an AC unit. You can clearly see the 2 wires per side option on those breakers. At 2P 35A and higher you can no longer terminate 2 wires to each side. You also can't do this on any other manufactures breakers as none of them are rated to handle 2 wires like the low amperage Square D 2 poles. So, using any other brand panel would cause the need for an extra 2P breaker just to terminate the SPD. Read Less
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Asked by
Mobile AL
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
December 2, 2015
Answer: 
Dedicated breakers are recommended by the manufacturer. It is not code-worthy to double up on a breaker utilization.
I ended up purchasing a SquareD QO20303020 to free up a breaker slot. Unfortunately the tandem breaker cost more than the HEPD!
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Asked by
Lake Jackson, TX
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
January 8, 2015
Answer: 
use existing breakers is fine
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December 1, 2014
Answer: 
It needs a dedicated breaker.
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November 30, 2014
Answer: 
Dedicated, so that a breaker tripping on a regular circult does not disable your protection. I believe it also recommends placing it as close to the main breaker as possible (in front of any other breakers).
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Asked by
South Milwaukee, WI, USA
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
November 30, 2014
Answer: 
It is better to have it on ots own 2-pole breaker. But if you can not do that, then you can hook it to an existing 2-pole breaker. If you have an electric dryer, hook it to that 30A 2-pole breaker. Do not hook it to 2 single pole breakers. That is a safety hazard, because you could end up with power on the load side of the breaker even after you turn it off. Also, it is harder to make sure you get one Read More
It is better to have it on ots own 2-pole breaker. But if you can not do that, then you can hook it to an existing 2-pole breaker. If you have an electric dryer, hook it to that 30A 2-pole breaker. Do not hook it to 2 single pole breakers. That is a safety hazard, because you could end up with power on the load side of the breaker even after you turn it off. Also, it is harder to make sure you get one leg on each hot leg when you hook to single pole breakers. If you hook both hot wires from the unit to the same leg, you will not get full protection. Read Less
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6 answers

will this protect both side of the panel

This question is from Home Electronics Protective Device (HEPD)
Asked by
hartland mi.
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November 24, 2014
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Answers (6)

Asked by
Mobile AL
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
December 2, 2015
Answer: 
Yes. This unit has 4 wires - connects to both sides of the panel, ground and neutral.
User submitted photo
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Asked by
Northern Missouri
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
November 27, 2015
Answer: 
Will work on both 120V legs of the the breaker box, but be sure to use a 20Amp breaker for each hot leg of the HEPD.
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Asked by
Lake Jackson, TX
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
January 8, 2015
Answer: 
yes
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November 30, 2014
Answer: 
Yes it needs a double pole breaker connection.
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Asked by
South Milwaukee, WI, USA
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
November 30, 2014
Answer: 
As long as you hook it to a 2-pone breaker, it will protect both sides of the panel.
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Asked by
Orange,Calfornia
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
November 26, 2014
Answer: 
This is a whole house surge protector, which means that this will indeed protect both sides of the panel, and any sub-panel it is tied in with, if done correctly.
Joseph
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5 answers

Does this unit work on a three phase system for the whole house???

This question is from Home Electronics Protective Device (HEPD)
Asked by
Mexico
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July 14, 2014
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Answers (5)

Asked by
New York
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
March 1, 2016
Answer: 
You would have to wire it as the instructions show. Using a 220 volt two pole breaker making sure you're not grabbing the 240 volt hot leg that you would have in a three phase panel. Mostly found in a commercial building only.
However if indeed you're on a three phase anything connected on the third leg will not be protected.
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Asked by
Lake Jackson, TX
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
January 8, 2015
Answer: 
For 3 phase, I expect you would need a separate device on each phase. I am not qualified to answer that question. Are you sure you have 3 phase going to your house, that is very unusual?
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Asked by
South Milwaukee, WI, USA
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
September 26, 2014
Answer: 
It depends on what you mean by a three phase system. It is unusual to find a three phase system in a house. But sometimes people mistakenly call as 115/230 volt single phase system a three phase system.
If the main breaker has three wires going to it, then it is a three phase system, and you would need at least two of these to protect the house. I would recommend getting an electrician to install Read More
It depends on what you mean by a three phase system. It is unusual to find a three phase system in a house. But sometimes people mistakenly call as 115/230 volt single phase system a three phase system.
If the main breaker has three wires going to it, then it is a three phase system, and you would need at least two of these to protect the house. I would recommend getting an electrician to install it.
If you have two wires connected to the main breaker, and a white wire connected to the neutral bus, then you have a single phase, 115/230 volt system. This is what the unit is designed for. Read Less
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Asked by
Naples, FL, USA
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
July 16, 2014
Answer: 
The HEPD is a single phase device. Most homes now have Line to line at 240VAC and line to neutal (ground) 120VAc. The 240VAC is single phase. The device has 3 wires. Blacks connected to the incoming 240VAC . Green connected to the neitral or Ground.
It is rare that a home is connected to a 3 phase supply in the US.
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July 15, 2014
Answer: 
No, but it would be pretty rare to have three phase in a house.
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4 answers

Subpanel question

This question is from Home Electronics Protective Device (HEPD)
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September 24, 2014
Installing a subpanel in a new workshop. Is it ok to install in that new subpanel, or should it only be installed in the main panel?
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Asked by
Mobile AL
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
December 2, 2015
Answer: 
Only install in the main panel. You want it as close to the electrical feed as possible.
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Asked by
Lake Jackson, TX
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
January 8, 2015
Answer: 
It would be good for protecting equipment supplied by the subpanel.
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September 27, 2014
Answer: 
You could install it there in the subpanel, but ideally it is installed as close to the power feed as possible in order to be 'in front of' the surge which you are in theory protecting from the outside in. So, it will likely only protect the devices effectively in the subpanel if you install it there.
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Asked by
South Milwaukee, WI, USA
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Home Improvement Profile: Professional
September 26, 2014
Answer: 
It is OK to install it in a sub-panel. It will not offer the same level of protection that it would in the main panel. The ideal location is as close to the main breaker as possible. One thing to be aware of when installing a sub-panel is that the groung and neutral are NOT bonded together. This means that you can not tye ground wires to the neutral bar. You need to install a separate ground bar. If the Read More
It is OK to install it in a sub-panel. It will not offer the same level of protection that it would in the main panel. The ideal location is as close to the main breaker as possible. One thing to be aware of when installing a sub-panel is that the groung and neutral are NOT bonded together. This means that you can not tye ground wires to the neutral bar. You need to install a separate ground bar. If the sub-panel cones with a screw that bonds the neutral bar to the metal case of the panel, you must not install it, or you must remove it if it is installed. See the directions that come with the panel for more information about this. Read Less
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Customer Reviews

Rated 4.7 out of 5 by 72 reviewers.
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by HEPD80 surge protector I actually purchased this in December when HD had them on sale for $76., which was a great deal. It is now early Feb. and I just my electrician to install it. He pulled 2 circuit breakers (unused) and installed a 20A double pole dedicated CB. I wanted a licensed electrician to do the job, since Schneider will cover you should a surge get through. See the 2 green lights, when they take a hit, they will go red and the unit will probably have to be replaced. In talking with the electrician, he has installed quite a few, and they do work. Just some peace of mind with all the expensive electronics that are plugged in. February 10, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Very easy to install. Why these are not code is beyond me. Either a must have and super easy to install. March 1, 2016
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by It works, but looks like it doesn't. The instructions say that when you install this thing you should see green lights on the front telling you it is working. The illustration shows nice bright green lights. But when I put it in I saw no lights, thought it was broken and returned it to the store. Later I did some research and found that the lights do go on but they are too dim to see in daylight. This is not satisfactory. June 18, 2016
Rated 2.0 out of 5.0 by whole house surge protector the main problem so far with this device is that the L E D indicator are so dim that you have to cover the area with your hand and peek in to see if the device is O.K. on the instructions it is shown as bright LED brightly displaying its status but that was not the case. I did wire the unit correctly using a two pole 20 amp circuit breaker. It is really difficult at a glance to know it's status June 24, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Surge protector Works well! Installs easy and provides whole house protection. June 7, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by easy install... I would only know the results if lighting strikes (-: Simple install with new breaker .... light is lit green and hoping that it would do what it design to do... June 7, 2016
Rated 2.0 out of 5.0 by Fatal flaw When It takes a hit it will stop the initial surge. However when it fails, (as it was designed to), it allows the current to flow through it, like the old surge protectors. So if you are in a lightning storm, and the power lines get hit twice within a few minutes, your stuff is toast. June 2, 2016
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Works well - think about mounting options first. Installs easily, and is outdoor rated which was a plus for me. Think through your mounting options before mounting. In my case I mounted it on the bottom of the outdoor load center, and in the front row of knockouts. Only after testing did I realize that it blocks the door from closing properly as it sits flush against the bottom. I ended up putting two metal washers on the top to drop it down a bit so the door can close properly. Secondly I mounted it on the far left side of the load center, and found the neutral wire was *just barely* long enough to reach the neutral binding post. Works fine but the wiring isn't as neat as I had hoped. Since my load center was already full, I purchased a SquareD QO20303020 tandem breaker. This allowed me to remove a 30a 220v breaker and provide the combination 20A 2 pole for the HEPD and 30A that I was replacing. See the pictures for more information. Moral of the story - on a load center with a door, it should be mounted in the center on the rear row of knockouts. December 2, 2015
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