Model # IM 4000

Internet #202672114

Store SKU #468318

null Tumbling Composter with Two Chambers for Efficient Batch Composting
0628344138847

Tumbling Composter with Two Chambers for Efficient Batch Composting

  • Made from durable u.v. resistant plastic
  • Space efficient size
  • Adjustable air vents
$99.97 /each

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Product Overview

This unique tumbling composter features two chambers fill one side, while the other side cures, making it easy to efficiently convert your kitchen and yard waste into rich soil enhancing compost. Just load it up, close the sliding door and use the convenient built- in hand holds to give it a turn every couple days and see how it produces finished compost in weeks. The tumbling composter is made with recycled, uv inhibited, black plastic which absorbs heat and is designed to be rodent-proof. Help divert waste from landfill or costly processing and turn your own organic waste into compost in your own backyard.

  • Easy turn barrel with convenient built- in hand holds
  • Made from durable, u.v. resistant plastic with recycled content and includes a strong steel frame, which will last for many years
  • Adjustable air vents
  • Rodent resistant
  • Space efficient size with 5 cu. ft. or 140 litre capacity
  • Made in North America

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Customer Questions & Answers

Tumbling Composter with Two Chambers for Efficient Batch Composting
Tumbling Composter with Two Chambers for Efficient Batch Composting

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7 answers

I would like to know if the chambers are able to be disassembled, such to carry it easily. The containers seem to be too big .

This question is from Tumbling Composter with Two Chambers for Efficient Batch Composting
Asked by
Argentina
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October 3, 2014
Could you please send some photos of a composter not assembled?
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Answers (7)

Asked by
Fayetteville, Arkansas
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October 8, 2016
Answer: 
The chambers can be disassembled, but it's very time consuming... and then you'll have to assemble it again, which is no quick task. If you're transporting the unit, your best bet is just to take the legs off and move the whole thing.
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Asked by
El Dorado, AR
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Home Improvement Profile: Other
June 22, 2015
Answer: 
You just unscrew the entire composter. - but then you have to reassemble to use.
I'm a 63-yr old female 5'6" - and yes, awkward to carry but I did it.
I figured it out & put it together in the house then took it outside.
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Asked by
Seattle, WA
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June 1, 2015
Answer: 
Unit is light enough for one person to carry empty; handles built in. Basically one piece once assembled (although door can be easily removed), would not want to take it apart to move.
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Asked by
I.E. California
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March 26, 2015
Answer: 
The composter is one part and not too heavy to pick up and move around. Can even drag if you need to.
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Asked by
peru,in
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February 3, 2015
Answer: 
i assembled indoors, carried outside alone. (other than my son holding the door.) light weight, just awkward, be easier if removed 2 bolts, removing tumbler from stand.
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Asked by
Washington, DC
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November 11, 2014
Answer: 
No the chambers cannot be disassembled. Actually, once you put it together and it sits outside for a while, the screws rust and you can't get them out.
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Asked by
Pittsburgh
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October 29, 2014
Answer: 
Chambers do not disassemble. To remove compost, open side that is finished composting, turn barrel
upside down and empty compost into a bucket or onto a tarp.
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5 answers

Can I compost cooked oat meal leftovers and cooked lentils? How can I check my compost is working?

This question is from Tumbling Composter with Two Chambers for Efficient Batch Composting
Asked by
Port Washington, NY
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March 16, 2016
Hello,

I have only had this since Sunday- for 3 days and I can see the compost is not happening. It is not heating up and it is starting to look like rotting food. I added dried leaves to the kitchen scraps. I also added the organic compost starter that I purchased. Please, any advice would be helpful. I need this to work! It is only attracting flies so far!
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Asked by
Columbus, OH
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Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
June 7, 2016
Answer: 
I hear you--composting is a skill requiring knowledge, patience & a learning curve. Found this and think is informative, comprehensive, but simple to use. Hope you feel the same. Good Luck!!
GENERAL The Tumbling Composter contains a mechanism with rods or fins that mixes and breaks up larger clusters to activate and accelerate the decomposing process. Such composters are able to reach a temperature of Read More
I hear you--composting is a skill requiring knowledge, patience & a learning curve. Found this and think is informative, comprehensive, but simple to use. Hope you feel the same. Good Luck!!
GENERAL The Tumbling Composter contains a mechanism with rods or fins that mixes and breaks up larger clusters to activate and accelerate the decomposing process. Such composters are able to reach a temperature of more than 140°. In order for compost to be efficient, it requires a correct mixture ratio of "brown" (carbon# and "green" #nitrogen# materials #see LIST OF KEY COMPONENTS FOR GREAT COMPOST#^ Water should be added only when necessary and the tumbler should be turned every other day or so to keep all ingredients, microorganisms, and moisture evenly distributed^ Within a few weeks, your Tumbling Composter will transform your scraps into this natural fertilizer named compost^
COMPOST CAN BE PRODUCED WITH YOUR TUMBLER IN TWO DIFFERENT PROCESSES: 1 The best method: Produce compost in batches, loading up the tumbler until full, and leave it to break down until completed^ When running two tumblers simultaneously, one can start adding waste to the second tumbler and wait for the first to complete its decomposing process^ Refraining from adding more materials to the current batch of working compost will ensure better results^ A batch with new waste materials can then be started when the first is completed^ 2^ Another method is continuous composting, where one adds more and more material, mixing fresh waste into the decomposing process^ When choosing this method with the tumbler, one should stop adding when it the tumbler is almost full, and leave the contents decompose^ Only after being completed can the process be started again^
LIST OF KEY COMPONENTS FOR GREAT COMPOST Decomposing Process – When trying the process for the first time, it may be surprising how many small creatures are participating in decomposition^ This mixture of creatures, which include many insects, bugs, slugs, bacteria, and mushrooms, form what is called a "food web^" Adding a small quantity of soil to this mixture can be used to start the process^ The creatures in the soil will actually contribute and speed up decomposition^ Each and every member of the food web has its own contribution to your compost and it must be left alone to do their job^ If any of the member organisms is removed by using agents such as pesticides, the natural cycle will be disturbed and the compost will be infected by pesticides^ Ingredients - Basic ingredients for composting are: nitrogen, carbon, water and air^ Water and air should be readily available^ Providing the remaining ingredients is somewhat more complicated^ They are actually referred to as "greens" and "browns"#not meaning the color but green = rich in nitrogen, and brown = rich in carbon#^ The "green" ingredients represent the protein for the active creatures, and the "brown" ingredients supplying the energy^ Any plant in your garden can be used to "feed" these creatures^ The tumbling composter should simply be filled with these ingredients and mixed^ Water must be added separately and the whole must be tumbled to add air^ The composter should then be left alone, to let the decomposing process take place^ Nitrogen / Carbon Ratio - The ideal mix is 3/4"brown" and 1/4"green" ingredients by volume^ Such a good mixture of "brown" and "green" ingredients will ensure for the mass to maintain the appropriate quantity of humidity and air, and fasten the decomposing process^ An increased amount of nitrogen will generate a heavy mass, which will slow down the decomposing process^ Then may be the right time to add more "brown" ingredients!
Nitrogen-"Green" ingredients range from lawn clippings, green leaves, manures to garden trimmings and are ideal sources of nitrogen for composting^ The same can be said of kitchen waste, such as vegetable and fruit leftovers, which also generate nitrogen^ Kitchen wastes are usually kept in a plastic container under the sink^ Before using them as ingredients for the composter, cut up the larger pieces before use^ Carbon - "Brown" garden ingredients such as dry leaves, twigs, or hay provide the carbon part of the mixture and will ensure a lighter and aerated compost^ Carbon is best provided by using dry leaves^ Dry leaves can be collected, shredded, and stored to be used all year round^ If the mixture gets too wet or contains too much nitrogen, add dry leaves^ #Refer to BASIC NITROGEN / CARBON CHART for more detailed information#^ Water - A common mistake during the composting process is neglecting humidity^ The compost should remain humid all along the process^ About 50% humidity is acceptable^ How can we make sure that such humidity is achieved? One can simply open the compost tumbler, grab and squeeze a handful of material in your hand; if a few drops of water are released, it is most probably humid enough, if not, water should be added by inserting a hose deep into the mixture so that not just the upper layer will get wet^ Let excess water drain out through the ventilation bores^ The mixture should remain humid, but not wet^ Air – All creatures and mushrooms in the compost mixture need oxygen during the process^ If the mixture is too dense or get too humid, the air supply into the mixture is prevented and the laboring creatures will probably be exterminated^ The process will slow down and a nauseating stink will start^ To prevent this and fasten the process, the tumbler must be rotated every second day or so^ This would also be a good time to add shredded leaves from the stock pile^ Preventing moisture can also be achieved by opening the composter lid for a few hours^ Don't be afraid to make mistakes during the process, you will learn from experience^ It would be a good idea to write down these experiences and keep some records; they might come in useful in the end! Refer to TROUBLESHOOTING for more detailed information^ NOTE: The decomposing process has a lot to do with the surface area the tiny creatures have to operate on^ The best results are achieved when individual pieces in the decomposing mixture are kept small^ Cut or shred larger ingredients into smaller pieces^ A lawn mower can be used to shred dry leaves when no shredder is available^
MATERIAL CARBON/NITROGEN INFO
Table scraps Nitrogen Add with dry carbon items^
Fruit & vegetable scraps Nitrogen Add with dry carbon items^
Chicken/rabbit manure Nitrogen Excellent compost 'activator', use in moderation^
Coffee grounds Nitrogen Filters may also be included^
Tea leaves Nitrogen Loose or in bags^
Grass clippings Nitrogen Add in thin layers so they don't mat into clumps and putrefy^
Garden plants Nitrogen Use disease-free plants only^
Lawn & garden weeds Nitrogen Use only weeds which have not gone to seed^
Flowers, cuttings Nitrogen Chop up any long woody stems^
Seaweed and kelp Nitrogen Rinse first; good source for trace minerals^
Eggshells Neutral Best when crushed^
Leaves Carbon Leaves break down faster when shredded^
Straw or hay Carbon Straw is best; hay #with seeds# is less ideal^
Pine needles Carbon Acidic; use in moderate amounts^
Wood ash Carbon Only use ash from clean materials; sprinkle lightly^
Cardboard Carbon Shred material to avoid matting^
Corn cobs, stalks Carbon Slow to decompose; best if chopped up^
Dryer lint Carbon Best if from natural fibers^
Wood chips Carbon High carbon content can overwhelm, and shut down, an otherwise good compost batch; use sparingly^
Sawdust Carbon High carbon content can overwhelm, and shut down, an otherwise good compost batch; use sparingly^ Be sure sawdust is clean, with no machine oil or chain oil residues from cutting equipment^ Do not use sawdust from painted or treated lumber^
AVOID ADDING THESE INGREDIENTS TO THECOMPOST MIXTURE:
Meat, fish, fats and bones - These could ferment or putrefy, causing odors, and attracting flies, rodents or other animals that can be pests^
Other foods like dairy products, sauces, salad dressing, and cooking oil – These can ferment or putrefy, causing odors, and attracting flies, rodents or other pests^
Paper products – They may contain chemicals that are bad for your compost^ These should be recycled
Ashes -Wood ashes maybe very useful but in small quantities^ Never add BBQ grill ashes directly into the compost mixture^
Dog and cat feces – May cause a risk of adding diseases! Moderate amounts of chicken, horse, cow, and rabbit manure may be fine^
Perpetual weeds that have turned to seed or diseased plants – Not to be used as they can spread with the compost^
Any cooked or canned foods that contain salt - Salt kills the little creatures that do the composting in your mixture^
Important: Do not add any part of the Black Walnut tree; it contains a chemical that may inhibit the composting process^
TROUBLESHOOTING
Odor Too much nitrogen=Mix in "brown" material and rotate tumbler
Too much moisture=Lack of oxygen
The Mixture Does Not Heat=Up Lack of nitrogen Mix in "brown" material and rotate tumbler
Lack of oxygen=Rotate tumbler
Lack of humidity=Humidify mix
Too much humidity=Mix in "brown" material and rotate tumbler Particle size is too large Cut or grind materials
Attracts Animals/Pests=Mixture contains bones, meat, or fatty foods, or animal manure AVOID ADDINGTHESE MATERIALS TOTHE MIXTURE. #See AVOID ADDING THESE MATERIALS TO THE MIXTURE#
For more info: Search for online & open the instruction for miracle gro tumbling composter TC100 instruction manual.pdf [however you can get it to open] Read Less
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Asked by
des moines, Iowa
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May 15, 2016
Answer: 
Sounds like you don;t have enough 'green' material. The 'green' material: food scraps (no cooked animal scraps or greasy foods), grass clippings, green leaves, manure, etc to mix with the 'brown' material: such as dried leaves, sawdust , yard trimmings, etc.
3 parts Brown, 2 parts green, a dash of soil to get things going and water. Pile should be moist, not wet.
Also, the container should be in Read More
Sounds like you don;t have enough 'green' material. The 'green' material: food scraps (no cooked animal scraps or greasy foods), grass clippings, green leaves, manure, etc to mix with the 'brown' material: such as dried leaves, sawdust , yard trimmings, etc.
3 parts Brown, 2 parts green, a dash of soil to get things going and water. Pile should be moist, not wet.
Also, the container should be in the sun to help warm things up. If it's not hot enough, add a little more green. And make sure that all pieces are small, it helps the process along.
It will take several weeks before you have compost. It shouldn't smell or attract flies. If it does, make sure the food stuff is well covered. Read Less
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Asked by
columbia SC
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April 13, 2016
Answer: 
Any vegitable matter works, watch the liquid level, usually just pour off the excess,
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Asked by
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March 18, 2016
Answer: 
For any composter, ratios are important - you need a much higher dry ratio than wet, as well as types of materials. Here is a link to an article about things to help a soggy composter, in terms of carbon/nitrogen additions. http://learn.eartheasy.com/2010/03/how-to-fix-a-soggy-compost-pile/
Your oatmeal and lentils may go in as a "wet" addition, provided they do not have any fat additives (ie: milk, Read More
For any composter, ratios are important - you need a much higher dry ratio than wet, as well as types of materials. Here is a link to an article about things to help a soggy composter, in terms of carbon/nitrogen additions. http://learn.eartheasy.com/2010/03/how-to-fix-a-soggy-compost-pile/
Your oatmeal and lentils may go in as a "wet" addition, provided they do not have any fat additives (ie: milk, butter, oil, etc.)
It will take quite a bit of time for your compost to cook and break down. A happy compost bin is usually warm to the touch, and I've even seen mine steaming in winter. Even if your ratios are correct on the types of material you add, expect it to take a while to decompose. I seem to remember that when I first started my pile in the fall, I didn't have usable material until the following spring (but I live in a cold zone. Things go much faster in a more temperate climate.) Either way, patience is key. Keep adding, and keep turning, and you will get the hang of it. Read Less
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March 17, 2016
Answer: 
Yes, you can compost cooked oat meal and leftovers.
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5 answers

How wide is the opening?

This question is from Tumbling Composter with Two Chambers for Efficient Batch Composting
Asked by
Wayne, NJ
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March 23, 2015
How easy is it to get the compost out? Do you just turn and dump or scoop out?
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Asked by
columbia SC
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May 26, 2016
Answer: 
each side is about a foot
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Asked by
El Dorado, AR
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June 22, 2015
Answer: 
Wide enough to add what you want to compost.
You turn it according to instructions, etc. - also has to do with what you are using to compost.
When one side is ready you begin on the other side. - When ready to use the side that is ready, you lay a sheet or barrel or whatever, open that side, & roll the composter to dump the compost.
You could probably scoop it out - but why.
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Asked by
Western washington
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May 21, 2015
Answer: 
Door slides both directions and will slide all the way out, opening both "sides" easily.
Each sides access door is about 8" x 6".
Get stuff in by putting it in with small trowel/ shovel.
Get stuff out of it by turning opening to the bottom, sliding door open, let gravity empty finished compost into a bucket.
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Asked by
I.E. California
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March 26, 2015
Answer: 
There are two openings. One on each side about 9 in wide. Just turn upside down and compost should fall right out. Put something underneath it though to catch it.
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Asked by
peru,in
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March 24, 2015
Answer: 
9"x6" i plan to turn and dump, with either a small tarp or a tote under it. this is my first batch, and with winter it's going slow.
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5 answers

how many gallons is this?

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October 15, 2014
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Asked by
columbia SC
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April 13, 2016
Answer: 
looks about 30 gallons, about like those small rain barrels
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Asked by
Baton Rouge
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July 16, 2015
Answer: 
Yes, BillyMac is right. 11cu ft is 82gallons. So this would be a little less than half of that. It looks like Billy Mac has done the math for us both.
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July 11, 2015
Answer: 
5 Cubic Feet (37 Gallons)
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Asked by
El Dorado, AR
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June 22, 2015
Answer: 
I believe each side will have about 17.5 gal.
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Asked by
peru,in
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March 24, 2015
Answer: 
i'm guessing 10 gallons on each side.
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Customer Reviews

Rated 4.3 out of 5 by 355 reviewers.
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by No Assembly Instructions are Included After assembling this composter, it appears to be very sound. HOWEVER... there's no assembly guide included. I'm not a moron, but I'd like to have some direction on how to put this thing together. Instead of having instructions in front of you, you're directed to a guide online. The manufacturer is assuming that your laptop or desktop will be in the general vicinity of where you're assembling the item. THEN... when you actually access the guide, it's incomplete. It directs you to install four nuts and bolts per panel. WRONG. That's the four nuts and bolts ON THE SIDES. When you're assembling this, be sure to add the nuts and bolts that attach each panel to the other. It'll save you time, and you won't have to bring a second person into the process when reaching deep into the well with a wrench in one hand and screwdriver in the other. October 8, 2016
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Easy Assembly/ Nice look...productivity info to come later After months of debating and deliberating, and getting approval from my wife once she heard from someone else about composting, I finally purchased this Composter. It was easy to assemble after reviewing the instructions and following the video on YIMBY website. It's very light weight and easy to move, and I don't think that's due to me being 6'3" 315lbs. I've already placed it in my backyard and added material. Don't be ashamed if you need help as my arms are longer which made it easier for me to carry. The reviews certainly helped, and I added the compost starter, also available at HD to help out. It even has a nice look to it. Also I took the other reviewers advice and sprayed the legs and metals with Rust inhibitors. I choose Rust-o-leum. The door is a bit smaller, but it should be easy to manage. August 31, 2015
Rated 1.0 out of 5.0 by Worst composter I agree with several of the other reviewers. I have had this composter for two years now. It took hours to put together and needed additional parts, etc., to actually make it fit and work. When filled, it leaks and creates slimy sludge that requires a lot of dry material to absorb. It also smells like a sewer most of the time. Once cured, you end up with big balls of dirt clods. That's after you wrestle the material out of the bin by hand, which is hard to do because of all the bumps and things inside the bin. The price was good and that was the only thing that it has going for it. Wish I had not purchased it. April 9, 2016
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Not bad for the size and price Good little composter. Perfect for beginners. Easy set up. Not sure how long it will last, but after a few months, still going strong. May 21, 2015
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Great Composter for the Small Home Garden I purchased a tumbler because I got tired of attracting opossums, raccoons, herbivore dinosaurs, etc by doing the lazy mans way of composting....Dig a hole in the garden throw the kitchen scraps in and let nature do what it's designed to do! I mean the stuffs going in the garden anyway right? But this doesn't work well for larger volumes of yard waste like grass clippings and such. (The critters above also seemed to enjoy the desserts I left and didn't mind digging for them too.) This tumbler solved those problems and also made it easier to add rich compost to my newly built raised beds. I'm also convinced tumbling, rather than pitchforking your pile, multiple bin piles, or other methods - is the way to go. Seems more efficient, easier, and suitable for the small-potatoes gardener like myself. Assembly of the unit was fairly easy and painless - just follow the directions, take your time, and think ahead. The directions aren't the best - but lay the pieces out and see how they fit together and you'll be good to go. It took me about an hour and a half to complete the process with only a few - reversals to get things right. I've had the tumbler nearly a year now - bought it last fall and it's held up well. Decomposition was a little slow at first but I think that's because the compost had a difficult time getting up to speed with the cool temps. The barrel leaks a little bit but that's probably a good thing rather than having a soppy mess in the tumbler itself when it receives too much moisture. ( I need to find a suitable tub to catch the leakage for lovely compost tea.) Speaking of which? It if does get too sloppy inside? Just remove the lid and let the summer sun and the microbes evaporate the surplus. That sure works well in our Oklahoma heat! So also think about location too. Putting the thing under a shade tree might seem like a good idea, but then you're expecting biology alone instead of complete physics to work in conjunction with the barrel - especially since it's black and absorbs a ton of sun to help with decomposition. Also don't forget this IS a tumbler so the more you tumble? The faster stuff gets mixed up, aerated and breaks down. Tumbling when the compost gets sort of "settled" into a clump is a little tough, but add some more fluffy, loose stuff - tumble again - and you'll have a better mix and easier tumble. The two chamber system works ok - but I've rarely used it simply because the chambers are relatively small. A necessary engineering design of course because if you get the thing too big then you won't be able to tumble it well. In the summer decomposition is happening so fast anyway that I just fill both chambers up and tumble frequently. Within a matter of days what used to be at the top is now reduced by at least half. When things look pretty well broken down - and not four-legged critter friendly - I throw the stuff in the garden where it's needed. The two air vents on the side seem like a design afterthought. They don't stay in the full open position too easily (especially after a good tumble - they are rather loosey-goosey) and if your tumbler is anywhere near 2/3 full I'm not sure how much air is circulating to the pile through them anyway since the holes are covered by the compost. Oh well. I guess enough air is getting in through other means because in my tumbler things appear to be breaking down quite well. I just shoveled compost out when one chamber looked ripe. I overlook the obvious and now it seems that probably the easier route would have been to rotate the barrel with one chamber open and just dump it out! I know that there's all sorts of fancy advice and such to figure out what to put in the tumbler and how much - but again, I'm a lazy gardener and figure if nature has been making compost for millions of years without our help - it will continue to do so with minimal assistance from us now. Variety is the spice of life and so it seems it is with compost. I noticed better results when I threw in grass clippings, leaf litter, fruit and veggie scraps, compostable peanuts, sunflower stalks - the more variety the better. I add avocado pits and other roundish things too. In my head I'm thinking maybe these bang around the tumbler and help move things around and break up stuff too. Easily removed from the final compost if they haven't broken down already. Citrus peels add a nice aroma to the pile, break down fairly quickly and the decomposers don't seem to mind either. I also add a bit of old potting soil and garden dirt too. Figure there's good little buggers in there too. If the number of bugs I have crawling around eating the stuff that's in the bin is any indication - LOTS of decomposing is going on and therefore great compost thanks to this tumbler! August 4, 2015
Rated 4.0 out of 5.0 by Great little unit Firit; its 's "SUPPOSED" to leak; thats how rain water gets out. Many people use this TEA for new plants. Next, if its slimy and wet you need more dry material. Basicly its 2 to 1 of green/kitchen scraps to dry material IE leaves, dried grass ect. You should layer, leaves, wet, garbage, wet, some garden soil to add micro organisms, then more dry grass/ or leaves. FINALY dampen. YOU SHOULD ONLY DAMPEN EACH LAYER. It heats up in a few days and you rotate "one turn", every few days add kitchen scraps and then a layer of dead stuff, in the summer sprinkle with some water, and rotate ONCE every couple of days. If it smells or gets slimy its too wet and you need more dry material. After about teo weeks move it to the finished side and use a little between layers of garbage and dry leaves/grass as a starter. April 13, 2016
Rated 5.0 out of 5.0 by Best Composte Bin Ever I've had many compost bins, i.e. wire fencing, homemade with plastic garbage cans, tall rectangular with bottom slots for getting the "Black Gold" out. By far this tumbler is the BEST. Easy to put together, works very fast, heats up nicely. My first was two years ago. This year getting rid of the rectangular one and purchasing a second tumbler. April 17, 2016
Rated 3.0 out of 5.0 by Leaks but nice size Took a while to put together because there are a lot of nuts and bolts that are hard to reach at the same time unless you have long arms. It leaks smelly liquid from the seams and when you turn it the smelly liquid leaks all over. I wanted a composter that I could have on my deck and I love the size but the leaking will end up making me move it to the garden. I have another composter that is not suitable for the deck that does not leak like this. July 1, 2014
  • 2016-10-30 T20:35:15.883-05:00
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