Making a Hole with a Digging Bar

If you need to plant a tree or set posts, a digging bar can make the job of creating holes for them easier

Digging Bar - Hole with Digging Bar

Whether you need to plant a tree or dig a hole for a backyard barbecue pit, a digging bar is designed specifically to help you clear dirt, rocks and other items out of the way.

Digging Safety Tips

Before using a digging bar to create a hole, check for items that could be buried where you are digging — the most important of which are utility wires, cable lines, sewer systems and pipes.

Tip: Call 8-1-1 or request information through www.call811.combefore you dig to identify any underground concerns.  

  • Digging a hole: After selecting the location for your hole, plan its dimensions. Next, mark off the shape of your hole and start your hole by digging out the entire shape first, beginning at the edge and working your way around. After the shape has been dug out, begin making the hole deeper.
  • Safety: The most common accident when using a digging bar is when the bar slips, either from your hand (because you lose your grip) or from the object or area that you are digging or removing. You can also be injured from the strain exerted on your back, shoulders or arms when using the bar to pry. Use caution.

Tool Selection

When it comes to choosing the right tool for the job, consult this chart to learn about the different types of digging bars and their uses.

Type of Digging Bar Best Used For

Pinch point bar

  • Pinching and prying large objects
  • Typically 5 to 5 ½ feet long

Post hole digger

  • Removing soil from holes for footings or posts
  • Digs holes that are approximately 3 to 4 feet deep, 9 inches or larger in diameter
  • About 5 to 5 ½ feet long

Pry bar

  • Leveraging tool for moving large objects
  • Typically 5 to 5 ½ feet long

San Angelo bar

  • Digging in difficult soil
  • Can also cut end roots
  • Approximately 6 feet long

Tamper bar

  • Loosening tightly packed, rocky dirt and tamping it down
  • Digging post holes and then tamping down the soil around
    a post once it has been set
  • Approximately 5 to 6 feet long with a flattened 2 to 2-1/2-foot end
  • Typically used before switching to another tool such as a post digger