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Internet #202312890

Model #14525P

Store SKU #429512

King Fill Alarm and Gauge

  • Sports an unbreakable, easy-to-read vial
  • Powder-coated iron material resists corrosion
  • Features tangle-free solid hinge resistant to rough handling
  • See More Details

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Product Overview

The OEM King Fill Alarm and Gauge is designed for use with a vertical heating oil tank. This product has a large, easy-to-read, plastic vial that includes UV inhibitors and resists breakage. A new flanged vial provides double seal including exterior O-ring.
  • 2 in. bottom male threads (NPT) 1-1 /2 in. top female threads (NPT)
  • Available to fit vertical tank applications
  • Float impervious to petroleum products
  • Tangle-free solid link hinge is designed to withstand rough handling
  • Durable, cast iron with corrosion-resistant powder coating
  • Large, easy-to-read, plastic vial includes UV inhibitors and resists breakage
  • 2 rubber gaskets enable the gauge to accommodate up to 5 psi air-test requirements
  • Note: product may vary by store
  • California residents

Info & Guides

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Specifications

Dimensions

Product Depth (in.)
4
Product Height (in.)
29.5
Product Width (in.)
3

Details

Accessory Type
OIL TANK
Pack Size
1
Product Weight (lb.)
3
Returnable
90-Day

Warranty / Certifications

Manufacturer Warranty
0

Questions & Answers

10Questions11Answers

Is this item good for oil tank of 275 GA?

Asked by Natalia July 25, 2020
1
Answer

That would depend on the code in your state and town. For example my state now requires a dedicated two inch fill, dedicated 2" vent and dedicated 2" gauge. So the inspector in my town would not allow a combination unit. However the inspector in the next town over does. Thus your really need to put the question to the code enforcement official in your area. Often, because the storage of home heating oil is regulated as a potentially hazardous material, this is a specially trained member of the fire department. I would call the municipal town hall and ask.

When this is put on an outdoor tank does the alarm when filing require all other air exit points ...

Asked by Al53 November 24, 2019
1
Answer

I know of no approved way of installing a residential oil tank that has more than one vent. However if one exists logic would tell me you would need an alarm on all of them. The air being forced out the vent, when the tank is being filled, will take the path of least resistance. You would need to make sure that line has an alarm whistle and enough vented air to make it sing.

Bought this and installed it in 2014. It has only been 5 years and the float no longer works. Whe...

Asked by Cliff October 23, 2019
1
Answer

When you installed it, did you face the float arm away from the inlet pipe? If not, the float may have gotten knocked off by the force of the oil flowing into the tank from the truck delivery hose.

where is this on the oil tank ? Is this a do it your self job ?.

Asked by John January 4, 2019
1
Answer

To begin with, I want to apologize for not answering your questions sooner. The clock indicates you asked it months ago but unfortunately it just came to me today. As I assume you have already solved the issue I would say I am answering this for the benefit the others that might read this. Now to your question, a combination alarm and gauge would go on the vent tapping on an oil tank. As the tank is filled with oil the air in the tank will be pushed out the vent line. That air will cause the internal whistle to sing. When the oil level reaches the bottom of the whistle it blocks the entrance pipe and the sound stops. The stopping of the sound signals to the oil delivery person that the tank is filled and they should stop the flow of oil. Many states and inspectors no longer allow combination gauge and whistles. They want a separate gauge and a separate whistle. So most often these are purchased as replacements. My point is you should always find out what code and the inspector in your area wants, first, so you are not piping it twice. The person that inspects oil tank installations is usually not the plumbing inspector but often a specially trained member of the fire department.

How to install

Asked by Phil November 2, 2018
1
Answer

To begin with, I want to apologize for not answering your questions sooner. The clock indicates you asked it months ago but unfortunately it just came to me today. As I assume you have already solved the issue I would say I am answering this for the benefit the others that might read this. Now to your question, a combination alarm and gauge would go on the vent tapping on an oil tank. As the tank is filled with oil the air in the tank will be pushed out the vent line. That air will cause the internal whistle to sing. When the oil level reaches the bottom of the whistle it blocks the entrance pipe and the sound stops. The stopping of the sound signals to the oil delivery person that the tank is filled and they should stop the flow of oil. Many states and inspectors no longer allow combination gauge and whistles. They want a separate gauge and a separate whistle. So most often these are purchased as replacements. My point is you should always find out what code and the inspector in your area wants, first, so you are not piping it twice. The person that inspects oil tank installations is usually not the plumbing inspector but often a specially trained member of the fire department.

When the whistle stops working to you have to replace the complete assembly?

Asked by john November 4, 2017
1
Answer

Because home heating oil is a potentially hazardous waste, this question brings me concern. As the whistle has no moving parts, if it stopped working I would really want to find out why. As the tank is filled the air in the tank is forced out the vent. This air pressure and movement causes the whistle to make noise. When it stops the delivery person knows to stop filling the tank because the whistle is now blocked by oil. If the whistle is no longer working that could indicate that contaminant cause by the break down of the tank could be clogged. This would strongly indicate that the tank needs to be replaced. Or it could indicate the whistle has rotted out which would also indicate the tank needs to be replaced. The hazard posed by a oil release is so great I would want to get to the bottom of this. As to you initial question, if the whistle is broken you would need to replace it as there are no replacement parts. But pleas take this as a indication that you may want to have you entire fuel storage and delivery system looked at. Tank failures ruin homes.

Oil tank size?

Asked by Buz October 16, 2015
1
Answer

275 vertical tank

Dose the alarm have a sound cut off when tank is full ?

Asked by unclejoe September 29, 2015
1
Answer

It all depends how your tank is installed. Normally you have a fill line, and vent line. As the tank is being filled the air in the tank is displaced and forced out the vent. In the vent line is a whistle, as referenced in this product description. That whistle will sound until the oil level blocks off the bottom of the whistle. That is the signal to the delivery person to stop filling the tank. If they continue to fill the tank the oil will completely fill the vent and fill line. The oil poring out of the vent which is normally right next to the fill, should tell the delivery person they have gone to fare. This is the way it is suppose to work, but the industry is full of stories of people delivering fuel to the wrong homes and filling basements with oil.

Does it go on the fill pipe or the vent pipe

Asked by dptree February 12, 2015
1
Answer

It goes on top of the tank, at the beginning of the vent pipe line. Once the oil reaches the bottom of the whistle tube in the tank, the whistle will stop and the person filling will know to stop and that the tank is full.

how to take out the old one nd put in the new one

Asked by shawn August 8, 2014
2
Answers

The gauge is threaded, so you would unscrew it (Use a large pipe wrench with a long handle and possibly a pipe extension for leverage) , making sure it's clean around the joint so that no debris falls into the tank when you remove it. It's best to remove the old and install the new gauge when the oil is down to between 1/4 and 1/8 of a tank. The end of the gauge's lower arm floats atop the oil. If the tank is more than 1/4 full the lower arm will be approaching a right angle to the upper arm and may not clear the side of the tank when unscrewing or screwing the gauge. (You will need pipe dope or Teflon tape for the gauge's threads).

King Fill Alarm and Gauge - page 2

Customer Reviews

  • 5
    out of 6 reviews
  • 100% recommend this product
Filter by:
Showing 1-6 of 6 reviews
Good quality piece. Nicely done! Super accurate!...
Good quality piece. Nicely done! Super accurate!
by edatlarge
Quality craftsmanship plus has a better gauge for viewing than other brands. Works great. Be sure...
Quality craftsmanship plus has a better gauge for viewing than other brands. Works great. Be sure you know how to install it because the average person may ruin the float mechanism!
by gasman55
Rating provided by a verified purchaser...
Rating provided by a verified purchaser
by HomeDepotCustomer
Easy to install, works well.
Easy to install, works well.
by Shep
The fuel gauge was delivered and works well...
The fuel gauge was delivered and works well
by Troy
works great
Easy to install, instructions were easy to follow.
by baja
Showing 1-6 of 6 reviews