#1 Home Improvement Retailer

Internet #100318635

Model #INS541LD

Store SKU #211904

Low Dust Cellulose Blown-In Insulation 19 lbs.

  • Reduces sound power by 60%¹
  • Lowers heating & cooling costs by 25%²
  • Free 24 hour machine rental with the purchase of 20 bags
  • See More Details

Frequently Bought Together

+
Price:

Product Overview

Insulation Calculator
Keep your home comfortable in extreme cold and hot temperatures all year round. Greenfiber blow-in cellulose insulation fills gaps and voids to create an energy saving thermal blanket that can lower heating and cooling costs by 25% and reduce sound power by 60%. Fire resistant treated insulation is made with 85% recycled material that meets a Class 1 Fire Rating to protect your home and give you more time to evacuate.
  • Ideal for use in attics and walls: creates a thermal blanket that fills voids and reduces sound
  • Covers 40 sq. ft. per 19 lb. bag at R-19
  • Provides a 60% reduction in sound power when dense packed in walls¹
  • Reduces heating and cooling costs by 25%²
  • Fire resistant treated insulation meets Class 1 Fire Rating to protect your home and give you more time to escape
  • Made with 85% recycled content
  • No-itch formula doesn't require cutting tools; allowing for easy installation in just 3 steps: 1) assemble machine 2) place machine on flat, dry surface 3) point and blow-in
  • Can be applied over existing insulation or in new construction
  • ENERGY STAR
  • Limited Lifetime Warranty
  • ¹In field testing on identical 2x4 exterior wall types Greenfiber R-13 Stabilized Spray-In Insulation outperforms R-15 unfaced fiberglass batts by 4 NIC rating points. 4 NIC pts 60% reduction in sound power. The weak point in the assembly such as flanking through windows and doors will diminish the value of the reduction in sound power. Reduction in sound power is achieved through retrofitting, dense-packing or spray-applying cellulose in walls (contractor recommended installation). See manufacturer's installation instructions for full details on how to install to meet specifications.
  • ²Savings vary. Find out why in the seller's fact sheet on R-values. Higher R-values mean greater insulating power. Energy analysis of climate zones 1–7 using 2018 IECC refence home comparing R11 attic to DOE recommended attic insulation by climate.
  • Click here to learn more about Eco Options and Energy Efficiency

Info & Guides

You will need Adobe® Acrobat® Reader to view PDF documents. Download a free copy from the Adobe Web site.

Specifications

Dimensions

Coverage Area (sq. ft.)
40
Maximum coverage area (sq. ft.)
9.5
Minimum Coverage Area (sq. ft.)
61.8
Product Depth (in.)
13
Product Height (in.)
15
Product Width (in.)
25

Details

Bag Weight (lb.)
19.05
Compatible Install Surface
Existing Insulation,Fiberglass,Plywood,Wood
Insulation Features
Fire Block Rated,Formaldehyde Free,Soundproofing Insulation,Structural
Insulation Location
2x4 Wall,2x6 Wall,Attic,Ceiling Insulation
Insulation R-Value per Inch
R3.7
Insulation R-Value Range
R13-R60
Insulation Type
Loose Fill
Material
Cellulose

Warranty / Certifications

Warranty Information
Limited Lifetime Warranty

Questions & Answers

351Questions18Answers

Could this product be used to insulate hot tub cavity? (Away from motor) so it could be serviced. (Removable) without vapor shield? Thanks.

Asked by Larry March 14, 2021
2
Answers

Dear Larry: Given the potential for water vapor I would use rock wool batts instead. Rock wool does not absorb water and provider a higher R-value: R-4.1 per inch of thickness vs ~R-3.3 for blown celllulose. Rock wool is also much denser than fiberglass and molds kind of like clay, so it can be packed into nooks and crannies around your hot tub. Wear gloves and a good dust mask when you install it. The fibers are irritating, like fiberglass. I hope this is helpful. Mark

I plan on adding 12" green fiber to my existing 6" on attic floor. I will have rafter vents in e...

Asked by RustySpurr February 28, 2021
1
Answer

Dear Rusty: Blown cellulose is an excellent solution for attic insulation. Here are some installation tips: Depending on where your home is located and how much insulation is currently in your attic, you should have R-38 to R-60 in most parts of the USA. So it would be a good idea to consider blowing in a deeper layer. A copy of the zone map for the USA is attached below, showing the recommended R-values for attics. To achieve R-38 you would need to install blown cellulose 11.6 inches deep - which will become 10.44 inches after the cellulose settles. At this depth, you will get a maximum of 24.4 square feet per bag or 40.9 bags (minimum) per 1,000 square feet. Contractors typically add 10% to the 'optimum' to account for variations, so 45 bags per 1,000 square feet would be a good number for R-38 See the chart from Green Fiber, attached below. (Note: Cellulose settles 13% over time; the chart from Green Fiber attached below includes settling and the typical space taken up by ceiling joists.) Blown cellulose is a great solution for attics. Here are some tips for installation: (1) Step 1: Seal all air leaks. Before you add more insulation, carefully find and seal all of the air leaks into your attic. Recessed ceiling lights are culprit #1: install Tenmat covers and seal the edges with DAP 230 sealant. See: Tenmat Model # FF130E Home Depot Internet # 204286308 Store SKU # 1000012747 and DAP 230, Home Depot Internet #100035980 Store SKU #284425 Store SO SKU #1000058280 You can also quickly create covers with a piece of drywall; simply tape the edges with foil HVAC tape and seal the bottom edge with 3M fire resistant sealant. (See the details below.) Great Stuff foam is good to fill larger gaps and holes -- but do not use it near anything that gets hot, e.g. recessed lights, a chimney or exhaust vent. For gaps near a hot exhaust vent, fill the space with rock wool, then cover it with fire resistant sealant, e.g. 3M Model CP-25WB+, Home Depot Internet #100166701 Store SKU #163096 For the large gap next to a chimney, cover it with aluminum flashing (available at Home Depot) nailed to the joists, and seal the edges with 3M sealant. (2) Do not block soffit vents that circulate air in a standard vented attic. These vents are located along the soffits at the bottom edge of the roof. They cannot be covered and blocked by your blown-in cellulose. Install a 'channel cover' in each rafter bay to provide a protected opening for air to flow. See: ADO Provent Model # UPV14480, Home Depot Internet #100533902 Store SKU #739684. (3) Recessed ceiling lights: Some recessed ceiling light cans are designed for "direct insulation contact" -- and some are not. Carefully check your ceiling lights to see if they are rated for direct contact. If not, this would create a fire hazard if they are covered with insulation. If your ceiling lights are not 'direct contact' rated, you will need to build a box around each light -- to keep insulation away from the light. The quickest, cheapest and best option is to use drywall to create a simple box over each light. Tape the joints with foil HVAC tape. Home Depot also sells Tenmat covers that you can use to cover most lights. See: Tenmat Model # FF130E, Home Depot Internet #204286308, UPC Code # 859812004016 Store SKU #1000012747 Either way, seal the edges to block air leaks; HVAC mastic or DAP 230 work well. (4) Chimneys: If you have an internal chimney, first make sure the gap around it is air sealed, as noted above. Then build a 'dam' around it with drywall or 1" x 8" wood -- at lease 6" from the chimney surface. (5) Hot exhaust vents: Similarly, make sure the gap around exhaust vents are well-sealed as noted above. Then build a 'dam' around each vent, like the dam around a chimney. (6) If you have forced air HVAC ducts in your attic, you are probably losing significant $$ winter and summer. Before you add cellulose insulation, seal all of the ducts connections and seams carefully with mastic. See: Master Flow Model # WBA50, Home Depot Internet #100396973 Store SKU #559722. Then wrap the ducts in multiple layers of duct insulation. See: Master Flow Model # INSWRP60, Home Depot Internet #100152008 Store SKU #363984 Store SO SKU #1000684734. Fasten the wrap and seal all of the seams with foil HVAC tape -- NOT silver fabric "duck" tape. See: Nashua Model # 1207792, Home Depot Internet #100030120 Store SKU #915245 Then bury the ducts in 6+ inches of blown cellulose. (7) Install sticks vertically around your attic, screwed to the joists, with a mark showing the X inch depth -- so it will be easy to see when you have achieved the right level in each area. Remember the 'settling factor'. (8) Both people (in the attic and at the blower) should wear a good dust mask -- NOT the kind with a rubber band on the back. See: 3M Model # 6297PA1-A, Home Depot Internet #202078789, Store SKU #861149 One caveat: People sometimes think they can insulate their own walls with blown cellulose. This requires a high pressure blower and experience. The blower used for attics is low pressure and does not require experience. Home Depot can recommend a contractor if you want to insulate your walls. I hope all of this detail is helpful. Mark

What is the deference between the greenfiber cellulose and the all borac cellulose blown in insul...

Asked by tboz59 February 25, 2021
1
Answer

The difference is one is recycled being green in a little higher price for our environment. Dust issue , I say Borac 30 lbs is more dusty ...

Can i use this in my attic that has zero insulation currently?

Asked by DadBod February 24, 2021
3
Answers

Dead DadBod: Yes -- blown cellulose is ideal for attic insulation. Here are some installation tips: Depending on where your home is located and how much insulation is currently in your attic, you should have R-38 to R-60 in most parts of the USA. So it would be a good idea to consider blowing in a deeper layer. A copy of the zone map for the USA is attached below, showing the recommended R-values for attics. To achieve R-38 you would need to install blown cellulose 11.6 inches deep - which will become 10.44 inches after the cellulose settles. At this depth, you will get a maximum of 24.4 square feet per bag or 40.9 bags (minimum) per 1,000 square feet. Contractors typically add 10% to the 'optimum' to account for variations, so 45 bags per 1,000 square feet would be a good number for R-38 See the chart from Green Fiber, attached below. (Note: Cellulose settles 13% over time; the chart from Green Fiber attached below includes settling and the typical space taken up by ceiling joists.) (1) Step 1: Seal all air leaks. Before you add more insulation, carefully find and seal all of the air leaks into your attic. Recessed ceiling lights are culprit #1: install Tenmat covers and seal the edges with DAP 230 sealant. See: Tenmat Model # FF130E Home Depot Internet # 204286308 Store SKU # 1000012747 and DAP 230, Home Depot Internet #100035980 Store SKU #284425 Store SO SKU #1000058280 You can also quickly create covers with a piece of drywall; simply tape the edges with foil HVAC tape and seal the bottom edge with 3M fire resistant sealant. (See the details below.) Great Stuff foam is good to fill larger gaps and holes -- but do not use it near anything that gets hot, e.g. recessed lights, a chimney or exhaust vent. For gaps near a hot exhaust vent, fill the space with rock wool, then cover it with fire resistant sealant, e.g. 3M Model CP-25WB+, Home Depot Internet #100166701 Store SKU #163096 For the large gap next to a chimney, cover it with aluminum flashing (available at Home Depot) nailed to the joists, and seal the edges with 3M sealant. (2) Do not block soffit vents that circulate air in a standard vented attic. These vents are located along the soffits at the bottom edge of the roof. They cannot be covered and blocked by your blown-in cellulose. Install a 'channel cover' in each rafter bay to provide a protected opening for air to flow. See: ADO Provent Model # UPV14480, Home Depot Internet #100533902 Store SKU #739684. (3) Recessed ceiling lights: Some recessed ceiling light cans are designed for "direct insulation contact" -- and some are not. Carefully check your ceiling lights to see if they are rated for direct contact. If not, this would create a fire hazard if they are covered with insulation. If your ceiling lights are not 'direct contact' rated, you will need to build a box around each light -- to keep insulation away from the light. The quickest, cheapest and best option is to use drywall to create a simple box over each light. Tape the joints with foil HVAC tape. Home Depot also sells Tenmat covers that you can use to cover most lights. See: Tenmat Model # FF130E, Home Depot Internet #204286308, UPC Code # 859812004016 Store SKU #1000012747 Either way, seal the edges to block air leaks; HVAC mastic or DAP 230 work well. (4) Chimneys: If you have an internal chimney, first make sure the gap around it is air sealed, as noted above. Then build a 'dam' around it with drywall or 1" x 8" wood -- at lease 6" from the chimney surface. (5) Hot exhaust vents: Similarly, make sure the gap around exhaust vents are well-sealed as noted above. Then build a 'dam' around each vent, like the dam around a chimney. (6) If you have forced air HVAC ducts in your attic, you are probably losing significant $$ winter and summer. Before you add cellulose insulation, seal all of the ducts connections and seams carefully with mastic. See: Master Flow Model # WBA50, Home Depot Internet #100396973 Store SKU #559722. Then wrap the ducts in multiple layers of duct insulation. See: Master Flow Model # INSWRP60, Home Depot Internet #100152008 Store SKU #363984 Store SO SKU #1000684734. Fasten the wrap and seal all of the seams with foil HVAC tape -- NOT silver fabric "duck" tape. See: Nashua Model # 1207792, Home Depot Internet #100030120 Store SKU #915245 Then bury the ducts in 6+ inches of blown cellulose. (7) Install sticks vertically around your attic, screwed to the joists, with a mark showing the X inch depth -- so it will be easy to see when you have achieved the right level in each area. Remember the 'settling factor'. (8) Both people (in the attic and at the blower) should wear a good dust mask -- NOT the kind with a rubber band on the back. See: 3M Model # 6297PA1-A, Home Depot Internet #202078789, Store SKU #861149 One caveat: People sometimes think they can insulate their own walls with blown cellulose. This requires a high pressure blower and experience. The blower used for attics is low pressure and does not require experience. Home Depot can recommend a contractor if you want to insulate your walls. I hope all of this detail is helpful. Mark

How many bundles do I need to buy for 900 sq feet house ceiling

Asked by Sandy February 18, 2021
2
Answers

It is impossible to give you a completely accurate answer without knowing how much insulation you already have and what your target R-value is. However, based on no insulation and target of R30, it will take you 42 bags.

I have a garage with shop space, 1/2" osb interior walls with no insulation. Is this blow in insu...

Asked by JHH February 15, 2021
1
Answer

Dear JHH: No. The blower that Home Depot rents is low pressure and only for attics. A special high pressure blower plus experience are required to fill walls with cellulose. This is a job for a contractor. If your garage has an attic, however, this would be a good solution. For your garage / shop space, the cheapest and most effective solution would be to remove the OSB interior walls and fill the stud bays with rock wool batts, which provide R-4.1 per inch of thickness. If you live in an area with cold winters and/or hot summers, add 1" polyisocyanurate foam board, screwed to the surface of the studs. This will add R-6.5, plus break all of the 'thermal bridges' created by the (previously) exposed wood studs, and allow you to air-seal the walls. Seal all of the joints and perimeter to block air leaks. DAP 230 or HVAC mastic work well for joints and small gaps. Use the 'Window and Door' version of Great Stuff spray foam for the perimeter and larger gaps. Then install sheets of 3/4" plywood over the foam board - or 1/2" drywall. Plywood will give you a solid surface to mount shelves etc. Either 3/4" plywood or 1/2" drywall are required over foam board, because it is flammable. Also check your garage door. Is it insulated? If not, add Owens Corning insulation. See: Owens Corning model GD01, Home Depot Internet #202257272, UPC Code #047563700275, Store SKU #744925 Also make sure the seals on the edges of the door are in good shape. Home Depot sells PVC replacement seals, e.g. Frost King Model GR9, Home Depot Internet #100185922, UPC Code #077578050492, Store SKU #228614 I hope this is helpful and best of luck with your project. Mark

What are the recycled materials it is made from

Asked by JV February 15, 2021
1
Answer

regarding Greenfiber Low Dust Cellulose Blown-In Insulation 19 lbs. I couldn't say. Did you try reading the label/packaging?

How much does the machine cost to rent

Asked by Joe February 6, 2021
3
Answers

Dear Joe: Depending on how many bales of Green Fiber you purchase, the blower can be free. Call your local Home Depot's Customer Service or Tool Rental dept to find out. Also not that this low pressure blower is designed for attics only. A special high pressure blower plus experience are required to fill walls with blown cellulose. I hope this is helpful, Mark

Need 1200 sq ft of attic installation to be at R-30 rate how many bags do I need

Asked by Tony January 25, 2021
2
Answers

Tony, If you currently have no insulation at all, you'll need ~56 bags. If you have some insulation already then you need less, but without knowing how much it is impossible for me to say accurately.

Is this good for a attic? And how deep should it be? Thx

Asked by Joey January 10, 2021
2
Answers

Dear Joey: YES! Blown cellulose is the best insulation for attics -- both for R-value and cost effective. Here are some tips for your installation: Depending on where your home is located and how much insulation is currently in your attic, you should have R-38 to R-60 in most parts of the USA. So it would be a good idea to consider blowing in a deep layer. A copy of the zone map for the USA is attached below, showing the recommended R-values for attics. To achieve R-38 you would need to install blown cellulose 10.77 inches deep - after the cellulose settles. At this depth, you will get 17.1 square feet per bag. See the chart from Green Fiber, attached below. (Note: Cellulose settles 13% over time; the chart from Green Fiber attached below includes settling and the space taken up by ceiling joists.) Here are some tips for installation: (1) Step 1: First, seal all air leaks. Before you add more insulation, carefully find and seal all of the air leaks into your attic. Recessed ceiling lights are culprit #1: install Tenmat covers and seal the edges with DAP 230 sealant. See: Tenmat Model # FF130E Home Depot Internet # 204286308 Store SKU # 1000012747 and DAP 230, Home Depot Internet #100035980 Store SKU #284425 Store SO SKU #1000058280 You can also quickly create covers with a piece of drywall; simply tape the edges with foil HVAC tape and seal the bottom edge with 3M fire resistant sealant. (See the details below.) Great Stuff foam is good to fill larger gaps and holes -- but do not use it near anything that gets hot, e.g. recessed lights, a chimney or exhaust vent. For gaps near a hot exhaust vent, fill the space with rock wool, then cover it with fire resistant sealant, e.g. 3M Model CP-25WB+, Home Depot Internet #100166701 Store SKU #163096 For the large gap next to a chimney, cover it with aluminum flashing (available at Home Depot) nailed to the joists, and seal the edges with 3M sealant. (2) Do not block soffit vents that circulate air in a standard vented attic. These vents are located along the soffits at the bottom edge of the roof. They cannot be covered and blocked by your blown-in cellulose. Install a 'channel cover' in each rafter bay to provide a protected opening for air to flow. See: ADO Provent Model # UPV14480, Home Depot Internet #100533902 Store SKU #739684. (3) Recessed ceiling lights: Some recessed ceiling light cans are designed for "direct insulation contact" -- and some are not. Carefully check your ceiling lights to see if they are rated for direct contact. If not, this would create a fire hazard if they are covered with insulation. If your ceiling lights are not 'direct contact' rated, you will need to build a box around each light -- to keep insulation away from the light. The quickest, cheapest and best option is to use drywall to create a simple box over each light. Tape the joints with foil HVAC tape. Home Depot also sells Tenmat covers that you can use to cover most lights. See: Tenmat Model # FF130E, Home Depot Internet #204286308, UPC Code # 859812004016 Store SKU #1000012747 Either way, seal the edges to block air leaks; HVAC mastic or DAP 230 work well. (4) Chimneys: If you have an internal chimney, first make sure the gap around it is air sealed, as noted above. Then build a 'dam' around it with drywall or 1" x 8" wood -- at lease 6" from the chimney surface. (5) Hot exhaust vents: Similarly, make sure the gap around exhaust vents are well-sealed as noted above. Then build a 'dam' around each vent, like the dam around a chimney. (6) If you have forced air HVAC ducts in your attic, you are probably losing significant $$ winter and summer. Before you add insulation, seal all of the ducts connections and seams carefully with mastic. See: Master Flow Model # WBA50, Home Depot Internet #100396973 Store SKU #559722. Then wrap the ducts in multiple layers of duct insulation. See: Master Flow Model # INSWRP60, Home Depot Internet #100152008 Store SKU #363984 Store SO SKU #1000684734. Fasten the wrap and seal all of the seams with foil HVAC tape -- NOT silver fabric "duck" tape. See: Nashua Model # 1207792, Home Depot Internet #100030120 Store SKU #915245 Then bury the ducts in 6+ inches of blown cellulose. (7) Install sticks vertically around your attic, screwed to the joists, with a mark showing the X inch depth -- so it will be easy to see when you have achieved the right level in each area. Two charts are attached below showing the depth needed in each region of the USA. (8) Both people (in the attic and at the blower) should wear a good dust mask -- NOT the kind with a rubber band on the back. See: 3M Model # 6297PA1-A, Home Depot Internet #202078789, Store SKU #861149 One caveat: People sometimes think they can insulate their own walls with blown cellulose. This requires a high pressure blower and experience. The blower used for attics is low pressure and does not require experience. Home Depot can recommend a contractor if you want to insulate your walls. I hope all of this detail is helpful. Mark

Low Dust Cellulose Blown-In Insulation 19 lbs. - page 2

Customer Reviews

  • 4.3
    out of 735 reviews
  • 87% recommend this product
Filter by:
Showing 1-10 of 735 reviews
Full of contaminants
This insulation is filled with plastic shreds, candy wrappers, and a surprising amount of other non-paper items. These contaminants can reduce the insulating value of the cellulose and plain make it look cheap.
by Malcore
10 people found this helpful
I added Green Fiver to my existing 1 inch fiver insulation and it really reduces energy loss even...
I added Green Fiver to my existing 1 inch fiver insulation and it really reduces energy loss even I got only 8 inches deep so far knowing that the minimum for Texas have to be 12 inches but I ran out of money. Now my AC system barely turn on between 10:30 pm and noon even on those days we pass 100ºF. I notes on my daily electric consume there are no more picks it is much more steady with a decrease of electricity consume of around of 15%: Great! I cannot way to finish this project until I'll get at least 12 inches deep of Green Fiver insulation in my attic.
by JCG
2 people found this helpful
Good value and and shipped directly to home fast. Installed easily with free rental of blowing m...
Good value and and shipped directly to home fast. Installed easily with free rental of blowing machine!
by Dave
We bought 105 bales of it on a friday afternoon...
We bought 105 bales of it on a friday afternoon and installed 75 in my daughters house Saturday morning. It all went well till it got hot and they started to off gas a solvent type smell. It got so bad they couldn't stay in the house. I called Green Fiber with a complaint Monday morning and after some words they agreed to hire someone to remove and install a different insulation. I've used this insulation before and never had a smell like this before so I hope this was a bad batch. Now I have 30 bales of this garbage to dispose of or take back. Pay the extra $$ and use blown in fiberglass instead.
by Kelmoe
12 people found this helpful
Blew about 30 bags of this into my attic 7 years ago. My main complaint is this stuff settles ov...
Blew about 30 bags of this into my attic 7 years ago. My main complaint is this stuff settles over time and you loose R Value. When I say it settles, it REALLY settles. If you can see in the picture this insulation was covering the duct work by the time I was done. As you can see now it has settled a good 6 inches.
by Robmoo
6 people found this helpful
I was a little disappointed in all the plastic that...
I was a little disappointed in all the plastic that I had to get unwrapped from the shaft of the blow machine from the material. It was all cleaned off when I started before blowing in. The blowing machine and hose were badly damaged by someone using fiberglass in the machine prior to me using it.
by David
Dont let the naysayers talk you out of doing this yourself! My wife and I took a day and install...
Dont let the naysayers talk you out of doing this yourself! My wife and I took a day and installed 146 bags. We blew an additional 12 inches over 6 inches of blown in fiberglass. It is dusty but no so bad that a simple dust mask wont work. do your homework and get everything sealed up before you start and it will be fine. I used a tarp taped over the back door and a tarp over the attic access to keep the dust out of the house and it worked flawlessly. the only dust that got in the house was from contact transfer from my clothes as I climbed up and down the ladder. Bruce in tool rental at Joplin #34042 was amazing! He gave me pointers that were awesome!
by Swiney
6 people found this helpful
It's fine if they have machines in
It's fine if they have machines in
by Theworks
2 people found this helpful
I insulated an attic crawlspace of 220 sq ft up to R49 with 25 bags. The preparation of air seali...
I insulated an attic crawlspace of 220 sq ft up to R49 with 25 bags. The preparation of air sealing the attic was tedious but everything to do with blowing in the insulation was easy. It only took 1.5 hours with one guy on the blower and one guy in the attic. I can tell the difference in comfort in the space below now. We fed the hose from the attic out through a window to the blower below. We used the large "drum" style blower from HD and it worked great. It was actually an enjoyable process! Some of the tips from other reviewers I thought were most helpful: -wear goggles, N95 mask, and over ear protection. the ear protection for the hose operator and mostly to keep dust out. -the blower operator should break up blocks in a separate bin and load them slowly into the blower hopper as you go. -I didn't do this, but I wish I had taken another reviewer's advice and put up a shower curtain over the hatch. A lot of dust gets blow back into the living space and it took about an hour to clean up. -use a good light pointed up toward the ceiling or a headlamp to see through the dust. -I also didn't do this, but it would have been nice to have taped an extension on the end of the hose to reach the ends of the rafters. -It was helpful to use a walkie talkie call function to tell the blower operator to turn the blower on and off. If you get a good rhythm you only actually have to do this a few times. -I grabbed some free measuring tape papers from the insulation aisle at HD. It is extremely helpful to have something to gauge the depth instead of just eyeballing it. -Don't blow insulation directly into your soffit space. You'll want to vent it and block it.
by ZM
8 people found this helpful
Overall is a good value. I've been packing this stuff into the walls of my house using a home bui...
Overall is a good value. I've been packing this stuff into the walls of my house using a home built insulation blower. Basically a 55 gallon drum with agitator feeding through a Harbor Freight dust collector blowing through a 1 1/4" hose. Be aware that attics go fast, walls not so much. Slow and steady gives much better results when filling walls. Each section of wall I've pulled the vinyl siding off the outside, drilled a 2 1/2" hole near the bottom, stuffed the hose up and fill. When the flow slows down bring the hose down a little at a time to allow the blower to pack the insulation in tight. When I get to the bottom flip the hose over and stuff it down to pack the bottom in tight too. Then follow up with a 2 1/2" tapered wood plug. (It would be nice if Home Depot sold these in less than 400 count and smaller than 3") I ended up getting the plugs from JR Products. As you work watch out for fire blocking and blocking around the windows as you work. If you hit a block you'll need to drill another hole above the block and fill that cavity. Filling above windows and doors are obnoxious but it is worth it to have the job done right. When done with a wall I have check it the next morning with a thermal imaging camera to make sure I haven't missed anywhere. The before and after images show a radical difference. But the real difference is how the inside of my home feels. It is more cozy and warm on the cold mornings. The reason I give 4 stars is because of the amount of plastic mixed in with the material. Every other bag I have to stop and clean the agitator blade off or I get a loud thumping noise from the hopper and the flow slows to a crawl. If a larger piece gets onto the opening of the hose it clogs the blower and I have to stop and clean it out.
by Autotech
7 people found this helpful
Showing 1-10 of 735 reviews