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2 in. Universal Complete Toilet Flush Valve Repair Kit

$1098
  • Adjustable design that fits most 2 inch flush valves
  • Install to save water and stop tank to bowl leaks
  • Includes tank to bowl gasket, bolts, washers, and nuts
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Product Overview

The Everbilt 2 in. Toilet Flush Valve Repair Kit is the complete way to repair tank to bowl leaks and save water. It has all you need to restore the performance of you toilet flush valve. This toilet repair kit includes the water-saving 2 in. flapper, which can be adjusted to maximize water usage per flush. This kit fits most 2 in. two-piece flush valve toilet models. Parts include a replacement flush valve, a 2in. universal gasket and hardware suitable for most 2 and 3 bolt toilet tanks. Repair and replace old valve designs, leaky flappers and cracked or broken designs in one high performance kit. The overflow tube is easily adjustable to fit more tanks. The adjustable flapper controls and optimizes water use to save water.
  • Fits most 2 in. two-piece toilet flush valve common models
  • Quickly repair leaky tanks with this complete flush valve kit
  • Adjustable 2 in. flapper to maximize water savings
  • Overflow tube adjusts easily for a perfect fit
  • Complete kit with all parts you need including a tank to bowl gasket, 3 sets stainless steel bolts, washers and nuts.
  • Easy to install

Info & Guides

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Price
$1098
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$1998
$1998
Ratings
(111)
(45)
(1900)
(76)
Toilet Repair Kit TypeComplete Toilet Repair KitsFlush Valve Repair KitsComplete Toilet Repair KitsComplete Toilet Repair Kits
IncludedHardware IncludedHardware IncludedHardware IncludedHardware Included
Plumbing Part TypeToilet Flush ValveToilet Flush & Fill ValveToilet Flush & Fill ValveToilet Kit
Valve Type Flush
Application ToiletToilet
View ProductView ProductView ProductView Product

Specifications

Dimensions

Product Depth (in.)
3.19
Product Height (in.)
9.55
Product Width (in.)
4.32

Details

Included
Hardware Included
Material
Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS)
Pack Size
4
Plumbing Part Type
Toilet Flush Valve
Returnable
90-Day
Toilet Repair Kit Type
Complete Toilet Repair Kits

Warranty / Certifications

Manufacturer Warranty
3 years

Questions & Answers

Typical questions asked about products:

  • Is the product durable?
  • Is the product easy to use?
  • What are the dimensions of the product?

Customer Reviews

  • 4.4
    out of 125 reviews
  • 89% recommend this product
Filter by:
Showing 1-10 of 125 reviews
I badly needed to replace the toilet flush in my toilet. I had replaced the flapper many times bu...
I badly needed to replace the toilet flush in my toilet. I had replaced the flapper many times but now everything was corroded. This is not a job for the weekend handyman. It took me over two hours to do this job. There were no instructions except the pictures on the side of the box. There are six rubber and 6 metal washers but I had no idea of the order they were to be installed, so I tried to guess what the picture showed. It didn't work. I had water everywhere when I turned the water back on. I had to again remove the entire tank and start over. I used the old rubber washers and reinstalled. I think the repair kit is a good quality but I give it a reduced rating because of the lack of directions and the fact it was not a easy to install as the box says.
by Handyden
  • Recommended Product
Unfortunately I ordered the wrong size, thinking all commodes were standard size. This valve was ...
Unfortunately I ordered the wrong size, thinking all commodes were standard size. This valve was a 2" and I actually needed a 3", so I could not install it. I will have to send it back. As far as the product itself, it's made well and I've already installed one in my house. It was pretty simple. Turn off the water at the commode, flush it to empty most of the water out of the tank, undo the bolts under the tank, and remove the tank. Then it's just a matter of unscrewing the old one, screwing on the new one and lining things up with the flush handle so it will flush well. Put the new large gasket over the large plastic nut, then reinstall the tank and its bolts with the supplied new gaskets.Adjust the height of the main tube. It just telescopes just by pulling on it so you can get the right height about an inch below the flush lever nut. Check everything, then reinstall the water source hose and turn on the valve.
by pbeson
  • Recommended Product
The 2 in. Toilet Flush Valve Repair Kit is the complete way to repair tank to bowl leaks and save...
The 2 in. Toilet Flush Valve Repair Kit is the complete way to repair tank to bowl leaks and save water. The overflow tube is easily adjustable to fit more tanks. The adjustable flapper controls and optimizes water use to save water. The only thing I would have liked to see is a new filler valve as well, because of changing out the other pieces makes it nice to have all new inner workings of the toilet. So I just went to the store and picked one up!
by Steve
  • Recommended Product
This kit is designed to replace a 2” flush valve. That is not true in that the base for the valv...
This kit is designed to replace a 2” flush valve. That is not true in that the base for the valve is 2 1/4inch in diameter. The Flush valve rubber seal would fit a hole with a maximum diameter of 2 3/4inch diameter as the plastic ring nut that secures the valve to the bottom of the tank is 3” in diameter and needs a minimum of 1/4or 3/8inch less diameter hole so that the Large, white plastic Nut will catch on the tank bottom and the black rubber seal, at the top of the threads, will fit in the hole from inside the tank. When clamped together black rubber seal keep the tank from leaking. Most tanks should accept this flush valve. There are no instructions in the box which can be frustrating for a person new at this task. There are some pictures on the front of the box, but they do not accurately portray how things fit back together to keep the large hole in the tank from leaking. I hope my photos are sufficient To remove the old flush-valve, you will need to remove the Tank that holds the water for the flush. 1) Remove the lid off the top of the tank and set aside. Note the orientation of the flush valve (which direction is the overflow pipe and flapper to the tank walls). 2) Turn off the water at the wall (or overall). 3) remove the hose from either wall or from the tank so that when the tank is moved, it is not anchored to the wall. 4) Hold up the flapper so that as much water as possible is drained from the tank. 5) use a sponge or rag to remove the remaining water in the tank. 6) Remove the two nuts that are holding the tank to the toilet seat. You may need someone’s help to use a screwdriver or pliers to keep the bolt top from turning while you unscrew the nuts below the tank (below the attachment shelf on the on the bottom half of the toilet). 7) Remove the tank from the seat. This is heavy and may require additional help. Now that you have the bowl off, you can get to the bottom of the bowl. 1) There is usually a black foam or rubber seal that fits over the bottom of the old flush-valve. Remove it carefully, as you may need to reuse it if the new foam seal does not fit. 2) Use a “strap” wrench, “Channel lock” wrench, Pipe wrench, or, if you are lucky, your hands can remove the large plastic nut holding the flush-valve to the tank. 3) remove the old flush valve from inside the tank. 4) with the large plastic nut removed, insert the new flush valve into the hole from inside the tank. Orient the flush valve like it was in step 1 above. Center the flush valve on the hole. 5) Screw on the new Large plastic Nut to the bottom of the flush valve that is sticking out through the bottom of the tank. The flat side of the nut should touch the bottom of the tank. Using one of the wrenches mentioned above to tighten the nut such that the black rubber gasket at the top of the large threads compresses into the hole in the tank. (Old Saying: Snug and a quarter turn more.) This is your primary water seal. The bolt pieces go together as follows. Bolt; insert black rubber washer all the way to the bolt head; Insert the bolt with washer inside the tank and through one of the 2 (or sometimes 3) holes in the bottom of the tank; Insert another black rubber washer; insert a metal washer; Screw on a nut; and tighten the nut until the two washers begin to “Dimple /squeeze” from the pressure exerted by the nut. That hole is now watertight. Repeat for the remaining 1 or 2 holes. If everything looks fine, you can manually test the tank by putting the tank on blocks and filling the tank with water. Still good…. Drain the tank. Put the black foam seal on the bottom of the Flush valve with the rounded side toward the toilet seat. (This keeps water from escaping out between the tank and the mounting plate. Position the tank into the toilet seat connection plate with the bolt pointing out the bottom of the connection plate. Use a Black washer, metal washer and Nut to connect each bolt to the . Evenly tighten up the nuts on both sides so that the tank comes down to meet the mounting plate tighten so that the tank stops wabbling. After the tank fills, you may have to re-tighten as the foam compresses. The 3rd. black washer is used help distribute the pressure on the connection plate from the nut tightening onto the metal washer. Too much pressure can crack the tank. Back to the review: . The top of the Flush Valve overfill tube needs to be below any dip or hole in the tank side through which water might drain. Usually there is the hole for the Flush handle. If the shutoff from the fill valve fails, the water needs to start draining into the overfill tube before it can go out the hole for the handle and onto the floor. The overfill tube for this flush-valve is adjustable without having to cut it to length with a saw. The upper, outside cylindrical tube can rotate counter-clockwise about 15 degrees (until it stops) so that two tabs move into a channel. The outer cylinder can now be lifted up or pushed down. You then can rotate the outer cylinder clockwise to lock in place. This adjustable feature saves time and can be readjusted later Make sure the flexible black pipe is securely connected to the “Fill valve” and is securely inserted into the small, black cylinder at the top of the “Flush Valve”. If this pipe gets loose, it can spray water and send it out from around the tank lid. It can cause water damage. The red flapper is also a nice design. How does a flapper work? When the tank finishes flushing, this flapper drops and seals the drain opening so the water stops draining. After flushing and the drain seals and the bottom of the flapper is now in the air above the drain. Any water in flapper drains out and creates an air bubble in the flapper. When the tank is flushed the next time, the air bubble causes the flapper to float up and keeps the drain hole open until 1) the water drains below the floating flapper allowing it to close or 2) the flapper fills with water and the flapper sinks into the hole. This flapper has an adjustable opening in the bottom to allow water to enter and cause the flapper to sink. There is a dial at the bottom hole that adjusts how quickly the water can enter. The larger the hole, the quicker the flapper fills with water and flapper drops to stop the flow. You might think that “zero” hole would make the longest flush. With a zero hole, the flapper might fill with water during the flushing cycles and that water could not drain after the flush. A flapper filled with water will shut off the flow immediately after the handle is released. There must be a non-zero hole. At the setting shown in the picture, it took about 3 seconds to close. A tighter but (non-zero) setting resulted in 4 seconds before it closed. Another feature of the flapper is the thick layer on top of the flapper. This stiffens the area of the flapper near the sealing circle so the flapper does not deform inward when under water and weakening the seal on the seat of the flush-valve. I had a flapper without this stiffening and the flapper began to leak after a few months. There are some considerations on how to connect the chain to the handle arm. These are best done while the tank is off the bottom half of the toilet in case changes can be made. 1) Does the chain for the attachment to the handle pull straight up (not to one side). You may need to loosen and rotate the flush-valve. 2) Is there a chance the chain can fall into the hole while the flapper is floating in up position? Shorten the chain. 3) Is the chain too short in that when the handle is fully pressed, the chain strongly tries to pull the flapper off the mounting pins? Lengthen the chain. The overall picture above shows the order of the parts to install the mounting bolts and the Fill valve body. The piece of wood represents the bottom of the tank. Note the rounded side of the Black, foam seal. The kit should work fine and can be a Do It Yourself project.
by Saltyron
  • Recommended Product
2 people found this helpful
Overall, the product works, but I do have to hold the flush down until it is completed or else th...
Overall, the product works, but I do have to hold the flush down until it is completed or else the flapper will shut before enough water went down for the flush. Part of this is likely just how old my toilet is. It naturally has a really slow flush from its age. If you're replacing a newer toilet flush valve, you'll probably have better results than me in this regard, but I docked a star for this. The other reason I docked a star was due to the lack of detailed instructions. Yes, the install is easy, but the only instructions you get are the ones printed on the back of the box. Nothing else, nothing showing exactly how you're supposed to put the washers and such on the bolts, etc. For these reasons, I chose to deduct 2 stars. Here are some instructions in case you'd like more detail: 1. Empty the toilet tank of as much water as possible. Turn off the water to the toilet and flush. Hold the flush open to drain as much water out of the tank as possible. The tank should not refill. If it is, your water isn't all the way off. From here, you can sponge out the remaining water, or have a small cup nearby to catch it. 2. Since you'll be removing the tank from the toilet, go ahead and disconnect the water supply hose as well. You'll want to have a towel and/or cup ready to catch a little residual water in the line and tank. 3. Remove the bolts holding the tank to the toilet (should be 3 of them). I used a large screwdriver and some vice grips. These may be a bit stuck at first as well; this is probably the hardest part of the whole process. 4. Carefully lift the tank off of its seat and place it on its side. Plan out where you are going to put the tank. If there is any water still in it, plan for where that water is going to go. I had a towel and a cup nearby to help catch and clean up any water. 5. Remove the old rubber seal (probably on the bottom of the tank, but it theoretically could have stuck to the toilet as well). This should expose a plastic/nylon nut holding the old flush valve in place. 6. Remove the old flush valve. Remove the plastic nut holding the flush valve in place and take out the old valve. You might need some channel locks and pliers to do this. NOTE: any rubber seals will likely be prone to stain your clothing/floors. It is usually fairly easy to wash off, but do so as soon as you notice it for best results. 7. Mount the new flush valve. Now it's time to basically do the reverse of the above steps, but attaching the new hardware. Stick the new valve through the opening in the bottom of the tank. Check to make sure things look to be in the correct position and screw the plastic nut onto the bottom of the toilet. Hand tight is probably OK here. 8. Attach the rubber gasket over the plastic nut. Use the picture on the box if you're unsure of the direction it should go. 9. Carefully place the tank back onto the toilet. NOTE: it will be a bit wobbly here as the fresh rubber seal will need to be compressed in with the bolts. Check to make sure the bolt holes are lined up properly to ensure the tank is in the right place. 10. Attach the tank to the toilet with the included bolts. Included in this kit are 3 bolts, 6 rubber washers, 6 metal flat washers, and 6 nuts. This is where I wish there were more detailed instructions. The way I did it is, I put the rubber washers on the inside, and the metal washers on the outside. You'll want to rotate through and tighten each bolt a bit until the tank feels snug and looks pretty level. I used vice grips and my screwdriver for this. 11. Re-attach the water supply line to the toilet. 12. Check the height of the flush valve to see if it needs to be adjusted. It should stick maybe half an inch above the water line (you can adjust further later if needed) 13. Turn the water on. As the tank fills, check for leaks. If you find any, turn the water back off, and tighten your bolts a bit more to hopefully resolve the issue. NOTE: this kit does not include a replacement for your fill valve. If your toilet is as old as mine (mid 80s) is and still has an old floating ball and arm fill valve, you might have trouble mounting this without also replacing the fill valve because the arm and ball might interfere with the flush valve. The fill valve is MUCH easier to replace (doesn't require tank removal), so I recommend going ahead and doing both if your hardware is super old like mine (mine was definitely a leak waiting to happen). Home Depot does sell kits with both the flush and fill valves if needed. I was replacing an old Mansfield flush valve with this unit. Everbilt does have a product specifically for Mansfield, and it may work better than this flapper design in my particular toilet. I chose to switch hardware designs mostly because this is what I'm accustomed to using (and it is the more modern approach). PROS: - Leak free - Relatively easy to install - Stainless steel bolts shouldn't corrode in the event you have to do this again. CONS: - Maybe it's my toilet just being old, maybe I installed it wrong, I don't know, but I have to hold the flush open until it is completed or else the flapper will close pre-maturely and likely prevent a full flush. - Lack of detailed instructions included. The only instructions I had were what is on the box.
by WithReviews
  • Recommended Product
2 people found this helpful
Good product to stop the constantly leaking toilet, but this is only the flush valve NOT the fill...
Good product to stop the constantly leaking toilet, but this is only the flush valve NOT the fill valve; and, yes, you do need to take the tank off (meh, my least favorite part of the job). It has all the parts needed, including three tank- to -bowl bolts. The height overflow tube and the flapper are both adjustable. It fit my Glacier Bay toilet and states that it fits "most" toilets that use a 2 inch flapper.
by Lbvb
  • Recommended Product
This Everbilt product is just the ticket for running toilet problems. It is very easily installed...
This Everbilt product is just the ticket for running toilet problems. It is very easily installed with minimal effort and plumbing knowledge. The water inlet tube is easily adjustable to fit the height of any size tank. The flapper has an adjustable setting that allows for conserving water. With the flapper sitting on an angle this assists in a good seal.
by Rboy
  • Recommended Product
Everbilt have a great reputaion on their products and this one its no different. This 2 inches to...
Everbilt have a great reputaion on their products and this one its no different. This 2 inches toilet flush valve repair kit comes with everything you need for installation. With this kit you will be able to repair leaky tanks in no time. The flapper and overflow tube are adjustable in order to fit more tanks. The kit comes with everything you need: bowl gasket, steel bolts, washers and nuts. It also have a 3 year warranty.
by Nandy
  • Recommended Product
Please make note that this is only the flush valve and does not contain the fill valve with it. I...
Please make note that this is only the flush valve and does not contain the fill valve with it. I initially made that mistake but just had to run and pick up a fill valve to complete the project. Pretty easy installation but you do have to remove the tank portion of the commode for this piece. I put the black rubber gaskets in the incorrect order the first time which means I had to take everything back apart again to resolve the leak. But that was entirely my fault. This product though plastic seems very sturdy and comes with a full 7 year warranty!
by PastorB
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Rating provided by a verified purchaser...
Rating provided by a verified purchaser
by HomeDepotCustomer
    Showing 1-10 of 125 reviews